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Thursday, 24 September 2020

Moacir Santos "Carnival Of Spirits" 1976 Brazil Latin Samba Jazz Fusion masterpiece

 


Moacir Santos "Carnival Of Spirits"  1976 Brazil Latin Samba Jazz Fusion masterpiece...!

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The final work of Moacir Santos, a Brazilian songwriter who also handles saxophone, in Blue Note. Among them, the duet "Sampaguita" with soulful Linda Lawrence, "Anon" which develops a bitter jazz samba fusion from the dawn of the mysterious berimbau, and the masterpiece of crossover based on Brazilian music and jazz.....~


The under-recorded composer, arranger and saxophonist Moacir Santos was one of the godfathers of modern Brazilian music. In the 1960s, Baden Powell and Wilson das Neves studied under him and he composed and arranged for Nara Leão, Sérgio Mendes and Roberto Menescal. Recorded in Los Angeles, Carnival Of Spirits is one of Santos’s few own-name releases, a seamless blend of jazz and samba, anchored by Harvey Mason......~


One of the main Brazilian arrangers, having renovated the country's harmonic language in the '50s, the underrated Moacir Santos had nevertheless a highly influential role as he had as his pupils, in the '60s: Paulo Moura, Oscar Castro-Neves, Baden Powell, Maurício Einhorn, Geraldo Vespar, Bola Sete, Sérgio Mendes, Dom Um Romão, João Donato, Roberto Menescal, Carlos Lyra, Dori Caymmi, Airto Moreira, and Flora Purim, among others. In 1968, he was admitted into Henry Mancini's cinema music writing team and, four years later, he launched his first album in the American market, The Maestro, which was nominated for a Grammy award; it was followed by Saudade (1974), Carnival of the Spirits (1975), and Opus 3, No. 1 (1979). Owner of a distinctive Brazilian style as a composer and arranger, Santos' most-known tunes are "Nanã" (written with Mário Teles), which had over 150 different recordings (including those by Herbie Mann and Kenny Burrell); and "Coisas" (number one to 12); not to mention a series of compositions with Vinicius de Moraes ("Triste de Quem," "Menino Travesso," "Se Você Disser Que Sim," "Lembre-Se"), who praised him in his "Samba da Benção." Having written the arrangements for, among others, Vinicius de Moraes e Odete Lara (1963), Santos also composed the soundtracks for the films Love in the Pacific, Seara Vermelha (an adaptation of Jorge Amado's novel, directed by R. Aversa), Ganga Zumba (Cacá Diegues), O Santo Médico (Sacha Gordine), and Os Fuzis (Ruy Guerra), among others. 
Santos had contact with music very early in his life in the local band Flores do Pajeú (Pernambuco), taking classes with bandmaster Paixão and joining the group at 14 on the saxophone, clarinet, trumpet, banjo, guitar, and drums. Leaving home two years later, he played around northeastern Brazil until 1943, when he got a break at the Rádio Clube de Pernambuco. Having joined the Band of the Military Police of Paraíba in 1945, Santos replaced Severino Araújo (who had being invited to work in Rio de Janeiro) in the jazz band (a generic and common denomination at the time, not having to do with the repertory) of Rádio Tabajara da Paraíba, as a tenor/clarinetist. Two years later, he was appointed the conductor of the band and, in 1948, he moved to Rio de Janeiro, where his first job was at the gafieira Clube Brasil Danças, remaining there for 18 years as saxophonist and then as conductor/arranger. One month after his arrival in Rio he joined Rádio Nacional as a solo tenor of the Orquestra do Maestro Chiquinho, where he would work until 1967. Having studied under Hans Joachim Koellreutter's guidance, to whom Santos became an assistant, in 1951 he was invited by Rádio Nacional's A&R director, Paulo Tapajós, to be one of the regular conductors/arrangers of the cast. 

In 1954, Santos went to São Paulo, where he directed the orchestra of TV Record. Two years later, he returned to Rio de Janeiro, resuming his work at Rádio Nacional, also becoming Ary Barroso's assistant in the A&R direction of the Rozemblit recording company, and conductor at Copacabana Discos. At the peak of the success in Brazil, Santos released in 1965 his first solo album, Coisas. In the same year, he wrote the soundtrack of the film Love in the Pacific, having been honored by the Brazilian government with the payment of travel expenses to be present at the debut in New York, NY. In 1966, he was appointed as a member of ASCAP and in the next year he left Rádio Nacional. Moving to the U.S., Santos settled in Pasadena where he gave music classes at home until he was discovered by Horace Silver. In 1985, he opened with Radamés Gnattali, in Rio de Janeiro, the I Free Jazz Festival. In 1996, he was decorated by the President of the Republic of Brazil as Oficial da Ordem do Rio Branco. In the same year, Santos was paid tribute at the Brazilian Summer Festival (Ford Theater, Los Angeles, CA). His original arrangements for several of his compositions were transcribed by Mário Adnet and Zé Nogueira and recorded on the double-CD Ouro Negro (2001), which had the participation of Milton Nascimento, João Bosco, Joyce, João Donato, Djavan, Gilberto Gil, Ed Motta, and Santos himself. The album was launched with a show at the João Caetano theater, which was presented again at the Free Jazz Festival of that year.....bio .... by Alvaro Neder.....~


A sublime 70s session from Moacir Santos – a set that mixes the complex grooves he forged in 60s Brazil with the warmly jazzy sound of American fusion – all in a result that's totally unique! The album's quite different than any other electric Brazilian sets recorded in the US at the time – a complex album that's filled with soul and imagination – and not just an electrification of earlier styles from Brazil. Santos' vision here is wonderful – and he works with his own arrangements, and key help from producer Dale Oehler – who knows how to bring in all the right electric elements without losing the edge of Moacir's music. Players are great too – and include Jerome Richardson on soprano sax, Oscar Brashear on trumpet, Don Menza on tenor, Gary Foster on alto, Larry Nash on Fender Rhodes, Clare Fischer on piano, and Jerry Peters on organ. The sound builds and swirls in nice chunks, while the soloists creep in and lay down some horn parts – and a few vocalists, including Santos, add some slight lyrics from time to time.....~


Credits 


Alto Saxophone – Gary Foster 

Art Direction, Illustration [Art Director & Illustrator] – Bob Cato 
Bass – Chuck Domanico 
Clarinet, Bass Clarinet, Soprano Saxophone – Ray Pizzi 
Contractor – Jules Chaiken* 
Drums – Harvey Mason 
Electric Piano [Fender Rhodes], Clavinet [Hohner D6] – Larry Nash 
Flute [Bass Flute] – Ernie Watts 
Flute [Flute & Alto Flute], Tenor Saxophone – Don Menza 
French Horn – David Duke 
Guitar – Dean Parks, Dennis Budimir 
Organ – Jerry Peters 
Percussion – Louis Alves*, Paulinho*, Roberto Silva* 
Piano [Acoustic Piano] – Clare Fisher* 
Soprano Saxophone, Flute [Alto Flute] – Jerome Richardson 
Trombone – George Bohanon, J.J. Johnson 
Trumpet – Jerry Rusch*, Mike Price, Oscar Brashear 
Vocals, Baritone Saxophone, Alto Saxophone, Percussion – Moacir Santos




Tracklist


A1 – Quiet Carnival 

A2 – Jequie 
A3 – Kamba 
A4 – Sampaguita 
B1 – Coisa No. 2 
B2 – Tomorrow Is Mine 
B3 – Route Infinity 
B4 – Anon







George Duke "A Brazilian Love Affair" 1980 US Brazilian Jazz Fusion classic

 

George Duke "A Brazilian Love Affair" 1980 US Brazilian Jazz Fusion classic (feat - Milton Nascimento,Airto...& many others..)  recommended...!

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Stone-cold classic Brazilian/ Jazz fusion masterpiece! Features a host of Brazilian superstars - Milton Nascimento, Airto, Flora Purim, Toninho Horta, Simone and many more. Essential!....~ 


It is with deep sadness that I learned today of the death of George Duke last August from leukaemia, a little over a year after he lost his wife to cancer. 

A Brazilian Love Affair is a fine album and a fitting tribute to the man and the musician. Duke had for several years worked with Brazilian artists Airto Moreira and Flora Purim and clearly loved Brazilian music. When he flew to Rio to record this ode to a country and a music he loved, he brought them with him to work alongside great Brazilian singer and songwriter Milton Nascimento. The music falls between at least three stools with strong funk elements that thankfully are always balanced with good taste, strong helpings of jazz, but enough music thanks very much to Nascimento's contribution to justify the use of the word `Brazil' in the record's title. 

What shines from this record apart from Duke's love of Brazil, is the lushness and the real intelligence of Duke's arrangements, his virtuosity both as a player and producer, and the real empathy of all the players involved. The result is an album which so easily could have ended up badly with a lesser performers being little short of a triumph. 

A very fine record indeed and, I'm sorry to have to put it this way, a fitting tribute to a man who will be sadly missed....Mr. K. J. Morris.....~


What a lovely album. Something of a concept album where Mr Duke musically explores Brazil,this album has it all: Disco, Latin jazz, Jazz Fusion, and even a bit of folk (but dont let that put you off!)but funky and massively cool. Give your wife it for her zumba class... she'll soon get slim, and she'll love you more & more for the gift ;) A classic album that doesn't seem to date; maturing like a fine wine. This has now been re-released by Columbia-Jazz, tidied up and given the digital re-mastering trick. There's not a bad song on the album, unless youre not keen on Brazilian Folk (the last track). Enjoy... it really is a superb album thoroughly deserving of five-stars. 
One person found this helpful.... ernie167.....~


Brazilian Love Affair is one of George Duke's most well-known albums from a long and illustrious career which has spanned five decades. 

Prior to releasing Brazilian Love Affair, George Duke was first know as a talented Jazz pianist before moving into pop and becoming famed within the RnB scene for hits such as Dukey Stick and Reach For It as well as working with Frank Zappa. 

His 1979 album involved him travelling to Rio De Janeiro, Brazil and collaborating with a number of local musicians and vocalists including Milton Nascimento, Flora Purim and Airto Moreira. Although fans of his earlier work hoped for a return to instrumental jazz, Brazilian Love Affair instead provided an album which seamlessly mixed jazz with pop and soul influences......~


Limited 180gm audiophile vinyl LP pressing including insert. George Duke (1946-2013) was an American musician, a keyboard pioneer, composer, singer, and producer in Jazz and R&B. He recorded A Brazilian Love Affair (1980) in Rio with great singers such as Flora Purim, Milton Nascimento and Airto Moreira. Although not the return to instrumental Jazz some hoped it would be, this heartfelt effort does contain it's share of Jazz-influenced material. From a Jazz standpoint, the most noteworthy songs include 'Cravo e Canela', the charming 'Brazilian Sugar', 'Love Reborn', and 'Up from the Sea It Arose and Ate Rio in One Swift Bite'. The album is clearly a labor of love from start to finish.....~


It seems that every American jazz musician explores the music of Africa and Brazil at some point or another. George Duke had already shown in interest in Brazilian music, recording Milton Nascimento’s famous “Maria Tres Filhos” as far back as 1974 (on Faces In Reflection). But A Brazilian Love Affair is something very different: a fusion of American jazz/funk and Brazilian jazz/pop that consummates Duke’s love affair with the country and its music. 

Duke alludes in the album notes to finally having the “means” (i.e., the money) to make this record, and we can infer from his reference to this as a “labor of love” that he didn’t expect to get his money back. The album didn’t chart particularly well in the US, at least not as well as his earlier funk albums, although listeners certainly got their money’s worth. Duke doesn’t simply appropriate Brazilian pop for his own funky designs but seeks to find middle ground between the two. That said, Duke can’t seem to resist adding a couple of radio-friendly funk numbers into the mix just to hedge his bets. 

The opening “Brazilian Love Affair” is such a commercial cushion. Selected as the album’s single, it is essentially Duke’s funk band augmented with Brazilian percussion (courtesy of Airto Moreira). You get a feel for the Brazilian currents to come, but you also get a funky bass solo from Byron Miller and a familiar Rhodes solo from Duke on the fade. 

“Summer Breezin’” is where the album hits its stride, blending Brazilian and American funk/disco music into something unique and wonderful. Lynn Davis and Josie James do a great job on the backing vocals (it’s a shame they weren’t used more on these sessions) and the whole piece blows by like a cool breeze. Duke also slips a terrific trombone solo into the arrangement, courtesy of Bill Reichenbach. 

“Cravo e Canela” is the first of two Milton Nascimento songs that feature the artist himself on vocals and guitar, and this leans much closer to traditional Brazilian music. Duke’s contribution to this and the closing Nascimento track, “Ao Que Vai Nascer” (which would roughly translate as “To those yet born”), are minimal. I suspect Duke’s light hand comes from the fact that you can’t improve upon perfection. As much as this is Duke’s project, Nascimento is the star of this album. (He was, of course, already an established star in Brazil.) The haunting “Ao Que Vai Nascer” will remain with the listener long after the album is over. 

After a short piano piece that was apparently composed one morning during the sessions, Duke is joined by Flora Purim and an all-Brazilian band for the delightful “Brazilian Sugar.” This and “Summer Breezin’” are probably the best representatives of the fusion that Duke was after, although “Up From The Sea It Arose And Ate Rio In One Swift Bite” gets an honorable mention for working a fiery electric guitar solo from Roland Bautista into the mix. 

“Sugar Loaf Mountain” and “Love Reborn,” on the other hand, fit more into the “inspired by Brazil” category. They feature Duke’s funk band and wouldn’t be completely unexpected on a typical George Duke record from this period, except for perhaps the wordless vocal style adopted by Duke on “Love Reborn.” When the band is joined by another Brazilian singer, Simone, on “I Need You Now,” the balance shifts back to the middle. 

Personally, I wasn’t that jazzed about hearing yet another funky followup to Reach For It, so the decision to take a southern detour and experiment with Brazilian sounds is a welcome departure. (I also love Brazil and its music, and not least because half of my family is Brazilian.) Whether it changes the way you hear George Duke, the answer is “probably not,” although it should expand your musical horizons a bit and get you running to buy at least one Milton Nascimento record......~


George Duke had been fairly visible in the R&B world thanks to funk gems like "Reach for It" and "Dukey Stick" when he ventured to Rio to record A Brazilian Love Affair, a superb date employing such greats as singers Flora Purim and Milton Nascimento and percussionist Airto Moreira. Although not the return to instrumental jazz some hoped it would be, this heartfelt effort does contain its share of jazz-influenced material. From a jazz standpoint, the CD's most noteworthy songs include Nascimento's "Cravo e Canela," the charming "Brazilian Sugar," "Love Reborn," and the exuberant "Up from the Sea It Arose and Ate Rio in One Swift Bite." Meanwhile, Nascimento's vocal on the ballad "Ao Que Vai Nascer" is a fine example of Brazilian pop at its most sensuous. But however one labels or categorizes this music, the album is clearly a labor of love from start to finish...... by Alex Henderson.....~


George Duke combines his jazz funk fusion styles with Brazilian influences, even using some Brazilian musicians mixed in with American artists, and it works beautifully. Reading the notes to each song the list would be long describing, or listing, the wide variety of keyboards George Duke uses, seems he's got them all covered. Which brings me to the other instruments, from Paul De Souza's trombone to Flora Purim's vocal (a real treat to hear them both on the same track 'Brazilian Sugar', on side one), to Milton Nascimento's acoustic guitar and vocals, and Airto's various percussion. I won't name all the supporting cast, there are a lot, all good, especially Roland Bautista's electric guitar on 'Love Reborn'. There are many nice little touches, of water chimes, cowbells, glass chimes, timbales, bongos, as an underlay filling out and supporting the various horns, trombone, flugelhorn, saxophone. Side one from start to finish is outstanding, starting out with a classic, 'Brazilian Love Affair', a must to play for any Dj, then continues on with 'Summer Breezin', 'Cravo E Canela and Brazilian Sugar', which are three of the best tracks on the album. Side two starts out with a real funky number 'Sugar Loaf Mountain', then 'Love Reborn', another instrumental with great electric guitar, then there are two songs, one by Milton Nascimento the other by Simone, sung in their native tongue, which finish out the album. An album with more instrumental numbers than vocal ones, and lots of George Duke's keyboard wizardry, and an album that would fit right in being blasted out into the streets in Rio from a small cafe selling excellent coffee, where the sun shines smiling rays and the summer breezes cool off the heat and make way for the night in a city which never sleeps....catwomyn ...~


A Brazilian Love Affair wangles the tightrope walk between Jazz, jazz-rock fusion, Funk and Brazil, the genres George Duke's always been inspired by. George was wise enough to hire the real guys in Brazil and fuse their contributions with those of his Californian studio troupe. The "purest" Brazilian song certainly is Ao que vai nascer by and with Milton Nascimento - it doesn´t even have a George Duke production sound; he does play a little piano at the end, though. The funky title song is great as it sets off, gets a bit on my nerves during the bass interval and then compensates toward the end when George has a nice e-piano solo. Of the funky tracks, Sugar Loaf Mountain is surely the best: funky, dodgy, clever. George and his cohorts are in a great mood here, and it´s clear that the session must have been great fun for all the participants. It would have been even a bit better had George used the real grand piano instead of the Yamaha electric grand. Summer Breezin' introduces the Brazilian flavor. I always had my greatest demurs about George Duke's singing ambitions. Often, the music is quite charming and then his superficial and unfelt vocals destroy the mood (best example: I Need You Now). It works much better when George lets others sing, as on the Milton Nascimento song Cravo e canela - Milton himself sings. Also on Brazilian Sugar, one of the songs, where the concept really works - dear Flora (Purim) sings beautifully and Raul de Souza has a trombone solo. Mind you, the lineup is beyond any doubts: Byron Miller, Ricky Lawson, Airto Moreira, Roland Bautista, Jerry Hey, Sheila Escovedo, Roberto Silva, Simone, Toninho Horta, the list goes on... Up From The Sea is a successful fusion of Funk and Samba - check out Roland Bautista! 
It was 1980 when this album hit the streets, and the days when George Duke was the big crossover producer, who guaranteed the stars hit albums and unfortunately also boring same-old-same-old format music - those days were still to come. A Brazilian Love Affair is a good George Duke album......~


George Duke's Brazilian fusion experiment certainly has its moments and highlights Duke's undoubted mastery of a whole battery of electronic keyboards.The LP was recorded in Rio and features a host of big name Brazilian musicicans as guests.The likes of Milton Nascimento,Airto and Flora Purim add an authentic Rio feel.The music is light and airy and a blend of keyboard fusion with Brazilian rhythms and percussion.I must admit that it does sound a bit dated and the slower numbers have aged badly but when things take off on tracks such as "Cravo E Canela" and "Sugarloaf Mountain" there is a real energy present......bruklover .....~ 


George Duke A Brazilian Love Affair 1980 Epic/CBSGeorge Duke A Brazilian Love Affair 1980 Epic/CBSToday’s ReCollect album choice comes in the spirit of the Olympics and Rio de Janeiro. ‘A Brazilian Love Affair’ was released in 1980 and has become one of George Duke’s most well-known albums in the R’n’b, Jazz, Latin fusion genre’s. George had travelled back to Rio de Janeiro in 1979 to work with local Brazilian artists. George is renowned for his Jazz, funk and R’n’b sound and always had a passion for latin music, so wanted to try something new.“My idea was to take typical Brazilian rhythms and put my stamp on them with my current touring band. I wanted to work with Milton Nascimento, and I might add that I was thrilled when he said OK. I mostly worked with his rhythm section and intermixed them with mine.” George said.“Brazilian Love Affair” is funky and full of bass licks. An up-tempo track that talks about the lifestyle of the Brazilians, beach life and being carefree. Listen out for when George gives shout outs to all the wonderful cities in Brazil. You can clearly hear the fusion between George’s well-known R’n’b, Jazz sound and the Brazilian instruments he chose to use on the track.“Cravo e Canela” was written by local Brazilian musician Milton Nascimento, mid-tempo and beautifully composed. This has become the signature and stand out track of the album because it’s Brazilian music at its best. It’s driven solely by Milton’s acoustic guitar and beautiful vocal harmonies. George has added his funk elements to the track but it still manages to keep its Brazilian authenticity.“Love Reborn” sets the scene for romance. The chimes in the intro are dreamy and delicate and conjures up a picture of the sun setting. The track changes towards the end, giving you a powerful rock guitar outro which completely changes the mood of the song.“Up from the Sea It Arose” is most likely inspired by the sounds of the world renowned Brazilian carnival and “Ao Que Vai Nascer”, the last song on the album, is an acoustic ballad that is performed and written by Milton Nacimento. A song that is sure to give you goosebumps as it builds. Tap into that Latin spirit and feel the tropics in your ears with this flawless, beautifully arranged album. ...mi soul....~ 


This George Duke's album is one of most often re-released (on CD) his album, and it's not strange at all. Recorded in Rio with Brazilian musicians and released for a first time in 1979, it was one of biggest Duke's commercial success. 
Does it means this album from late 70-s is too cheese and polished? Not an easy question. Music, recorded there, is mostly Latin jazz and funky light pop-jazz. So -looking from progressive fusion position, this album is really far from genre's definitions. But - music there is extremely fresh, pleasant and professional. 

Almost every composition is small sunny piece of great Latin grooves, funky rhythms and excellent melodies, with some jazzy flavour. Mostly keyboards -led, this album gives enough spaces for other musicians, including such Latin fusion stars as guitarist Milton Nascimento, early RTF singer Flora Purim and percussionist Airto Moreira. 

Music even if lightweight is never too cheese or boring, and musicianship is inspired and very enjoyable. And, comparing with Latin fusion Santana's recordings from similar time, this album is more musically professional and has stronger jazz/funk flavour. 

In whole - great work for Latin fusion fans. Enjoyable listening if you like melodic light funk jazz. Not a music for jazz-rock lovers for sure.But excellent musicianship for everyone searching just for great music.....by snobb...~ 




Line-up / Musicians 


- George Duke / acoustic & electric grand pianos, Fender Rhodes, Mini Moog, ARP Odyssey, Prophet V, Oberheim Strings, Crumar Strings, orchestral bells (2), vibes (5,9), vocals, arranger & producer 

With: 
- Josie James / vocals (2,9) 
- Lynn Davis / vocals (2,9) 
- Flavio Faria / vocals (3,8) 
- Lucinha Lins / vocals (3,8) 
- Zéluiz / vocals (3,8) 
- Lucia Turnbull / vocals (3) 
- Flora Purim / vocals (5) 
- Simone / vocals (9) 
- Roland Bautista / guitar (1,4,6-9) 
- Toninho Horta / acoustic (2,5) & electric (3,10) guitars 
- Milton Nascimento / acoustic guitar & vocals (3,10) 
- Murray Adler / violin (10) 
- Jerry Hey / fluegelhorn (2,9), trumpet (6) 
- Larry Williams / tenor (2) & alto (6) saxes 
- William Reichenbach / trombone (2,6) 
- Raul De Souza / trombone (5) 
- Byron Miller / bass (1,2,6-9) 
- Jamil Joanes / bass (3,5,10) 
- Ricky Lawson / drums (1,6,7,9) 
- Roberto Silva / drums (2,3,5,8,10), percussion (3,8) 
- Airto Moreira / percussion (1,8,10) 
- Chico Batera / percussion (2,3,5,8,10) 
- Sheila Escovedo / timbales (6,9), bongos & chimes (7,9) 



Tracklist

A1. Brazilian Love Affair (7:22) 
A2. Summer Breezin’ (4:48) 
A3. Cravo E Canela (Milton Nascimento/Ronaldo Bastos) (3:05) 
A4. Alone—6AM (1:07) 
A5. Brazilian Sugar (5:33) 
B1. Sugar Loaf Mountain (4:09) 
B2. Love Reborn (4:27) 
B3. Up From The Sea It Arose And Ate Rio In One Swift Bite (5:22) 
B4. I Need You Now (4:42) 
B5. Ao Que Vai Nascer (Milton Nascimento/Fernando Brant) (3:27) 






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