Saturday, 21 July 2018

The J. Geils Band ‎ "The J. Geils Band" 1970 US Blues Rock, Rhythm & Blues debut Lp ... classic..!


The J. Geils Band ‎ "The J. Geils Band" 1970 US Blues Rock Rhythm & Blues debut Lp..classic..!

J.Geils Band "Homework" 1970  {HQ) on google+

https://photos.app.goo.gl/W77LLJBL9yXkk1fX9

J.Geils Band "Heartbreaker" 1970 (HQ) on google+

https://photos.app.goo.gl/VygKkWvggUGM5q6a8

J.Geils Bannd Rock n Roll of Fame on spotify

https://open.spotify.com/user/rockandrollhalloffame/playlist/310xrrxtTKTi60kr4zStJf

full youtube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8F-Fca_9iLU&list=PL94gOvpr5yt2l7tbTpaQXwgZB7sCJz1Dl&index=2

The J.Geils Band all albums on spotify

https://open.spotify.com/artist/69Mj3u4FTUrpyeGNSIaU6F

The J.Geils Band all albums on dezeer

https://www.deezer.com/fr/artist/3318


The J. Geils Band’s self-titled debut serves notice that rock & roll wasn’t dead in 1970 despite the best efforts of the singer/songwriter brigade. Though it sounds a bit reserved in the light of the albums that followed, compared to the majority of bands on the scene, it was a nonstop blast of energy, fun, and sweat. Featuring the hipster jive of singer Peter Wolf, the amazing afro and harp chops of Magic Dick, the fret-burning work of J. Geils, and the jack of many trades Seth Justman (keys, compositions, backing vocals), the Geils Band rips through some classic blues by the likes of Otis Rush (“Homework”), Walter Price (“Pack Fair and Square”), and John Lee Hooker (a slow-burning “Serves You Right to Suffer”), old Motown gems (“First I Look at the Purse”), and originals that stand up well next to the covers (“Wait,” “What’s Your Hurry,” and future live favorite “Hard Drivin’ Man”). A nice mix of nostalgia, intensity, and bar band excitement, the album serves as fair warning that the Geils Band was on the scene and was ready to bring back the good-time spirit of the juke joint, the abandon of the early rock & roll scene, and the high energy of the late-‘60s concert halls…..by Tim Sendra….~



This is an early recording of the J.Geils Band. As such it still reflects the raw unpolished power the band had back in the day. It is old school and wicked. I loved this album when I first heard it, but later, at the release of their live album “Full House” I found out what the band was really all about. This album pales compared to what they do live. For example, “Crusin For Love” is not nearly as hard hitting in a studio version such as this is. “Hard Driving Man” is slowed to the point of not living up to it’s name. But, perhaps the biggest disappointment is “Serves You Right to Suffer”, the Howlin’ Wolf masterpiece that litterally screams with forlorn rage. Yet, rendered here with a sensitivity that glosses over the power felt in the “Full House” live version. If you are looking for the roots of this group, this is an album to have. Otherwise, if you want the real deal of the “bad boys” from Boston, then get their “Full House” album….by…. Michael Ary….~



The first J.Geils Band album is the band at their raw best. No flash, no glam, just 6 guys working hard to make a living as a blues/rock band. My first exposure to the JGeils Band was at a reltatively small outdoor rock concert in Detroit. They had a mid-afternoon time slot. It was a hot day in the motor city ,but these guys came out and rocked the place to an audience that got on their feet and really responded. The tunes they played were; Wait, Hard Driving Man, First I Look At The Purse, Pack Fair and Square, Serve you Right to Be Alone and all the rest of the tunes on this disc. I saw them again years later after they became a more commercially successful with songs on popular radio. By that time that had polished their act and had no problem entertaining an arena crowd, but somehow I still prefer to remember them as a band earning their bones in the hot sun just drivin’ it to the crowd. 

On this disc the recordings are straight ahead with a sound like they had live. No fancy studio tricks, no lofty production values, its J Geils at their best. If all you ever bought was the discs from their popular radio days you owe it to yourself to get this one…..ByR. Johnson……~



Bio by Stephen Thomas Erlewine
The J. Geils Band were one of the most popular touring rock & roll bands in America during the '70s. Where their contemporaries were influenced by the heavy boogie of British blues-rock and the ear-splitting sonic adventures of psychedelia, the J. Geils Band were a bar band pure and simple, churning out greasy covers of obscure R&B, doo wop, and soul tunes, cutting them with a healthy dose of Stonesy swagger. While their muscular sound and the hyper jive of frontman Peter Wolf packed arenas across America, it only rarely earned them hit singles. Seth Justman, the group’s main songwriter, could turn out catchy R&B-based rockers like “Give It to Me” and “Must of Got Lost,” but these hits never led to stardom, primarily because the group had trouble capturing the energy of its live sound in the studio. In the early '80s, the group tempered its driving rock with some pop, and the makeover paid off with the massive hit single “Centerfold,” which stayed at number one for six weeks. By the time the band prepared to record a follow-up, tensions between Justman and Wolf had grown considerably, resulting in Wolf’s departure, which quickly led to the band’s demise. After working for years to reach the top of the charts, the J. Geils Band couldn’t stay there once they finally achieved their goal. 

Guitarist J. Geils, bassist Danny Klein, and harpist Magic Dick (born Richard Salwitz) began performing as an acoustic blues trio sometime in the mid-'60s. In 1967, drummer Stephen Jo Bladd and vocalist Peter Wolf joined the group, and the band went electric. Before joining the J. Geils Band, Bladd and Wolf played together in the Boston-based rock revivalist band the Hallucinations. Both musicians shared a love of arcane doo wop, blues, R&B, and rock & roll, and Wolf had become well-known by spinning such obscure singles as a jive-talking WBCN DJ called Woofuh Goofuh. Wolf and Bladd’s specialized tastes became a central force in the newly revamped J. Geils Band, whose members positioned themselves as tough '50s greasers in opposition to the colorful psychedelic rockers who dominated the East Coast in the late '60s. Soon, the band had earned a sizable local following, including Seth Justman, an organist who was studying at Boston University. Justman joined the band in 1968, and the band continued to tour for the next few years, landing a record contract with Atlantic in 1970. 

The J. Geils BandThe J. Geils Band was a regional hit upon its early 1970 release, and it earned favorable reviews, especially from Rolling Stone. The group’s second album, The Morning After, appeared later that year and, thanks to the Top 40 hit “Looking for a Love,” the album expanded the band’s following. However, the J. Geils Band continued to win new fans primarily through their concerts, so it was no surprise that their third album, 1972’s Full House, was a live set. It was followed by Bloodshot, a record that climbed into the Top Ten on the strength of the Top 40 hit “Give It to Me.” Following the relative failure of 1973’s Ladies Invited, the band had another hit with 1974’s Nightmares, which featured the number 12 single “Must of Got Lost.” While their live shows remained popular throughout the mid-'70s, both Hot Line (1975) and the live Blow Your Face Out (1976) were significant commercial disappointments. The band revamped its sound and shortened its name to “Geils” for 1977’s Monkey Island. While the album received good reviews, the record failed to bring the group increased sales. 
Sanctuary In 1978, the J. Geils Band left Atlantic Records for EMI, releasing Sanctuary later that year. Sanctuary slowly gained a following, becoming their first gold album since Bloodshot. Love Stinks (1980) expanded the group’s following even more, peaking at number 18 in the charts and setting the stage for 1981’s Freeze Frame, the band’s high-water mark. Supported by the infectious single “Centerfold” – which featured a memorable video that received heavy MTV airplay – and boasting a sleek, radio-ready sound, Freeze Frame climbed to number one. “Centerfold” shot to the top of the charts late in 1981, spending six weeks at number one; its follow-up, “Freeze-Frame,” was nearly as successful, reaching number four in the spring of 1982. The live album Showtime! became a gold album shortly after its late 1982 release. 
You’re Gettin’ Even While I’m Gettin’ Odd While the band was experiencing the greatest commercial success of its career, relationships between the members, particularly writing partners Justman and Wolf, were volatile. When the group refused to record material Wolf had written with Don Covay and Michael Jonzun, he left the band in the middle of a 1983 recording session. Justman assumed lead vocals, and the group released You’re Gettin’ Even While I’m Gettin’ Odd in late 1984, several months after Wolf’s successful solo debut, Lights Out. The J. Geils Band’s record was a failure, and the band broke up in 1985. Magic Dick and J. Geils reunited in 1993 to form a contemporary blues band that released two CDs, Bluestime and Little Car Blues. Geils died in 2017 at the age of 71…..~ 



The J. Geils Band is the best album I’ve heard in some time. Made by six men who have spent the last five years learning their craft around the Boston – Cambridge area, it is a goodtime, modern piece of rock and roll; it is also totally devoid of the self-consciousness and pretensions that usually mar this kind of thing. In its energy, understanding, and execution the album not only reminds me of the early Stones, but compares favorably with them. 

Lead singer Peter Wolf has been an R&B fanatic since he can remember. Out of his knowledge of the music he has put together a truly personal and distinctive style that apes no one and expresses his point of view naturally. Guitarist J. Geils, on the other hand, came to R&B only after spending years studying jazz. Like Wolf he has gotten past the purely derivative stage and on this album establishes a distinct identity with his solos and outstanding rhythm playing. His timing is impeccable and he can be as mellow as he is hard. 

In many ways the album belongs to harpist Magic Dick. There are only four cuts (out of the 11) that could be called straight blues and on them he displays as broad a grasp of his instrument as I have heard by anyone recently. But even better is his ability to use the harp naturally and intelligently on material that would not normally call for its presence at all. Songs like “Wait” and “Homework” would normally rely on horns, but does the job so skillfully the listener never notes their absence. 

Seth Justman plays a real piano as well as organ. Most of it is confined to rhythm playing but it is done expertly and distinctively. Underneath everything Stephen Bladd and Danny Klein provide the kind of loose, unobtrusive drums and bass that are the cornerstone of R&B. 

The albums’ two instrumentals. “Ice Breaker” (dedicated to Mario Medios) and Albert Collins’ “Sno-Cone” are short and to the point. Everyone steps forward, blows a chorus, and steps back and lets the next guy burn. “Sno-Cone” has the shortest and one of the nicest drum breaks I’ve heard lately. 

“Wait” introduces us to the uniqueness of Wolf’s singing and song style: “The bartender says you’re disengaged, and I thought I saw you look my way …” Steve Cropper might well be envious of Geils’ rhythm while the arrangement has the kind of sway to it that makes it all sound so easy. 

“Cruisin’ For A Love” and “Pack Fair and Square” are two straight blues done as good as it can be done. The harp dominates both with its perfect lines and tone while the guitar supports perfectly and takes the lead with force and control when it is called for. All of it happening as Wolf sings us the lyrics of the immortal Juke Joint Jimmy: “I’m back on Broadway, cruisin’ for a love again.” 

“Serves You Right to Suffer” distills the essence of the genius of John Lee Hooker like it has never been done before: “Serves you right to suffer / Serves you right to be alone. You’ve been livin’ in the good day / The good day is gone.” 

“Homework” is an Otis Rush tune that comes back now as an R&B single styled burner. The ending is something else. 

Finally, “On Borrowed Time” is a straight soul ballad, written by Wolf and Justman. It is a highlight of the record and nowhere is the uniqueness of the band better shown. Instead of using horns, the harp and organ (the two instruments in the group that can sustain notes) fill out the arrangement, not only making it all sound full, but direct and honest as well. The singing and the rest of the arrangement are fine. 

The nicest thing about this album and the band is the balance they have found between the personal and the formal. They have chosen to work within certain conventions and modes. At the same time, they have completely avoided the route of slavish imitation and instead have put together an amazingly intimate and personal view of this kind of music. The material is perfect, the execution flawless, and the spirit never fails them. 

John Lee Hooker is fond of saying “Nothing but the best, and later for the garbage.” He could have been talking about the J. Geils Band. ….Jon Landau….~ 


The J.Geils Blues Band played at the Catacombs in January 1968 for 5 night between 23rd and 27th

The J. Geils Blues Band Promo Photo

About The J. Geils Band 

The J. Geils Band /de alz/ was an American rock band formed in 1968, in Worcester, Massachusetts, under the leadership of guitarist John “J.” Geils. The original band members included vocalist Peter Wolf, harmonica and saxophone player Richard “Magic Dick” Salwitz, drummer Stephen Bladd, vocalist/keyboardist Seth Justman and bassist Danny Klein. Wolf and Justman served as principal songwriters. The band played R&B-influenced blues rock during the 1970s and soon achieved commercial success before moving towards a more mainstream radio-friendly sound in the early 1980s, which brought the band to its commercial peak. After Wolf left the band in 1983 to pursue a solo career, the band released one more album in 1984 with Justman on lead vocals before breaking up in 1985. Beginning in 1999, the band had several reunions prior to the death of its namesake founder J. Geils on April 11, 2017.The band first released several Top 40 singles in the early 1970s, including a cover of the song “Lookin’ for a Love” by The Valentinos (which reached #39 in the Billboard Top 100 in 1972), as well as the single “Give It to Me” (which reached #30 in 1973). Their biggest hits included “Must of Got Lost” (which reached #12 in the Billboard Top 100 in 1975), “Come Back” (which reached #32 in 1980), “Love Stinks” (which reached #38 in 1980 and was featured in several films), “Freeze-Frame” (which reached #4 in the Billboard Top 200 in 1981), and “Centerfold” (which reached #1 in the United States in early 1982). 

Early days 
The band started as an acoustic blues trio in the mid-1960s, with guitarist John Geils, bassist Danny Klein (Dr. Funk) and harmonica player Richard Salwitz (stage name Magic Dick). The band formed under the name Snoopy and the Sopwith Camels while Geils was attending Worcester Polytechnic Institute for a couple of semesters. In 1968, the band switched focus, starting to play electric guitar and bass and recruiting two fellow musicians from a local Boston, MA band called The Hallucinations, who were a frequent performing band at the Boston Tea Party concert venue on 53 Berkeley Street. They were the drummer Stephen Bladd and his bandmate, (who was the fast-talking former WBCN disc jockey) singer Peter Wolf, born Peter Blankenfeld (originally from the Bronx, NY). They became The J. Geils Blues Band, later dropping the word “Blues” from the band name. The same year, former fan Seth Justman joined on keyboards, and the band started to earn a sizable local following in the Boston area. The band was choosy with its various offers of contracts, and unofficial live recordings circulated: as noted in Creem, “WBCN had the infamous J. Geils 'bathroom tapes’ (that were almost exactly what the name implies) and a tape of their performance at Alternate Media Conference at Goddard College, but these hardly sufficed.” The group ultimately signed to Atlantic Records in 1970. Initial influences included James Cotton and Little Walter, indeed in a later interview, harmonica star Magic Dick revealed that the whole band were “harp freaks”. 

1970s touring, recordings and early top 40 success 
After spending the better part of 1970 playing live shows around the US opening for artists as eclectic as BB King, Johnny Winter, The Allman Brothers and The Byrds, The J. Geils Band recorded their debut LP The J. Geils Band in August 1970 in A&R Studios in New York City, and it was released in November of that year. The band started to get airplay with release of their first single, a rock-cover of The Contours’ Motown hit, “First I Look at the Purse”, and soon the band would get more AM radio airplay with a series of several successful singles in the early 1970s, the first one being a cover version of The Valentinos’ “Lookin’ for a Love”, which appeared on their second album The Morning After and was their Top 40 debut in 1972 (at #39 on the Billboard charts). The album was released in October 1971. The song “Cry One More Time” (also on The Morning After) was later covered by Gram Parsons on his debut album in 1973.Through constant touring, the band soon built a large following in the US for their energetic live shows, with the charismatic stage-antics and “microphone-stand-pole-vaulting” of singer Peter Wolf, as well as its innovative use of the harmonica as a lead instrument. Harmonicalinks.com later called Magic Dick “a pioneer in sound and style for rock harmonica.” AllMusic.com described their 1970s period as a band “pure and simple, churning out greasy covers of obscure R&B, doo wop, and soul tunes, while cutting them with a healthy dose of Stonesy swagger.” On August 17, 1971, at a show on the Boston Common, The Allman Brothers Band named The J. Geils Band as its favorite local band. Both bands later played the last show at the Fillmore East prior to the venue closing. Although living in Boston, the band had always considered Detroit its second home because of its enormous popularity there. Two of its three live albums were recorded in Detroit at the Cinderella Ballroom and Pine Knob Music Theater (now DTE Energy Music Theater). Their second live album, 1976’s Blow Your Face Out, was recorded at the Boston Garden and Detroit’s Cobo Arena.After the release of their first two albums and keeping a busy show schedule, it was The J. Geils Band’s third album Bloodshot which was the first commercial breakthrough for the band, reaching #10 on the Billboard 200 album charts in the United States in 1973 and spawning the single “Give It to Me”, which went to #30 in the Billboard Charts following the album’s release in 1973. The original U.S. copies of Bloodshot were distributed in red vinyl, (instead of the customary black), with matching red 1950’s style Atlantic Records labels. The band would continue to use these vintage-style Atlantic labels, in different colors with each album release, throughout their remaining tenure with the label. Seeking to seize on this commercial success, the band released their following album Ladies Invited in November of that same year, which debuted at #51 but didn’t match the commercial success of Bloodshot. After spending the early part of 1974 on the road with an active touring schedule, the band went back into the studio and recorded their fifth album Nightmares…and Other Tales from the Vinyl Jungle, which yielded a big hit single, the Justman/Wolf composition “Must of Got Lost”, which reached #12 on the Billboard Top 100 in early 1975. Later that year the band started playing arenas across the US with a variety of artists including The Rolling Stones, Peter Frampton, and Rod Stewart. After their initial commercial success and with constant touring, the group seemed destined to be nothing more than a party band until the release of Monkey Island (1977), followed by Sanctuary (1978), which charted at No. 49 on the Billboard 200 and spun off a sizable hit single in “One Last Kiss” (No. 35 on the Billboard Hot 100). 

1980s commercial peak and breakup 
The group hit their commercial peak and achieved mainstream success in the early 1980s, first with the humorous Love Stinks which was released in January 1980 and yielded two Top 40 singles, the song “Come Back” which peaked at #32 on the Billboard chart, as well as the title track “Love Stinks” which went to #38. “Love Stinks” remained a staple in FM radio in the 80’s and was showcased in the 1998 hit film The Wedding Singer when Adam Sandler performs it in the film, and it also appeared on the film’s soundtrack The Wedding Singer Volume 2, also released in 1998. The band spent the better part of 1980 touring the US, Europe as well as touring Japan for the first time. The band followed up the success of Love Stinks with their hit album Freeze Frame, which reached #1 in early 1982 for four weeks. The first single “Centerfold” which peaked at No. 1 for six weeks on the Billboard Hot 100) “Centerfold” also became their only major hit single in the United Kingdom, where it reached No. 3 in February 1982. The title-cut “Freeze Frame” peaked at #4 in April 1982. The flip side of “Freeze Frame”, “Flamethrower” received airplay on Urban contemporary radio notably, in Metro Detroit, and reached number 25 on the Billboard soul chart and peaked at 12 on U.S. Billboard Hot Dance Club Play. The song also received airplay on rock and Top 40 stations. The third and final singles released from the album “Angel in Blue” peaked at #40 on the Billboard Hot 100 The band’s videos for “Centerfold” and “Freeze Frame” were in heavy rotation on MTV as well, which contributed to the album’s success. During 1982 the band was frequently selling out arenas around the US, including a month-long tour with U2 as their support act in March 1982., The band also undertook a two-month tour of Europe playing with The Rolling Stones from June & July of that year as well. The band followed up on the international success of Freeze Frame with the release of another live album, Showtime!, which contained their #24 live hit cover of “I Do”, originally a 1965 hit by the Marvelows, which the band remade for their 1977 Monkey Island album.Wolf left the group in 1983 over disagreements on the group’s musical direction. Many years later in 2016, Wolf offered the following recollection of the disagreements within the group that lead to his departure: “I did not leave the band, but the majority of the band wanted to move in another direction.[…] They wanted to continue in a pop-techno way, [and] it wasnt my thing."The band went on to record one more album of new material, You’re Gettin’ Even While I’m Gettin’ Odd. Seth Justman took over lead vocal duties in Wolf’s absence. The album produced only one single, "Concealed Weapons”, and was not a commercial success. The group then disbanded in 1985 after contributing the title song to the 1985 horror film Fright Night. 

Reunion appearances 
The group reunited with Wolf in 1999 for a 13-date tour of the East Coast and upper Midwest. Rollins Band drummer Sim Cain sat in on drums for this tour, which also saw the band supported by backup singers Andricka Hall and Catherine Russell, as well as the Uptown Horns (who had also appeared with the group on its Freeze Frame Tour). After the '99 reunion tour finished at that year’s end, Wolf returned to touring with his own backup band.On February 26, 2005, the band (with drummer Marty Richards) reunited at the Charles Hotel in Cambridge, MA, for a charity show for the Cam Neely Foundation for cancer care. On May 22, 2006, all six original members had a surprise reunion at bassist Danny Klein’s 60th birthday party at Scullers Jazz Club in Boston.On February 19, 2009, the band reunited again to perform the opening concert at the new House of Blues in Boston on Lansdowne Street (formerly the location of Avalon, Axis, The Embassy and The Modern), with Marty Richards on drums and Mitch Chakour supplying backup vocals. Subsequently, they played two shows on April 24 and 25 at Detroit’s Fillmore Theater (formerly State Theater). They also did a second show on Lansdowne Street on April 28.On July 11, 2009, The J. Geils Band played at the Borgata Hotel/Casino in Atlantic City, NJ, selling out the Borgata’s 2,000-seat event center. On December 31, 2009, the band reunited for a one-night live gig at the Mohegan Sun Arena in Uncasville, CT.The band played a benefit in Boston for Big Brothers/Big Sisters on January 23, 2010. On August 14, 2010, The J. Geils Band reunited once again to open for Aerosmith at a sold-out show at Fenway Park. For their 2010 dates, the band was again supported by the Uptown Horns along with backup singers Mitch Chakour, Andricka Hall and Nichelle Tillman. Hall and Tillman continued on in the band for their 2011 and 2012 tours, as did the Uptown Horns. Since this time, Wolf and Geils had also both been touring as solo artists. Danny Klein formed a new band called Danny Klein’s Full House that was dedicated to playing the music of The J. Geils Band.The J. Geils Band embarked on a short U.S. tour in August/September 2012. However, they left for the tour without J. Geils, replaced by touring guitarists Duke Levine and Kevin Barry, along with touring drummer Tom Arey. Geils filed an unsuccessful lawsuit against the other members of the group over use of the name for a tour without him. He named band members Richard Salwitz, Danny Klein, Peter Wolf and Seth Justman in the lawsuit filed in Boston Superior Court, claiming that they “planned and conspired” to continue touring without him and were unlawfully using the group’s trademarked name. Geils, angry at his bandmates for what they did, permanently left the band. Geils died in 2017.On May 30, 2013, The J. Geils Band performed six songs as part of the Boston Strong concert at the TD Garden in Boston. The concert, a benefit for victims of the recent Boston Marathon bombing victims, also featured Aerosmith, James Taylor, Boston, Dropkick Murphys, New Kids on the Block, Bell Biv DeVoe, Boyz II Men, Jimmy Buffett, Carole King, Extreme and Jason Aldean.In 2013 the band was the opening act for Bon Jovi in multiple locations across the United States. Beginning in the fall of 2014 and through the beginning of 2015, The J. Geils Band was the opening act for Bob Seger and the Silver Bullet Band on most tour dates across North America, along with a few solo shows. 

Projects outside of the band 
Since the breakup of the band in 1985, J. Geils began restoring sports cars in Massachusetts and started the performance shop KTR European Motorsports in Ayer, Massachusetts. In 1992, he joined his old bandmate Richard “Magic Dick” Salwitz to form the band Bluestime, which released two records: the self-titled Bluestime (1994) and Little Car Blues (1996) on Rounder Records. In 2004, Geils produced the album Nail It! for Massachusetts-based blues/rock group The Installers (Francesca Records No. 1011). He also occasionally performed live with the group. The December 2009 edition of Vintage Guitar (magazine) featured an in-depth interview with Geils by Mambo Sons guitarist Tom Guerra. In the interview, Geils revealed his playing approach, jazz influences and choice of instruments.Magic Dick contributed his harmonica playing and some vocals as part of a live recording called Command Performance by the Legendary Rhythm & Blues Revue featuring The Tommy Castro Band, Deanna Bogart, Ronnie Baker Brooks and others. Since 2007, he has toured as part of the Legendary Rhythm & Blues Revue on different Blues Cruises and again on land-based shows.Peter Wolf followed his time in the band with a moderately successful solo career, having six solo singles chart on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 in the 1980s and early 1990s. He continued to release albums into the 2010s. He toured with Kid Rock during the first half of 2008. 

Honors 
The band was nominated for induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in the years 2005, 2006, 2011, 2017, and 2018. They were not voted in on any of those attempts……~

The J. Geils Blues Band  The Unicorn Coffee House

The J. Geils Band - Love Stinks Tour 1980

The J. Geils Band - Love Stinks Tour 1980




Rehearsal, Boston, May 1977



The self-titled record introduced the world to the blues and soul inspired good time rock and roll band which had already gained a following in the northeast part of the U.S. due greatly to its reputation as a red-hot live concert attraction. The record contained several original compositions as well as smoking cover versions of songs by blues legends Otis Rush, John Lee Hooker and Albert Collins. The band’s rollicking cover of “First I Look At The Purse,” originally recorded in 1965 by Motown Records act The Contours, proved to be the first taste of radio airplay J. Geils would get and would kick off its long and successful reign as one of the most dynamic live bands of the 1970s….~ 

NYC, June 1974

From left Richard “Magic Dick” Salwitz, Seth Justman, Jay Geils, Wolf, Stephen Jo Bladd and Danny Klein.

Fusion Magazine, April 14, 1969


J.Geils Band 1979 - April 24th - The Paradiso, Amsterdam, Holland.......

J.Geils Band 1979 - April 24th - The Paradiso, Amsterdam, Holland.......

J.Geils Band 1979 - April 24th - The Paradiso, Amsterdam, Holland.......

J.Geils Band 1979 - April 24th - The Paradiso, Amsterdam, Holland.......

J.Geils Band 1979 - April 24th - The Paradiso, Amsterdam, Holland.......

J.Geils Band 1979 - April 24th - The Paradiso, Amsterdam, Holland.......


J.Geils Band By Al Shapiro

J.Geils Band By Al Shapiro

J.Geils Band By Al Shapiro


June 1972. The J. Geils Band  German Promo Photo

NYC, June 1974, Portrait Heads

Credits 
Bass – Danny Klein* 
Drums, Vocals – Stephen Bladd 
Guitar – J. Geils 
Harmonica [Harp] – Magic Dick 
Piano, Organ – Seth Justman 
Vocals – Peter Wolf 


Tracklist 
Wait 3:25 
Ice Breaker (For The Big “M”) 2:15 
Cruisin’ For A Love 2:32 
Hard Drivin’ Man 2:18 
Serves You Right To Suffer 5:01 
Homework 2:45 
First I Look At The Purse 3:54 
What’s Your Hurry 2:44 
On Borrowed Time 3:03 
Pack Fair And Square 2:01 
Sno-Cone 3:24 

The Lions Of Juda (The Lions Of Judea) ‎"Our Love’s A Growin’ Thing / Katja" 1968 single 7" + "Mary Cries Help" 1969 EP + “I’ve Got Starshine,-I’ve Got Luck!” single 7"1970 Israel Psych Garage Rock,Beat


The Lions Of Juda (The Lions Of Judea)  ‎"Our Love’s A Growin’ Thing / Katja" 1968 single 7" +  "Mary Cries Help" 1969 EP + “I’ve Got Starshine,-I’ve Got Luck!” single 7"1970  Israel Psych Garage Rock,Beat
full vk
https://vk.com/wall144874223_17051


The Lions (aka “The Lions of Juda”) were one of the top 3 most successful Israeli 60’s beat rock groups. 
The group was formed in the mid 60’s and like many groups of that time, the line up was very dynamic and group members have joined & left to play in other groups. 
The music they played was more of Pop Rock than the heavy underground style of the Churchill?s and Uzi & The Styles. 
They played in Tel Aviv, Ramla, Bat Yam night clubs, mainly cover versions for Beatles and other popular music groups from the UK/US charts of that time. 
Their first release was EP ?Mama? was released in 1968 on Eastronics/RCA. 
In 1969 the group left for visit toLondon and played a few gigs that eventually resulted in a recording contract with Fontana. 
The group recorded one 7" single for Fontana: “Our love’s a growing thing” / “Katja” that was released in the UK, France, Spain, The Netherlands and Israel of course. 
After their return to Israel, the group released many other 7?s & EP?s. 
Unfurtunately, though being successful and the release of many 7" singles & EP’s, the group never released a full length album during their ?classic? years in the 60?s and early 70?s. Only in 1997 there was a ?Best Of? CD release that gathered all their songs and some rare materials into one great CD…..~




Growing up poor in Tel Aviv, Haim Saban never had money for a car or taxis. He would walk everywhere, which is how one Wednesday evening, the then 20-year-old found himself at a swimming pool-cum-club in Tel Aviv, smelling an opportunity to make some money. 

“There was a band playing at the pool that was pretty lousy and the place was empty,” Saban remembers. “I was not in a band, but I thought, ‘let me try something.’ So I went to the owner of the pool and I say to him, ‘You know, you have this beautiful place here and the reason it’s empty is because this band sucks.’ And he said, ‘Well, people don’t like them so much, but you know, they’ve been here for a while.’ So I said, ‘I have a band and if we played here this place would be jam-packed.’ In those days, in the 1960s, big stars didn’t come to Israel. I told the pool owner, ‘I have the right kind of band and we are fantastic!’ And he said, ‘Well, do you guys play somewhere where I can come and hear you?’ And I say, ‘Yeah, of course!’”
“So now I have a client who’s willing to buy my wares, but I ain’t got no wares,” he says. 

Saban immediately approached a friend who owned a music store, asking if he knew of a band into which he could finagle his way as a member. His friend didn’t have a personal connection to any local band, but he did know of an apartment building close by from where live music could be heard streaming through the window at all hours. Perhaps there was a band there in need of a bass guitarist. He pointed out the apartment building, and Saban spent the next three days waiting for his chance.
“No music comes out the first day, no music comes out the second day, but music comes out the third day,” he says. “So I go and start knocking on doors and I identify the musicians and I say to them, ‘Where do you guys play? I might have a gig for you.’ They tell me and I say, ‘OK, thank you.’ That was it. So now I have a band that I don’t really have. So I’m thinking, how do I wiggle myself into this deal?”
With zero knowledge of the music business and guitar-strumming skills that didn’t extend beyond the ability to pluck a few chords, Saban hatched a plan. He wrapped his hand in a bandage, pretended he’d broken his arm, and convinced the pool owner that while he was out of commission temporarily, he’d be back on stage soon. In the meantime, he told the pool owner, he’d found a replacement bassist. They walked to the venue where the band was playing, Saban slipped the bouncer the $2 cover charge, and they awaited the start of the performance. 
“It’s the first time I hear this band and the guy who was singing sounded exactly like Paul McCartney,” says Saban, still marveling decades later at the sheer serendipity of the moment. “They were fantastic and I’m thinking ‘S–t, I’m halfway there.’” 

The pool manager wanted to hire them immediately, and Saban negotiated a deal that paid the band members twice the amount they’d been making previously. 

There was just one catch: the band needed to hire Saban.
The bandmates agreed. In two short weeks Saban learned how to play bass guitar and Lions of Judah, its name plucked from a biblical story, was born. 

“We used to play for three hours [on stage] so they taught me how to play for an hour and a half,” says Saban. “Half of the playing time I had the amplifier on, and the other half I shut it down because I didn’t know the songs. I’m not a good musician, but I did my homework and I knew this was my way out of profound poverty. Some people, because of their needs, go and become criminals. I have been very fortunate that I wasn’t attracted to these kinds of solutions. But when you live with five people in a place where when it rains it drips on you, you try everything you can possibly try. Necessity is the mother of all inventions.” 

Over the next couple of years, Lions of Judah, with Shuki Algranati on vocals and rhythm guitar, Ilan Dudman on bass, and Moshe Buyanjo on drums, grew in popularity and amassed a steady following. In 1969, Dave Watts from the British band the Tornados joined the Lions and they traveled to England where they performed in London nightclubs. They signed with Polydor Records and recorded a single, “Our Love’s a Growing Thing.” 

Eventually, its members decided that in order to take their act to the next level they needed to make some changes. Haim was out as bassist, but they offered to keep him on as band manager.
“One thing led to another,” says Saban. “At first I was managing one band, and then two bands.” 

Within time Saban was heading the largest music tourism operation in Israel, a skill he’d eventually parlay into producing records, composing music and creating his children’s television empire. 

But while his rock and roll days were over, he never lost his affection for the guitar. 

“I have a lot of fun playing the guitar — still. Everywhere I go I have a guitar, even when I travel, I take a guitar with me, this is how I get my head straight. Some people roll a joint, others do a line. I do guitar.”….By MALINA SAVAL …..~


The Lions Of Judea ‎" Our Love’s A Growin’ Thing / Katja"  single 7"1968

Tracklist 
A Our Love’s A Growin’ Thing
B Katja


Lions Of Juda  "Mary Cries Help" 1969 EP

Tracklist 
1 Mary Cries Help
2 You’re No Good
3 Bring Our Love Back Home
4 Red Phantom



The Lions Of Juda  "I’ve Got Starshine,-I’ve Got Luck!“1970 single 7”

Tracklist 
A I’ve Got Starshine, I’ve Got Luck!
B Where I Belong 





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