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Tuesday, 15 October 2019

A.R. & Machines/Achim Reichel "Die Grüne Reise - The Green Journey"1971 Germany Kraut Rock,Prog,Psych (Top 100 Kraut Rock Albums by Audion Magazine’s)



A.R. & Machines/Achim Reichel  "Die Grüne Reise - The Green Journey"1971 Germany Kraut Rock,Prog,Psych (Top 100 Kraut Rock Albums by Audion Magazine’s)(ex-The Rattles guitarist/vocalist Achim Reichel)

full deezer
full all albums on vk
watch interview with Achim Reichel by psychedelic baby 



Recorded 36 years ago, "The Green Voyage" had become a rare cult item amongst krautrock enthusiasts. Here it is finally re-issued with an accompanying film inspired by the music.Julian Cope, ex-leader of The Teardrop Explodes and author of the well-informed book 'KrautRockSampler' (1995), called 'The Green Voyage' "the final result of a kind of higher awareness...", and Brian Eno admitted that 'The Green Voyage' had been the main source of inspiration for his own album 'Another Green World' (1974). Previous album "Echo" is one of Uncut's "50 Great Lost Albums" - Aug 2010....~


This isn't one of those super rare but disapointingly overrated albums: Grune Reise delivers the trippy goods. Heavy and funky grooves with trippy guitar with tons of delay. It reminds me of Can bass, drums and lots of percussion with Steve Hillage guitar. The cd has quite amazing sound. I have lots of krautrock albums and this is as good as any of the best. I haven't watched the DVD, so I can't comment. I wish Echoes was in print, because I would buy that too..... Cosmic Music Fan....~


After Achim Reichel left THE RATTLES, Hamburg's famous psych pop band, he formed A.R. and MACHINES, with his first album DIE GRUNE REISE (or, THE GREEN JOURNEY). If you only know this band from the BEST OF CD that came out some years ago (ECHOS OF THE GREEN JOURNEY), you might have a misguided impression of what to expect. There are several songs on the album, with vocals. Achim edited out almost all the vocal parts from his A.R.& MACHINES albums, to create the band's BEST OF album, that became popular in the AMBIENT TRANCE circles. When the album was originally released in 1971, it was very popular in Britian, influencing many musicians to pursue this sound. Brian Eno said that the album was a major influence on his first solo album with ambient songs, ANOTHER GREEN WORLD. (And that album sure created its acolytes.) Julian Cope, who wrote KRAUTROCKSAMPLER, called THE GREEN JOURNEY "the final result of a higher awareness". Well, geez, do you think so? This album has psychedelia written all over it. Also, the songs all flow into each other, for the most part. GLOBUS has a heavy 4X4 rock beat, and a loud, freakout rock vocal on top, with the guitars not just echoing into overdub infinity, but also playing some chords. I"LL BE YOUR SINGER, YOU BE MY SONG is a folk rock song with vocals and acoustic guitar, that sounds like AMON DUUL's "PARAMECHANICAL WORLD". The lyrics on the album are in english, and are trippy/paradoxical, in the manner of the times. Since only a few songs have lyrics, it helps keep the album from sounding too monotonous. Since the basic sound is the echos of the guitar riffs, fading into infinity, getting overdubbed and matched to great drum beats, even if you DID just listen to the ambient songs, you'd hardly get bored. Maybe the best song, and certainly the most freaky, is the album closer, TRUTH AND PROBIBLITY. It sounds like a sonic fractal. This last song runs 11+ minutes, and does not flow out of the proceeding song, unlike the rest of the album's tracks. Most of the sound is produced by human voices creating every possible sound, human vocal chords CAN make. Everything from strange, microtonal melodic parts that sound exactly like Ligetti's vocal composistions from the soundtrack to 2001 A SPACE ODDYSSY, to the human voice coughing, retching, crying, it's all on this song. Except with a strong beat, and lots of guitar riffs echoing into infintiy. All together, mixing ambient sounds, rock songs, and experimental pieces, Achim produced a cult album that should be known by all Krautrock fans. Due to the rareness of the reissues of this material, if you are into this sound, or this band, you should pick up this album now, cos it wont be around much longer. 

A little word about the CD and DVD set. The remastering was done by EROC, who's GROBSCHNITT's drummer, who's recently been remastering these old Krautrock classics. Sonically, the sound is beautiful, clear and full. The set comes in a three panel cardboard container, the first panel reveals the CD, the second panel has the DVD movie/5.1 music mix, and the third panel holds the liner notes, in both German and English. Everything you'd like to know about the album's history is contained here. Besides the notes, you get the DVD which has a movie for the album, and a "MAKING OF" mini documentary, about the movie's production. However, even tho my Computer plays PAL DVDs, I can't get this DVD to play. You see, its formatted in REGION ZERO PAL. I have my computer set up to play REGION 2 PAL, and this "no-region" PAL format just doesnt play. So, if you dont have an ALL REGION DVD PLAYER, you wont be watching the film, or hearing the 5.1 mix. (What a drag!) Even tho I dont get to see the film, the music itself provokes such an amazing, synesthetic bombardment of visions, I just watch my own inner cinema. Not being able to access this DVD, is NOT a reason to ignore the CD contained in the set, bottom line. SO, who's going to enjoy this CD from 1971? I'd recommend it to ALL KRAUTROCK FANS, especially if you like Early CAN, 1970-73 period TANGERINE DREAM, or Klaus Schulze's early albums, Brian Eno's ANOTHER GREEN WORLD, or even if you like the new album by ANIMAL COLLECTIVE. The music is so inventive, so advanced for the time, that its hard to believe this album was recorded in 1970. To think all this looping of guitar "samples" was done thru an analogue Akai X-3300 tape recorder with the eraise head removed, just shows that creative technology has pushed music forward for years. This music is great, for those GREEN JOURNEYS you take late at night, to places unknown.....W.T.Hoffman .....~





“Die Grüne Reise” (‘The Green Journey’) doesn’t sound like the handiwork of one person, but this first solo album of Achim Reichel’s is exactly that. He wrote all the tracks, played all the instruments, and produced the entire scene himself (Actually, make that co-produced with Frank Dostal, who also penned the English lyrics within and had previously done time with Reichel in the popular West German beatgruppe, The Rattles.) And since its ‘realization’ is credited to A.R. himself, it would seem obvious that the album was more or less his effort and his alone. The refined qualities dash from the ridiculous to the sublime in a place where wordless vocals rhythmically run amok alongside trance-inducing interplay of multi-overdubbed guitars as the background fill of bass and drums, then percussion and acoustic guitar are all tweaked into a Möbius strip of interconnectedness plotted to perfection. For whether it is a signal or signal as repeated echo, all lands rhythmically assured on their assigned and intended position despite the dense amount of sonic looping at work. 

Despite such potentially confusing effects at play, Reichel exhibits a skillful juggling act of sound on “Die Grüne Reise.” It is the end result of the kind of heightened awareness that goes beyond merely coaxing results from equipment (as only the most committed technicians do) to making that leap to communicating directly with his equipment and operating in a specific place where the interfacing going down is at such a basic and mutual level that it is the distance between the source (Reichel’s untreated guitar lines) and the result (the echoed playback) that Reichel seems to be playing as much as the guitar AND its echoed counterpart. Parlaying this mental, three-dimensional game of ping-pong with innumerable multi-tracking of further guitars along with the supporting instrumentation at a variety of shades and strengths, it’s a marvel to behold the breadth of Reichel’s vision at work here (He even paid tribute to this relationship by whittling his own name down to two initials and credited the record to ‘A.R. & Machines’.) And then there’s the vocalising -- Which one cannot even begin to describe, let alone conjecture exactly HOW he made it all fit together so harmonious it sounds as complete as if the entire album sprouted from his head fully formed or if the tool that draws from the impulses of the human brain is fed directly into the equipment in a marriage of electricity stamped directly upon the output...in a rhythmically-based latticework with many simple layers comprehensively distributed throughout with a Teutonic sense of organisation. 

And if you think that’s a head full, it’s nothing compared to the record itself for it is one seriously giddy experience. Although Reichel’s following “Echo” LP was twice as long and even fathoms deeper, “Die Grüne Reise” was where the idiosyncratic world of A.R. & Machines first assembled and took to flight, flow and funnel all at once. (It would be disingenuous to label the majority content here as a mere milk run for the navigating vision Reichel so wonderfully finalised on “Echo.” Although the tracks do exhibit the same filigreed expansiveness with respect to the use of sound layering via multi-guitar overdubs Reichel pushed through delay to yield rhythmically rich textures and a similar predetermined energy flows with fluid and precise assembly, I can only conclude that without the arduous procedures Reichel undertook single-handedly with the writing, arranging and recording “Die Grüne Reise,” along with its comparative amount of studio and compositional lessons learned, “Echo” would never have existed so I view them as equally burning achievements.) 

A final bizarre note is that this album was conceived (and quite possibly, undelivered) in the unlikely form of a film soundtrack, as the back sleeve notes ‘The Green Journey: Sound Track to the intended motion picture.’ Judging from some of the lyrics and song titles, it would appear to be for a religious-themed film. But if the producer had in mind a treatment more in keeping with the saleable fad of religion-based pop operas soon personified with the trilogy of “Godspell,” “Jesus Christ Superstar” and “Joseph And The Amazing Technicolor Dream Coat” (throw in their more secular roots that first germinated on “Hair” and “Tommy” and you have the top five candidates for the turntables of growing legions of flipped out flower children that had switched from unsuccessfully trying to find god in a sugar cube after innumerable misses to the more widely accepted means of studying the New Testament -- during their successful completion of drug rehabilitation programs) then he would have been sorely disappointed. 

Not to mention overwhelmed. For this album was no such methadone clinic in LP form because Reichel had no Broadway aspirations and was already leagues ahead in innovative sound arrangements with far-reaching possibilities that what he wound up producing was deeply coursing music that weaved through myriad forms and spaces without ever getting lost in the process while simultaneously surfing several depths of the electric ocean in sound. The front sleeve of the album depicts Reichel’s image faintly reflected from inside a green marble parked gently in-between his Muse’s lips that kaleidoscopically refract all around and is a keen representation of the delayed, layering techniques applied throughout. Multi-tracking and echo are manipulated with a detailed weight that practically turn them into instruments themselves, as they wield and yield a battery of effects to the proceedings. 

Side one is a suite of seven tracks crossfaded with the umbrella title, “Ich Bin (Fröhliche Abenteurer für Sinne, Geist und Triebe)” and in English translates into “I Am (Happy Adventures For Senses, Mind, And Inclination).” Organised into four separate ‘stations,’ the constant bleeding and continuous merging of reoccurring themes and parallel motifs weave in and out more as waves of particles pulsating through various wormholes of space and sound with millipede-like proportion than the by-product of a West German longhair playing looped e-guitar sequences. It is as dense as it is economical and so evenly paced that the 20 minutes of side one manages to feel half the time in length despite (or because) there is so much going on. After a brief introductory passage, the first ‘happy adventure’ is the main theme that kicks into a triple time with triple guitars laying down a galloping passage as percussion hitches a ride at full speed, pounding the earth under its hooves as it approaches “In The Same Boat.” Here, phased hi-hatting and a punked-up “Spirit In The Sky” lead rhythm guitar riff gets spat out with the first verses running short and tersely repeated: “All/Love all...All/Kiss all...” until it trails off into the vocals getting slowed down, sped up and extending into a flurry of high pitched, agape vox as Reichel slowly intonates and clues us in beforehand: “Understand-ing/The sudden/End-ing...” Which, by the way, is how both sides of the album conclude. The airlock opens and the main theme comes spilling out once again, this time with further deftly handled guitar overdubs and Synthi-A lines that are dazzlingly echoed. Drums savagely break in but oddly do not commit with any sense of discord. “Beautiful Babylon” sees a quiet interlude of relaxed beauty emerge, but is soon touched by a growing awareness that soon evolves into a sorrowful reflection on Babylon’s skin-deep beauty, simmering gently into cymbals and an acoustic guitar strumming against further percussion comprised of fish belly, congas, handclaps as Reichel goofs, “Hello!...Hahaha...Huh?” and proceeds into “I’ll Be Your Singer, You Be My Song.” Located somewhere in feel to a less organic version of Can’s “T.V. Spot” crossed with the rhythmic repetitions of their earlier “Yoo Doo Right,” it may very well Reichel addressing the relationship he shares with his Muse, the tools of his creation or quite possibly, just the rest of the universe. 

“Body” is a percussion-laden instrumental that builds with multi-tracked guitars playing tightly-knit cross-patterns as prominent bass and vocal gibbering joins into a conga line. As it starts building, it also funnels into a tight yet spacious arrangement of deeply echoed chords that quickly shudder and fall to gravity’s pull as it segues into the brief “A Book’s Blues.” A slow and single bluesy guitar much like Ash Ra Tempel’s “Downtown” enters with finger snapping, drums and bass falling in backing the song’s one and only verse and consequently ends with another pull of gravity. Segueing into the seventh and final track, “....Als Hätte Ich Das Alles Schon Mal Gesehen” (“....As If I Have Seen All This Before”) a wonderland of echo returns as vocals cry and are echoed to next Donnerstag and back without missing a beat among rapped bongo skins and vocal things. The main guitar theme returns to flatten the plains on horseback once again and drums start up with a great clatter that in turn sets off the crystal machine Synthi-A with great reverb that transcendentally breaks it all apart. Once it calms and settles down a lone guitar is struck several times and sways in its tracks. The introduction from the side’s beginning throws the old dénouement switch as if to regroup, but it’s too late for all gets quickly swamped yet again by a passing cloud of more fantastically echoed Synthi-A. The drums shoot up once more into clamour, but the sonic stew is finally set to simmer. A guitar gently disassembles, plink...plink...plink...Until Reichel stomps on the foot pedal to draw to a close the epic first side with a ‘sudden/end-ing.’ 

“Cosmic Vibration (An Afternoon-Concert)” commences the second side, building with successive layers just added and added from one guitar line to five (ten? twenty??) as percussion and bass easily adhere to its predetermined rhythmic girding. Cymbals hit and signal the piece’s ascent across the horizon. Several guitars vie within the boundaries of the predetermined sonicscape to split off into faked double-trackedness with a pair of different guitars performing the same riff. Once this has fallen away, a skeletal “Hurricane Fighter Plane” rhythm guitar weaves in followed by cowbell and then shakers and begins wending off into the repetitive and echoed unknown. Soon, crystal machine Synthi-A is awakened, discharging a glittery snowfall that dusts the piece and ushers it into crossfade with the most song-oriented moment of the album, “Come On, People.” It’s a secular revival meeting/street anthem played on madly strummed acoustic guitar set to a Bo Diddley rhythm with metronomic high-hatting. If there was a cameo for Reichel in the film that was never made, it would be this song and he’d be be-robe on a sunset mount above a crowd of assembled groovers. Melody vocal effects darken the approaching horizon while subtle vocal treatments whizz by, oscillating and manipulated into synthesizer-like cooing. 

“Truth And Probability (A Lexicon For Self-Knowledge)” is the weighty title for the album’s massive finale and is the place that most obviously points the way to the heady excursions Reichel would next achieve on “Echo.” Tiny bells strike over a guitar pattern that nudges along and is shored up by its brother echo riff with the speed and curled motion of feathers floating downward. A flurry of guitar rises gently in molecular amassment then edges into sustained feedback as vocal freakery enters to remains for the rest of the piece. And oh how it remains. It’s the “Surfin’ Bird” midsection on laughing gas in an echo chamber/hall of mirrors, stereo-panned and multi-tracked to make it seem like hundreds of little Achims prattling on/off and off/on at the speed of speaking in tongues for all his combined ancestors/future descendants all once. These vocal noises stretch, condense and extend into symphonies of wordless vocalese that build up, break down and spread out over guitar feedback and bass auxiliaries that needle and dive-bomb from the rear. The vocals go into in freefall and still manages to keep to the rhythm, despite being echoed to the four (times four) corners of oblivion with crying, laughing, cawing, you name it. Reichel even manages to approximate a water tap dripping. And it’s all Echoed...echoed...echoed... Like a Ligeti vocal score recorded by a bunch of short attention span cadets behind his back. There’s a slowdown into further realms of Überchatterung until the whole labyrinth lurches to an abrupt close with a final ‘sudden/end-ing’ and the silence is deafening.....Head Heritage.....~


The Green Desert is a phenomenal debut, a fully realized Work of Art that propels the listener on a metaphysical journey thru the nuances of their self-identity, culminating in a sonic recreation of Jacques Lacan's "mirror stage" entitled "Truth and Probability." Unlike Manuel Gottsching who employed echo-guitar to suggest the vastness of the external world (outer space and nature), and Gunter Schickert who used echo-guitar to replicate the rhythms and feelings of the modern city, A. R. made echo-guitar a tool to plumb the depths of the inner psyche, bringing to light the shared collectivity we keep buried within....Phallus_Dei ....~



This is definitely Krautrock but unlike most contemporaries that were distancing themselves from the blues and rock influences of the 60s, A.R. & MACHINES fully utilized a blues based guitar sound on this album. What makes this so trippy is that they added guitar loops, effects and feedback like there's no tomorrow. It can sound like a very accessible sound one moment and then suddenly burst into extremely trippy worlds where the only thing that's for sure is that echos and feedback are plentiful, but all with an underlying catchiness. 

Achim Reichel (A.R.) started out in Germany quite innocently as a pop-star in the beat group The Rattles in the 60s and actually played alongside The Beatles at a few points. They were successful on the charts in several countries and were the first German group to ever hit the charts in the US. After many years of doing the pop thing, Achim opted for something different. Something very different. Taking with him the pop sensibilities of his past, he added a healthy dose of surreality and trippiness making this debut as A.R. & THE MACHINES one strange bird. 

This was an instant classic for me as I love the combo effect of the accessible and the strangeness. The highlight for me is the final cut Wahrheit Und Wahrscheinlichkeit (Truth And Probabilty) which has to be THE most tripped out piece of music ever. It is all echo all the time with Mr Reichel basically yelping out whatever strikes his fancy at the moment with the occasional guitar breaking in for a little break. This fantastic album satisfies my innermost psychedelic needs time and time again. One of the most tripped out albums in existence!....siLLy_puPPy ....~




Die Grune Reise (The Green Journey) is a fantastic debut released in 1971, a great year for both Krautrock and Prog Rock. This was my second album by A.R. and the Machines, and by no means a disappointment after the celestial bliss that is Echo. After hearing the first two albums by them, I was convinced that Krautrock is much more than just "experimental, random noises" like I once thought it was. A.R. and the Machines are my favorite Krautrock band at the moment, and although I'm still relatively new to the genre, this is saying a lot because many of the other, more popular, bands are excellent as well. 

Such a shame this band isn't more popular, which is one reason I'm reviewing them. All their albums are in desperate need of CD reissues, since they are only available in this format as bootlegs or as expensive, out of print, issues from other countries. Of course, LP would be the best option, but they're hard to find and pricey. 

Like Echo and the rest of their discography, Die Grune Reise is structured around the echo guitar playing of Achim Reichel. If you like guitar-driven Krautrock, this is the album for you! It is sung mostly in English, with a bit of German thrown in. I really enjoy Achim Reichel's voice, especially in A.R. and the Machines. Like Echo, there is quite a bit of vocal experimentation in this album, but it is never overbearing. Somewhat accessible compared to Echo, and perhaps one of the more accessible Kraut albums I've heard thus far. Don't get me wrong, this is still a challenging album that will require a few listens to sink in, just not to the extent of other Krautrock. I'm not sure how popular this album was in Germany, but a single was made out of "I'll be Your Singer, You' be my Song / Come on People" which are both catchy, but still great. 

There isn't anything negative about this album, I'm just not going to give it a full 5 stars like Echo because the debut isn't quite as dynamic. Still, it's a 4.5 star album that is definitely an "Excellent addition to any prog music collection" mainly for fans of '70s spacey and psychedelic music with an emphasis on guitar. If you are a fan of Krautrock album, Die Grune Reise is a must, as is everything else by this band........SkiesToInfinity .....~



When it comes to adopting international musical styles it’s easy to see that Achim Reichel was slightly ahead of his (German) times: He founded The Rattles, the ‘German Beatles’, in 1960, toured England briefly with The Rolling Stones and Bo Diddley in 1963 and supported The Beatles in Germany in 1966. During the early and mid-1960’s The Rattles had a few hits and became more and more popular when Reichel had to join the German Bundeswehr in 1967 and his career as a musician was put on hold. Coming back from the military service he grew his hair and recorded “Die grüne Reise” in 1970. It was released in 1971, the same year as the first Ash Ra Tempel. 

Maybe it’s because of Reichel’s age (he slightly older than Schulze or Göttsching, for example) or it’s because of the fact that “Die grüne Reise” (the green journey) was recorded in Hamburg, where Reichel lives until this day – but A.R. & Machines are strangely disconnected from the Krautrock canon. In Munich there was Amon Düül and in Berlin the eponymous school (Ash Ra Tempel, Tangerine Dream, Cluster…) for example – people who formed different groups and played together in various combinations. Achim Reichel remained alienated from all these actions and listening to “Die grüne Reise” I ask myself why? Maybe just because he wanted to be on his own. (The back-cover of the record pictures Reichel standing solely in front of a setting sun.) 

The music on “Die grüne Reise” is not unlike some early Ash Ra Tempel or some Amon Düül – but it’s a solo-record and because of that it bears similarities to Göttsching’s “Blackouts” or “Inventions For Electric Guitar” – not to speak of Reichel’s “Echoes” from 1972, which sounds like the musical template for Göttsching’s “Inventions…”. But by the time of Göttsching’s “Inventions…” Reichel was already off the psychedelic plane and released a record consisting of Shanty music. 

Reichel’s musical journey remains a bizarre Sonderweg in the history of Krautrock – but for the most part it’s a journey to enjoy. “Die grüne Reise” is a colourful and diverse record (the sleazy guitar riff on “In The Same Boat” sandwiched between “Globus” and “Beautiful Babylon” is a hilarious aberration – at least when it comes to the average expectations when putting on a ‘psychedelic’ record). Its ten fluffy psychedelic tracks wear the obvious signs of the times, but they still sound fresh. “I’ll Be Your Singer” is a folky-trippy ditty with slightly goofy faux-philosophical lyrics, “Body” another fine echo-guitar-etude blending into a laid-back “Book Of Blues”. And that’s just the first side of “Die grüne Reise”… 

Flipping the record “Cosmic Vibration” radiates from the vinyl, so what are you waiting for? Take the trip – the green journey awaits you!.... by YorkshireNed.....~


5 stars This is definitely Krautrock but unlike most contemporaries that were distancing themselves from the blues and rock influences of the 60s, A.R. & MACHINES fully utilized a blues based guitar sound on this album. What makes this so trippy is that they added guitar loops, effects and feedback like there's no tomorrow. It can sound like a very accessible sound one moment and then suddenly burst into extremely trippy worlds where the only thing that's for sure is that echos and feedback are plentiful, but all with an underlying catchiness.
Achim Reichel (A.R.) started out in Germany quite innocently as a pop-star in the beat group The Rattles in the 60s and actually played alongside The Beatles at a few points. They were successful on the charts in several countries and were the first German group to ever hit the charts in the US. After many years of doing the pop thing, Achim opted for something different. Something very different. Taking with him the pop sensibilities of his past, he added a healthy dose of surreality and trippiness making this debut as A.R. & THE MACHINES one strange bird. 

This was an instant classic for me as I love the combo effect of the accessible and the strangeness. The highlight for me is the final cut Wahrheit Und Wahrscheinlichkeit (Truth And Probabilty) which has to be THE most tripped out piece of music ever. It is all echo all the time with Mr Reichel basically yelping out whatever strikes his fancy at the moment with the occasional guitar breaking in for a little break. This fantastic album satisfies my innermost psychedelic needs time and time again. One of the most tripped out albums in existence!.....~



There are three prime figures in German music for the echo guitar: Manuel Göttsching, Gunter Schickert, and, here, Achim Reichel. A lot of great music was made with this technique of using echo pedals, where lines played become the next bar's accompaniment. Die Grüne Reise, aka The Green Journey, was one of the first albums largely based on the technique and it was a brilliant and fresh take on psychedelic music, not only with its layering of echo guitars but with a similar approach to vocals. Whether Reichel was going for straight up experimentation or crafting more melodically inclined music, many of the ideas here were quite unique for the time with a strange quirkiness and sense of humor that gave much of it a playful edge. Honestly the only real question here is why the reissue series stopped at the debut when A.R. and his Machines went on to record four or five more great albums that varied his approach to the guitar and music. But it all started here...by Mike McLatchey....~





Credits 

Composed by Achim Reichel 
Music by Achim Reichel 
Instruments Achim Reichel 
Design R. Pfingsten 
Engineer Claus Schuster 
Lyrics by Frank Dostal 
Photography by Jens EhlersJacques SchumacherFrank Dostal 
Producer Achim ReichelFrank Dostal




Tracklist 

Ich Bin (Fröhliche Abenteuer Für Sinne, Geist Und Triebe) - I Am (Happy Adventures For Senses, Mind, And Inclination)
Station 1: Globus / Im Selben Boot (In The Same Boat)
Station 2: Schönes Babylon (Beautiful Babylon)
Ich Bin Dein Sänger. Du Bist Mein Lied (I'll Be Your Singer. You'll Be My Song)
Station 3: Body (A Book's Blues)
Station 4: ....Als Hätte Ich Das Alles Schon 'Mal Gesehen. (....As If I Have Seen All This Before.)
Cosmic Vibration (Ein Nachmittags-Konzert) - (An Afternoon Concert)
Come On, People
Wahrheit Und Wahrscheinlichkeit (Ein Lexikon Zur Selbsterkenntnis) - Truth And Probability (A Lexicon For Self-Knowledge) 





Monday, 14 October 2019

Masters Of Reality "Sunrise On The Sufferbus"1992 US Blues Rock,Hard Rock (feat Ginger Baker)


Masters Of Reality "Sunrise On The Sufferbus"1992 US Blues Rock,Hard Rock (feat Ginger Baker)

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On the one hand it must have seemed like a perversely appropriate gesture on the part of Chris Goss. Having received a variety of comparisons to Cream after Masters of Reality's first album came out, thanks in large part to Goss' vocal resemblance to Jack Bruce, none other than legendary British drummer and Cream veteran Ginger Baker took over the sticks on the group's sophomore effort. Far from being mere wish-fulfillment, though, Baker's abilities help supercharge the mighty and underrated Sunrise on the Sufferbus to a higher level. Baker's lost none of his power -- indeed, arguably he hasn't sounded this good in years, showing flash and flair while never replicating, say, the drum-solo mistakes of "Toad" -- while both Goss and Googe have their instruments like men possessed. The result is fiery, smoking rock in a classic vein, rescuing the genre from the dullard efforts that groups like the Black Crowes were plaguing listeners with; even by-the-numbers blues-rock struts like "V.H.V." have a sharp, immediate kick to them. Goss' singing still has hints of Bruce, as well as Neil Young, but doesn't just replicate -- consider the smooth flow of "J.B. Witchdance," where he has a great crisp talk/sing style at play -- while the band's production as a whole brings out the immediacy of the songs. The emphasis on calmer efforts like the dreamy string-and-keyboard drenched "100 Years" and the enjoyable, steady lope of "Rolling Green" provide a fine contrast to the amped-up kickers. There's a great ringer in the middle of the album courtesy of Baker, "T.U.S.A." With spoken-word lyrics from Baker himself decrying the inability of Americans to make tea properly ("Pour boiling water over the tea/How simple and clear/Can the instructions be?"), it's the type of relaxed joke more self-conscious bands wouldn't dare try, but which the trio effortlessly turns into a great little song.....by Ned Raggett....~


Another very good hard blues rock recording from this terrific band. They sound like they were from the early 70's but that is not the case. I am guessing Mr. Baker may have a little to do with their overall sound but damn this is good rock. Lots of wailing ripping guitar with fantastic bass/drum are on every track. 

So, catch a buzz, close your eyes and be transported back in time to when Deep Purple, Mountain, Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, and Cream reigned supreme....by...rod45 .....~


I had no idea about these guys until I saw "Beware of Mr. Baker," a documentary that I highly recommend. I also highly recommend this album. It's very solid all around. Good material, good vocals, great musicianship, great production, and a lot of variety. They can go from raunchy boogie ("She Got Me") to heavy metal blues ("V.I.V.') to a song that could have been on a Beatles album ("Jody Sings"). Ginger Baker's drums are mixed up high but are never intrusive. I don't remember enjoying his drumming this much on the Cream albums, but his drumming on this album is outstanding--very propulsive and inventive--a real pleasure to listen to. I think his drums are also recorded better than on any of the Cream albums or the Blind Faith albums, which certainly helps....by...moochie ....~


A quite strange album, with musical inspiration from many genres, mixing vintage with modern, always with a great groove. The duo bass/drums is outstanding, especially on the tracks "J.B. Witchdance " , "T.U.S.A" and "Rabbit One". These tracks are more bass driven, and are my favourites from the record. There are also a few more bluesy tracks, or more Hard Rock-oriented ones, for short, it suits all tastes, and all is mixed perfectly, with the addition of the style of Chris Goss, that I couldn't define precisely. 
Very interesting thus......by....TheBrain .....~

Probably the most unnoticed and hence underrated masterpiece in rock history. I still believe that mankind will solve over-population and global warming and be able to colonize the nearby planets and Sunrise on the Sufferbus will sell 10 million copies and be a stable in the top 10 of the critics' polls of alltime greatest rock records...by...vdgg9.....~


Fans of Cream's best material (i.e., Jack Bruce's songs) and Ginger Baker's drumming will be blown away by this undeservedly obscure offering. Chris Goss, MOR's very talented lead singer, guitarist, and songwriter penned several great Bruce-ish songs for SOTSB, ranging from dark and panoramic to driving and comic, and Baker is in top form. This is clearly the best rock recording ginger has been in involved with since Cream and Blind Faith, and at its best, MOR rivals either band......~


"It's been an evolving musical expedition.. .like a rock 'n roll obstacle course." Lead vocalist CHRIS GOSS is talking about the many incarnations of MASTERS OF REALITY, the brilliantly innovative rock band that has changed the world's perception of what makes rock "classic." 

1980: upstate New York—the cold climate and upstate-collegiate atmosphere lent itself to be a surprisingly excellent starting point for the band. Remembers Chris, "l held other Jobs— everything from managing discos to spinning records and designing restaurants." 
To let off steam and keep from being smothered by the boredom, Chris, Tim Harrington and high school chum GOOGE, began playing together in a band, which eventually was called MASTERS OF REALITY (the drummer Vinnie Ludovico joins the group later). 
Googe continues "the original MASTERS OF REALITY used tape-looped drums, black lights, fog and strobes. After a while, they wanted to expand, so they asked me to play keyboards. 
Chris Jooked like Marion Brando in 'Apocolypse Now'—this big, shaved-headedloomingfigureonstage. That went on for a couple of years - 'Central New York's Favorite Halloween Band.' Later, the songs changed, we got a drummer, and l started playing bass." "This was actually my original instrument." Chris adds, "In 1980/1981 , there were a lot of Punk snobs around leftover from the 70's. Bands like Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath weren't in vogue anymore, if you named your band after a Black Sabbath album, then all it would do is turn off all the Vight' people — so it was good if they didn't like the name — it was their problem." 

Eight years of hard club gigging in New York State ensued, leaving MASTERS OF REALITY's audiences transcendent. Continues Chris, "In order to really stand out like a sore thumb in Syracuse we put on a cool, weird show. 
We had this mystical image, and we were trying to scare the pants off of everybody, which we did, many times." However, Chris points out, this is definitely no longer the case in the current MASTERS OF REALITY credo. "It was good for a while, but then you get tired of playing a role. l'd rather be myself musically." 

The guitar is the root of MASTERS OF REALITY's music. Chris says "l played all kinds of guitar-oriented rock, l've played since l was 15, and my art-hero is still Jimmy Page. And after about 4 or 5 years, l started writing songs with both guitar and keyboards, and that was the beginning of MASTERS OF REALITY." 
Googe agrees with the Zep influence himself. "You gotta know John Paul Jones and Geezer Butler [of Black Sabbath] were 'it' when l was growing up. l mean, how many times did l listen to those albums? 
l know every note. And from the jazz field, l like Ray Brown, Scott Lafaro who played with Ornette Coleman, Cecil McBee and Bill Evans, l looked up to them as far as style and melody on bass." 

During those years between 1980 and 1988, MASTERS OF REALITY found themselves playing at one point in New York City, and caught the ear of zen producer and label head Rick Rubin. 
At the time, says Googe, "Rick had gotten a copy of our demo through our original manager in New York City." In late 1987, the original MASTERS OF REALITY were signed to Rick's Def Jam label, and later in 1988, were moved over to his new label, Def-American Recordings. 
Caught in the middle of new label negotiations and general bureaucratic red tape, the band tried to tour behind their self-titled debut Def-American LP, but it proved unsuccessful. "We were at each others' throats," says Chris. "Everything was uncomfortable and distasteful." The original lineup split up. Traveling to Los Angeles, Chris and Googe met with Rick's good friend and LA DJ/producer-turned label owner Matt Dike, who, along with young mogul Mike Ross, headed up the fledgling rap Delicious Vinyl label, horne to Tone-Loc and Young MC. Matt wanted to sign a solid rock band, Chris wanted to re-release the album, and both had their wishes granted when MASTERS OF REALITY's debut re-introduced itself to the masses in the summer of 1990. 
This time, however, the album included more music—namely the song "Doraldina's Prophecies," a hit on the College radio circuit and favorite among in-the-know critics.
It was around this time that Chris and Googe met up with legendary Cream founder and drummer GINGER BAKER, through, of all things, one of Ginger's polo partners. 
"We met at a barbecue," Chris recounts. "The Suggestion of a jam session happened, and l thought, 'Great drummer. This'll be a cool jam.' We played for six or seven hours. After that, l think we all knew. We were smiling from ear-to-ear. Ginger understood—it was happening stuff." 
"My wife convinced me to do this jam," says Ginger. "I didn't want to do it at all. And afterwards, l was totally amazed, especially with Chris." 
Keeping in contact and becoming fast friends, Ginger became a permanent member within a week of their meeting. Raves Chris of Ginger, "His drumming has its own melody, his whole kit moves within all these counter-rhythms. 
It's a great thing for a musician and songwriter to have to work behind, because Ginger lends so many angles to be looked at." Agrees Googe, "It's real easy for the three of us to just sit down and plug in—Ginger cranking his drum set up, and we could just play all night. Playing with him is just like you'd imagine. l remember the first time he said he was going to come over and jam. l was totally nervous. 
l think l dranka six-packof Bud Light in 5 minutes. When you're playing with people of quality, your own Standard goes up too. But it's really the three of us together—the 'trio' idea, that makes this album and band so special." I´m the one who is the most practical," says Ginger. "Someone's got to have their feet on the ground. l mean, Chris is extremely creative, but sometimes you have to pull things down to Earth a bit. This is how people work together. It's a chemistry that works." 

For the new album, SUNRISE ON THE SUFFERBUS. all three members contribute their writing and producing skills. In recording the new album, Ginger recalls, "In the two years that it's taken to record this album, we've endured a lot of hardship, and so it's a great relief to finally be going forward." 
To Chris, however, the album title sounds more hopeful than disdainful. "It actually came from playing cards on our tourbus, around the clock until early in the morning - hence, 'Sunrise On The Sufferbus.'" 

The future? "The music we're making - me, Chris & Ginger - is amazing, incredible to me," says Googe. 

And what does Chris hope for most with SUNRISE ON THE SUFFERBUS? Answering simply and honestly, "l hope that melody makes a comeback." 
Does a seasoned musician such as Ginger Baker feel he is a teacher or a Student as a member of MASTERS OF REALITY? T m both," he says, "and that's what it's all about, isn't it?"....~


Chris Goss is mainly known for his excellent production work with Kyuss and his role in the QOTSA camp as producer and player. Before all this, Goss made awesome records under his own Masters of Reality flag. The first album (produced by Rick Rubin) was an absolute stone classic (buy it!). Imagine Cream possessing the bodies of the Blue Oyster Cult, whilst Hendrix fiddles in the background. After a short period in the wilderness after parting with DefAmerican recordings, Goss returned with this beauty of an album. The Cream comparisons were potent enough to tempt Ginger Baker to join as a full time member. The psychedelia, weirdness and overall groovyness were racheted up as far it would go. Songs about the 'inability of yanks to make a good cup of tea', cycling around at night and ants in the kitchen are hallmarks of the whackiness of this album. Recently in Mojo's lost classics top 100....Moonchief.....~

Chris Goss, composer and vocalist for Masters of Reality, has got a lot of stripes on his arm. He's produced for Kyuss and a whole host of other bands. He's created some of the heaviest stoner/dessert rock there is and he's done a damn fine job of doing it. 
Loving Kyuss and I knew Goss' name from sleeve notes and was interested to hear his own work - if you like Kyuss and other bands of that ilk, there's little to fear. Not as heavy or riffy as most stoner rock, this work is a little more restrained - with the quality of the songs though, it matters not. 
This album is brilliant and there are moments where you feel you can hear the roots of stoner rock sprouting up all around you. Its Rock like Rock is supposed to be. 
Later work features Nick Oliveri and many others attached to the central stoner rock movement..... L. Savidis....~


"Sunrise on the sufferbus" is one of the finest records ever. It combines the sheer genius of Chris Goss (guitar/vocals) with ex-Cream sticksman and all around blues legend Ginger Baker, and Bass master Googe. From the opening track, "She Got Me (when she go her dress on)" to the closing "The Moon In Your Pocket", you are taken on a blissfully moving journey. It's like 14 dreams recorded for listening pleasure. There is so much that could be praised about this album: the tear jerking melody to the heart warming blues of songs such as "V.H.V." echoing early 'Cream'. Comparisons can be made to other artists such as Pink Floyd, Mark Lanegan and Led Zepplin for the song writing, structure and melody used. Don't get me wrong though, this is a totally original style of music and I don't think it would be fair to put a tag on it. There are bits of everything here: blues, reggae, folk, metal. 
My advice to anyone is to purchase this record, then put it on a portable CD player. Take it outside to a secluded place on a sunny evening, sit with your friends and soak up the utopian pleasure..... kieran.....~

When you name your band after a Black Sabbath album, but aren’t really a metal band and instead play the kind of bluesy hard rock that was the precursor to metal, you’re already stacking the deck against yourself a bit. 

And so nobody really knew what to make of Masters of Reality’s self-titled debut album, both in 1988 when it was originally released and in its 1990 re-release. After all, it didn’t really fit during the hairmetal heyday, but it wasn’t quite as out there as Jane’s Addiction or an undeniable as Guns N’ Roses. So it made a small splash, but not much more. 

And that was when things got weird: given that the lead Master, guitarist & songwriter Chris Goss sounded just like Jack Bruce, it only made sense that they recruit Ginger Baker to play drums. 


And so, with Baker on board, they recorded 1992’s Sunrise on the Sufferbus, a record that was even more out of step than their debut, and a quarter-century later still doesn’t sound like anything else. With Baker’s drums leading the way, many of the songs were an unique combination of piledriving guitar and lighter-than-air rhythms. 

The best tunes included Ginger Baker bitching about American tea, the near doo-wop closer, and a 38-second string-laden question to the biggest pop star in the world that stands as one of my favorite songs of the decade. 

But it opens with the roiling, rollicking “She Got Me (When She Got Her Dress On),” which starts with Baker beating the ever-loving shit out of his snare drum while Goss sings about a love object who won him over not by taking off her clothes, but rather putting them on. Or a specific piece, that is. 

Halfway through, Goss uncorks a guitar solo that is basically the equivalent of Baker’s drum pattern, and for a short moment in time, they’re both buzzsawing against each other, neither giving an inch, until Goss finally blinks, almost shaking his head in admiration at what Baker’s doing. 

Later on, he tries again, and manages to wrestle Baker’s drums to the ground just as the song thuds to a close. It’s a great way to open a weird, wonderful, eclectic record that I think sound better now that it did 25 years ago. 

Oh, and if I ever open a Real Estate office, I’m totally going to call it “Masters of Realty.”....BY JIM CONNELLY.......~


Also sometimes referred to as The Blue Garden for it's distinctive cover artwork featuring a decidedly creepy twilight scene, Masters of Reality seemed desperately out of step when it appeared in January 1989. That it was forced to share column space with the likes of Roxx Gang, Exodus and Skid Row's eponymous debut illustrates how little the Syracuse, New York-based quartet had in common with their contemporaries of the day. MOR did, however, have Rick Rubin fighting their cause after the producer / Def American owner had discovered the band playing a gig in a Lower East Side fleapit called The Pyramid. Masters of Reality became the predominantly rap label's first rock release. 

By that time, Masters of Reality had already been banging their heads against immovable metaphorical walls for almost seven years. Named, of course, after Black Sabbath's legendary third album, and already into their 30s by the time their breakthrough arrived, the band found themselves cast as square pegs into round holes. Early reviews were good, equating them with The Doors, Frank Zappa and The Mothers, Led Zeppelin, ZZ Top and even Emerson Lake and Palmer. At first it seemed as though Rubin's patronage would be useful, but away from specialist rock titles they were either dismissed as Sabbath impersonators or hopelessly outdated Goths. 

While there could be no denying the quartet's retro roots, one listen to the album was all it took to confirm that they were doing something truly exciting with a bunch of unashamedly ancient influences. Many of Goss and Harrington's riffs had the gooey consistency of treacle, but were not as sickly sweet. And although the album was comprised of haunting hooks and carefully created textures, it also threw curveballs at a moment's notice. It would be too simplistic to tag them as Sabbath covering The Beatles, yet in layman's terms that's effectively what was going on in the deep grooves of songs like 'Gettin' High' and 'The Eyes of Texas'. 

However, the album's overriding strength is still it's sheer diversity. While opener 'The Candy Song' quickly set the scene with a blend of psychedelic vocals and Zep-style power, many of the album's other songs left journalists scrambling in the dust as they attempted to make comparisons. Somehow, 'Domino' and the mysterious 'Doraldina's Prophecies' sounded like numerous other acts that the listener was momentarily able to pinpoint, but then they were like nothing else at all. 

On paper, MOR also seemed like a fascinating bunch. Harrington, who co-wrote the songs, descibed himself in the accompanying biography as "kingly"; Ludovico claimed to be "a reincaration of Mussolini - in a nice kind of way"; Goss, meanwhile, professed to have set up the band in order to "fill the void... between Dave Mason and Paul McCartney". 

That's all water under the bridge, because in 2001 Goss is all that now remains of the original band. The intervening years have also seen him producing the likes of Queens Of The Stone Age and Scott Weiland. Goss remains a mythical figure who always appears poised on the precipice of the big time, although earlier this month a line-up that included Josh Homme and Nick Oliveri from QOTSA toured the UK. Both of Goss' proteges have now gone on to become bigger attractions than the original Master. Listen to Masters of Reality and that's more perplexing than ever. [Dave Ling].....~

Masters of Reality have conjured a fantasy land for Sixties-bred acid eaters and their tie-dyed progeny. Sunrise on the Sufferbus takes its name from the chronic insomnia that left singer-guitarist Chris Goss and drummer Ginger Baker greeting the sun through bus windows on the band's 1989 tour. But more than sleep deprivation induced the Masters' refreshing hallucinosis. Their sound is also a matter of refinement and a determination to fuse melodies with the psychedelic power blues of Cream and other heavy-mannered trip-rock antecedents. 

Baker, who signed on for that tour and stayed, is an obvious reason this trio sounds Creamier than on its debut, Masters of Reality, which due to label complications was released in 1988 and again in 1990. His playing elevates these songs beyond the appealing, bestial blues rock of the Masters' first college-radio hit 'Doraldina's Prophecies'. On the new single 'She Got Me (When She Got Her Dress On)' and other cuts, Baker's sticks tap out impeccable time-keeping, cross-stitched with counterrhythms and brilliant fills. And Goss' singing has sweetened enough that he's often a ringer for Baker's old band mate Jack Bruce. 

Baker's elegant command gives Goss and bassist Googe limitless freedom, which they wisely refuse. Discipline makes this an ideal soundtrack for spin-dancing in grassy fields (and may explain why the mellotron textures recall early King Crimson). Googe plays it supportive, laying rich-toned lines deep at the bottom of the sonic well. Goss is a ripping guitarist, yet his riffs and solos, including the cock-rock screamer he uncorks in 'She Got Me', always thrive on a few hummable notes. 

Even lyrics surrender meaning to melody. Many, like those of 'V.H.V.' and 'She Got Me', are little more than mantras. Others are goofy surrealist doggerel, like the line "Stuck in Indiana with a bug in my banana" from 'Ants in the Kitchen', a song that's already captivated David Lynch. There's also a cheeky acoustic ode to Madonna, with Goss wondering aloud if she's lonely, asking, "Do you really want to be a bad girl, after all?" 

Regardless of the Masters' aspirations, they'll probably never be media stars. They are an ugly lot – but a great rock & roll band. [Ted Drozdowski]....Rolling Stone:.....~


Masters Of Reality – Sunrise On The Sufferbus was released back in 1992, on Chrysalis Records. I already owned the 1988 debut album, (self titled), from Masters Of Reality when I jumped on this album back in 1992. The best way I can describe this band is Old School Stoner Rock/Hard Rock, in my Metal opinion. This is a grossly underrated Rock album, the musicianship, songs and total grooviness on Sunrise On The Sufferbus makes this a lifetime keeper, for me. My favorite song on this album is J.B. Witchdance, a non stop bass groove with a semi-haunting overall sound, always seems to put me in a cool mood. My second choice pick from Sunrise On The Sufferbus is She Got Me (When She Got Her Dress On) – this song as with the entire album, is unbelievably unique, I just never heard a band sound like Masters Of Reality back then, nor do I now. This album is the closest thing to heavy without being so… I know that sounds crazy, I just cannot explain this music any better than that. O.K., maybe I’ll try this… cool under heavy… now that might work. (If you are wincing at the use of words here, just go with Stoner Rock). 

My best buddy in the Metal Universe, Scott, well, he and I must have listened to this CD together at least… 250 times, maybe slightly more. I am not exaggerating here with the numbers… we both really locked into Sunrise On The Sufferbus. You see, Scott and I became very fascinated with the Sega Genesis game system back around 1991… so much that we were like anyone else who call themselves gamers, we played Sega Genesis games for very, very, long hours. Of course, during these marathon nights and/or days of Sega Genesis, we both would listen to Heavy Metal and Hard Rock aplenty. Sunrise On The Sufferbus was just always played, again and again… and again. Speaking for myself here, to this day, I do not know what the hypnotic appeal is to Sunrise On The Sufferbus… all I can say is it stands alone with it’s Rock vibe. Again, I guess that is why I call it Stoner Rock. 

Looking back on those days in 1992 and the few years after, I appreciate the fact my best buddy Scott hung out with me for those endless hours of NHLPA Hockey, John Madden Football and Tony LaRussa Baseball. I really mastered those Sega Genesis games back then… Scott was not too shabby either, however, he never could keep up with my patented swoop move to the goalie, on the NHLPA Hockey game. Hanging out and chillin’ with my best buddy Scott so many years ago, when there were no major bills to pay, no deadlines to meet, just marathon rounds of Sega Genesis game playing and listening to Sunrise On The Sufferbus are memories I will never forget. We really did have a good time talking Metal, and listening to Metal and Hard Rock… hours at a time. (We listened to so much music during these marathon games, heck, Garth Brooks was even put into the CD rotation too). The Sega Genesis game system with all of those cool games, I gave to my nephew some years back. However, Sunrise On The Sufferbus is still in my CD collection and it is a pretty difficult Masters Of Reality CD to track down. The last time I checked, Sunrise On The Sufferbus is out of print. I can’t see myself parting with Sunrise On The Sufferbus for at least another 100 years or so. 

Masters Of Reality, as they appeared on Sunrise On The Sufferbus: Chris Goss on lead vocals, guitars and keyboards, Googe on bass guitar and backing vocals and the legendary Ginger Baker on drums and backing vocals......~


As you know, the Masters of Reality are among the lost causes defended by Inside Rock. A group followed by 965 fans on Facebook (for comparison the Jonas Brothers have 5 million ...), it does not really the "buzz" on the web. Yet unlike many wooden rockers, the Masters of Reality represent a real musical project, played by Chris Goss, his leader, singer and guitarist. A project born in 1981, formulated for the first time on laser-disc in 1988 with a work that presents itself as a condensed modern "classic rock", paradoxical description of a man obsessed by the glorious ancestors but aware that we do not redo not the Beatles thirty years later. So Chris draws a lot, and never plagiarized yet. 

With kindness, the critics will discuss Cream about the first opus of the same name , a product based on powerful and heavy blues-rock. That does not fall on deaf ears, far from it, so much so that the drummer Ginger Baker decides to join Chris Goss for the next album, this Sunrise On The Sufferbus even better. Because if the beginnings of the Masters of Reality had matured for almost a decade and gave birth to songs long repeated, refined, planed until the substantive marrow, they do not arrive however at the level of impeccable control deployed in this second test. A blazing mastery, a true two-thousand-thousand-volt flash that brings life to the creature of Dr. Frankenstein / Chris Gossa patchwork of sparse influences sewn by the expert hands of the guitarist, aided by Googe's scalpel bass and Baker's defibrillator battery . 

The music of the power trio mixes in fact in its shaker all that the blues-rock and the pop produced of better in the years 60 and 70, but with what class and what originality! Led Zeppelin, Peter Green, Beatles, Hendrix, Bowie, Cream, are identifiable and unrecognizable all at once on the disc. A hallucinating, sumptuous record, improbable in its concept even in a grunge era and rapper, and which will however influence the entire stoner scene. It is as if the presence of Ginger Baker in the casks had transcended Goss to make him realize his most accessible work, the most accomplished, the most melodic. A dense music that blues its repetitive repetition and heavy its powerful amplitude, a refocused sound on the holy trinity rock, guitar / bass / drums, a mix of intelligent songs and exciting.She Got Me, which brings us into the dance through Baker's drum rolls, but also the groovy JB Witchdance who rolls up the mechanical and the amazing Gimme Water which meows the treble of a cat ready to scratch. 

Alongside this, the listener will be delighted with Paul McCartney-esque ballads, whether it's the delicious Jody Sings , ideal for Goss's high voice, will dream while listening to the bewitching 100 Years (Of Tears on the Wind) and Rabbit One , with the iterative verve typical of Masters Of Reality art, monotonous and changing all together. Because the melody is always sweet and slow at Chris Goss, supported by a flawless production that gives him the right timing and good accompaniment. To achieve such success, you also need to know how to compose, and what better demonstration than that offered by Ants In The Kitchen and TUSA(Big joke about how Americans are bored for making tea), two nuggets in the manner of , demanding Cream with the same genius who saw Glenn Gould replay Chopin. In the end, a puzzling album, staggering by its current reinterpretation of the eternal myths of a rock so reactionary when it comes to summoning its patriarchs. 

Needless to say, this is the best Masters Of Reality album. Needless to say, it represents the matrix of the entire Queens Of The Stone Age discography. Needless to say, this is the most underrated record of the last twenty years. Needless to say that a music lover named his blog Sunrise On The Sufferbus in his honor, and that such a thing does not happen to everyone (no, we do not quote a name). No need to put words on this wonderful pouch showing a bunny rabbit, meeting two song titles, Rabbit One and Bicycle . Needless to say, we hardly find the album anymore unless we download it. No need to assume that Hadopi does not care.....by Emmanuel Chirache ......~



Line Up

Ginger Baker Cymbals, Drums, Vocals (bckgr), Voices, Writer,
Googe Bass, Vocals (bckgr),
Chris Goss Guitar, Keyboards, Vocals
Ron Jeffries Piano
Simeon Pillich Cello
Daniel Rey Guitar, Producer



Tracklist 

She Got Me (When She Got Her Dress On) 2:47
J.B. Witchdance 3:37
Jody Sings 3:03
Rolling Green 3:42
Ants In The Kitchen 3:22
V.H.V. 4:22
Bicycle 0:48
100 Years (Of Tears In The Wind) 4:06
T.U.S.A. 3:00
Tilt-A-Whirl 3:43
Rabbit One 3:33
Madonna 0:38
Gimme Water 2:23
The Moon In Your Pocket 3:29 




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Rory Gallagher

Rory Gallagher

Arriving at Woodstock, 1969

Arriving at Woodstock, 1969

Jänis Joplin

Jänis Joplin

Mountain Woodstock 1969

Mountain Woodstock  1969

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underground music johnkatsmc5

underground music johnkatsmc5