Saturday, 18 June 2016

Fapardokly “Fapardokly” 1969 US Private Psych Folk






Fapardokly.“Fapardokly” 1969  UIP Label Mega Rare Legendary album,Merrell Funkhauser,Bill Dodd,Dick Lee,& John Oliver recorded this in the middle to late 60`s First Press This Was Obtained From Merrel Himself when in the late 80` he found a dusty box of 23 copies in his beach Hut in Hawaii..
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One of the most sought-after rock rarities of the '60s, this album was stylistically uneven, as can be expected from an LP cobbled together from recordings spanning a few years. About half, however, is sparkling psychedelic folk-rock, recalling Fifth Dimension Byrds with its shimmering twelve-string guitars, multipart harmonies, and occasional trippy lyrics. Although the early material is more pop-oriented and doesn't fit in as well, it's pretty solid, recalling the Zombies and (in the very earliest tracks) Ricky Nelson. "Lila," "Tomorrow's Girl," and "Super Market" are genuine lost '60s treasures, and much of the rest of the album isn't far behind.....~
Though they were considered an enigma in the world of '60s rock collectibles, there was never a group called Fapardokly; the 12 songs on their self-titled album were recorded by Merrell & the Exiles, a Southern California group headed by legendary cult folk-rocker Merrell Fankhauser. That group cut several singles for the tiny Glenn label before heading off in a psychedelic direction and mutating into H.M.S. Bounty. The equally tiny UIP label decided to gather a few of the Glenn singles, add a few more psychedelically oriented tracks that Merrill and his group had recorded, and release the package as the work of a group called Fapardokly. Although it was not recorded or intended as a unified work, it stands as one of the great lost folk-rock classics of the '60s. Fankhauser went on to make more excellent obscure recordings with H.M.S. Bounty in the late '60s and Mu in the early '70s....~

The Fapardokly story goes back to the end of 1963 when I quit the surf band The Impacts in Pismo Beach and moved to the high desert area of Lancaster, California. There I met a young guitar player named Jeff Cotton and together with Jim Furguson on bass and Greg Hampton on drums we formed Merrell and The Exiles. We were discoverd by Glenn Records in nearby Palmdale and started recording in the small Glenn studio. I recorded one of my first vocals I had written back in 1961, 'Too Many Heartbreaks' and a new song 'Please Be Mine.' It came out as our first single on the Glenn label and got airplay in the Antelope Valley and in L.A., reaching #9 on the local station KUTY April, 1964.
Glenn then released another single in 1965, 'Send Me Your Love' and 'Don't Call On Me;' in 1966, 'Sorry For Yourself' and 'I Saw Susie Cryin';' and in 1967 'Tomorrow's Girl' and 'When I Get Home.' This was our best selling single and got national airplay and was even played on Dick Clark's American Bandstand. The Exiles lineup of members had already changed by this time, and this would be the last recording released by Merrell and The Exiles.
From 1964 to 1967 The Exiles and various studio players recorded enough material for more than two albums and even did sessions in Los Angeles studios that all ended up on the shelves at Glenn Records in Palmdale. Around May of 1967 I moved back to the central California coast and formed Fapardokly and began playing at The Cove nightclub in Pismo Beach. About two months later Glenn Records called and said they would like to put out an album with some of the songs on the shelf and a few new ones. So we made the trip to Glenn's studio in Palmdale, recorded several songs and even went down to Gold Star studios in Hollywood and recorded a song and delivered it to Glenn and told him the band was now called "Fapardokly."
Glenn randomly selected songs from their archives and released the Fapardokly album on a subsidiary label UIP Records #2250 in late 1967. The confusing part is the songs were not in chronlogical order--mixing new and old together and not really saying who played on what track. It just had a list of musicians that contributed to the album.
There were actually only three songs on the Fapardokly album by the band Fapardokly; four songs by the studio group that were never released under any band name; and five songs by Merrell and The Exiles on the album. The remainder of the Merrell and The Exiles songs that were left on the shelves at Glenn Records eventually saw the light of day in the early nineties on two limited edition LPs and CDs. Nobody would have ever thought that the Fapardokly album would end up being one of the most valuable and highly sought after historical recordings of the 1960s!
Bill Dodd and I later went on to form HMS Bounty in 1968 and released an album titled Things on Uni Records. I later got back together with Jeff Cotton , Larry Willey and Randy Wimer and formed the band MU in 1969.
by Merrell Fankhauser, November 2009...~


Though they were considered an enigma in the world of '60s rock collectibles, there was never a group called Fapardokly; the 12 songs on their self-titled album were recorded by Merrell & the Exiles, a Southern California group headed by legendary cult folk-rocker Merrell Fankhauser. That group cut several singles for the tiny Glenn label before heading off in a psychedelic direction and mutating into H.M.S. Bounty. The equally tiny UIP label decided to gather a few of the Glenn singles, add a few more psychedelically oriented tracks that Merrill and his group had recorded, and release the package as the work of a group called Fapardokly. Although it was not recorded or intended as a unified work, it stands as one of the great lost folk-rock classics of the '60s. Fankhauser went on to make more excellent obscure recordings with H.M.S. Bounty in the late '60s and Mu in the early '70s......~

Merrell interview by psychedelic baby
Merrell Fankhauser's Official Web Site 

http://www.merrellfankhauser.com/
Merrell Fankhauser (born in Kentucky, but raised in the Los Angeles area) is one of rock's true originals. He debuted with the surf band Impacts, whose album Wipe Out (Del Fi, november 1962) was one of the first instrumental surf albums. Fankhauser wrote the title-track, which became a hit for the Surfaris. Then he moved on to form the Exiles, whose material would later be collected on Merrell and the Exiles (Ocean), a folk-rock combo with Captain Beefheart's cohorts Jeff Cotton and John French that recorded about 20 Fankhauser songs for Glenn Records, initially in the style of folk-rock (Lila, Supermarket) but later in a more "acid" vein. A few of the 1963-66 singles were collected on Fapardokly (Universal, 1966), which is an Exiles album despite the fact that the label forgot to print the band's name on the cover.
Fankhauser's next project was the HMS Bounty, which actually was simply most of the Impacts. Their Things (1968 - Cherry Red, 1985) contains mellow garage-rock and folk-rock songs (Drivin Sideways On A One Way Street).
Fankhauser briefly jammed with Captain Beefheart. In 1969 Beefheart's guitarist Jeff Cotton and Fankhauser formed Mu (basically a reunion of the Exiles). Their first album, Mu (RTV, 1971), reissued as The Maui Album (Reckless, 1988), contains the mystical/tribal suite Eternal Thirst, the exotic novelty Mumbella Baye La La, a spastic blues number a` la Beefheart (Ain't No Blues), the ethereal psychedelia of Blue Form and Brother Lew. Mu released three singles before disbanding: Ballad of Brother Lew/ Nobody Wants To Shine (Mantra, 1972), One More Day/You've Been Here Before (MU, 1972), On Our Way To Hana/Too Naked For Demetrius (MU, 1973). Cotton moved back to Los Angeles and became a priest.
The material recorded in 1973-74 for Mu's second album would eventually surface on The Last Album (Appaloosa, 1982), reissued as End Of An Era (Reckless, 1988). This material is less psychedelic and more exotic, laid-back, spiritual. The double-disc MU (Sundazed, 1997) contains a selection of both albums and the singles. Children of the Rainbow (Blue Form, 1985) collects some unreleased 1975 sessions. They all pale compared with Mu's first album.
Fankhauser had already (1973) moved to Maui (Hawaii) and recorded his first solo album, Merrell Fankhauser (1976), a collection of acoustic vignettes (Make A Joyful Noise). Calling From A Star (1983), A Day In Paradise (Source 2 1985) and Doctor Fankhauser (1986), recorded in 1982, returned to acid-rock, and were followed by one of his masterpieces, Message To The Universe (One Big Guitar, 1986), a metaphysical rock opera.
The autobiographical concept Psychedelic Dreams (1988), whose songs "tell the story of Merrell's musical career", Back This Way Again (1989), Flying To Machu Picchu (1991), Jungle Lo Lo Band (Legend, 1994) kept the legend alive.
Fankhauser and drummer Ed Cassidy of Spirit also recorded the bluesy On The Blue Road (D-Town, 1995).
Eventually, Fankhauser resurrected the Impacts to make albums of instrumental surf such as Eternal Surf (Ocean, 1997) and Sex Wax And Surf (Ocean, 1999), thus returning to his origins.
Fankhauser worked seven years on the epic 73-minute Return To Mu (Captain Trip, 2000), that includes remakes of Waterfall and On Our way To Hana, and its follow-up Man From Mu. (It is not true that the albums contain old material that were lost in the jungle of Maui, etc etc: the story was made up by the USA distributor).
Rockin And Surfin (Ocean, 2004) is a solo instrumental surf album....by....Piero Scaruffi ...~






Reviews:
Much loved folk-rock record that is highly desirable from a 60s record collector perspective but comes with a steep price tag ($300-500). I believe Fapardokly’s only lp was released in 1967 off UIP but has some of Merrell Fankhauser’s early work with the Exiles. Prior to the Exiles, Fankhauser had been in the Impacts, a surf group who released the sought after 62/63 lp Wipe Out! This lp contains the original version of Wipe Out and the album as a whole is recognized as a minor gem of surf music.
After the Impacts, Fankhauser would retreat to the desert area of Antelope Valley (CA). It was here where he began to grow as a songwriter and musician. Fankhauser would soon discover a 14 year old Jeff Cotton and eventually the two would form the Exiles. The Exiles played a kind of beat music influenced by the British Invasion and earlier artists such as Ricky Nelson and Buddy Holly. Three or four of these tracks appear on the Fapardokly album and were recorded in Glen Studios during the 1964-65 era. The best of these early tracks is Tomorrow’s Girl, a nice, downbeat Zombies inspired tune that had real potential. In all the Exiles would release 3 singles in the mid 60s of which none would result in any kind of commercial success.
There would be numerous lineup changes throughout 65-66, a time period in which Captain Beefheart would convince both John French and Jeff Cotton to join his new Magic Band. Even through all this, Fankhauser was able to record some interesting folk-rock tracks and eventually release the Fapadokly album in 1967. These newer tracks were more sophisticated and recorded at both Gold Star and Gary Paxton Studios in Hollywood CA. The album opened up with Lila, an excellent, shimmering folk-rocker that recalled the best aspects of the Byrds’ Fifth Dimension lp. The next track, the Music Scene, had a clear Bob Dylan influence and lyrically explained Fankhauser’s frustrations with the music industry. Super Market closed the album out on a high note with its beautiful 12 string acoustic guitar runs, psychedelic lyrics, and blaring trumpet. Two other tracks, Gone To Pot and the quirky Mr. Clock were both successful forays into 1966 psychedelia. The former track begs strong comparisons to the Byrds’ Eight Miles High but is still a very enjoyable piece of raga-rock. The whole album is a mini gem of mid 60s folk-rock which can easily be bought on cd for less than $10 (try the Sundazed version).
Though they were considered an enigma in the world of ‘60s rock collectibles, there was never a group called Fapardokly; the 12 songs on their self-titled album were recorded by Merrell & the Exiles, a Southern California group headed by legendary cult folk-rocker Merrell Fankhauser. That group cut several singles for the tiny Glenn label before heading off in a psychedelic direction and mutating into H.M.S. Bounty. The equally tiny UIP label decided to gather a few of the Glenn singles, add a few more psychedelically oriented tracks that Merrill and his group had recorded, and release the package as the work of a group called Fapardokly. Although it was not recorded or intended as a unified work, it stands as one of the great lost folk-rock classics of the ‘60s. Fankhauser went on to make more excellent obscure recordings with H.M.S. Bounty in the late '60s and Mu in the early '70s.
One of the most sought-after rock rarities of the '60s, this album was stylistically uneven, as can be expected from an LP cobbled together from recordings spanning a few years. About half, however, is sparkling psychedelic folk-rock, recalling Fifth Dimension Byrds with its shimmering twelve-string guitars, multipart harmonies, and occasional trippy lyrics. Although the early material is more pop-oriented and doesn’t fit in as well, it’s pretty solid, recalling the Zombies and (in the very earliest tracks) Ricky Nelson. “Lila,” “Tomorrow’s Girl,” and “Super Market” are genuine lost '60s treasures, and much of the rest of the album isn’t far behind.
Fapardokly were Merrell Fankhauser guitar, Bill Dodd lead guitar, John Oliver bass, and Dick Lee drums. The odd name being a combination of their surnames - or rather three of them plus that of Don Parrish, the original bass player....Rising Storm review......~

This only album by Fapardokly is a quite decent collection of psychedelic pop tracks. The songs are all very short and none of them really stands out as a true highlight. On the other hand none of these songs is bad either. I think this album is pretty balanced because even if these songs are so very short there are no clear fillers included.
I would never call this as a great album but it's pretty entertaining overall. Classic 60's psych pop with lots of sunshine pop sound as well. Three stars is exactly what I feel about this lone Fapardokly album. Definitely not a masterpiece but definitely not a bad record either.....by..CooperBolan ....~

An interesting release from one of the many colourful characters that were born out of the Southern Californian Psychedelic movement, Merrell Fankhauser and one of his many line ups and guises put out a cool bunch of Sunshine Pop sounding Psychedelia.
‘Fapardokly’ released just one record together under this line up before breaking apart to join and form other celebrated West Coast psych acts like 'Mu’ and Captain Beefheart’. It was marked before its release as 'a groundbreaking record that was destined to be the next landmark in the music business' and many years down the track is renowned as being one of the most collectible and valuable US records.
The album consists of some fairly soft and quirky pop songs with what we now consider to be 'psychedelic’ production and sound scapes. Spacey reverbs drench the vocals and there are some really nice fuzz guitars and 'golden tone' surf rock sounding riffs which draw from Fankhausers younger years as a Surf Rock instrumentalist. But despite it sounding very much like a psych record the actual songs are kind of simple and almost like 50’s and early 60’s 'Doo wop’ tunes which lighten the vibe a little too much for me to consider this to be an influential psych release regardless of wether or not you like this kind of music.
An interesting note, Fapardokly was a name Merrell Fankhauser created out of the first three letters of all the band members. Saves you looking up the meaning of this obscure word.
Overall, its an enjoyable listen and it reminds me of things like The Everley Brothers, or the more poppy side of The Byrds. Its not an impressive bunch of songs but take away the hype and the sense of historical reference and we have here a simple and steady Sunshine Pop record that sits in the mid sixties pile quite nicely.....by...siren05 ......~


For all the hype surrounding this very rare record, you'd really think it would be something special - it ain't! Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying it's awful, or even weak. It's just nothing that I would consider even very good, just a good, solid record of mostly relatively uninspired pop tunes. As is fairly well known by now, not all of the tracks from the original album were by the band that has come to be known as Fapardokly. Two of them were actually recorded by M.F.'s earlier outfit, The Exiles. It is the Fap. cuts that contain the most (if any) psychedelic content. the three bonus cuts included here, all recorded during the Fap. sessions, are among the best on this CD, so are therefor, indispensable for completists. The fold-out cover card contains the bare minimum of background info, so don't expect much there. Like the orig. LP, this is also in mono. Though many will probably like this more than I do, I can't recommend for or against this, just be prepared for possible disappointment. FYI: recorded late '66....by..tymeshifter ....~ 

There are grounds for arguing that Fapardokly's sole LP isn't so much a lost folk-rock nugget as an incoherent mess. It's a jumble of unrelated 1964-67 sessions in both Hollywood and the small Southern Californian desert town of Palmdale, much of which had previously been released on singles billed to a group using an entirely different name; some of it sounds much closer to Ricky Nelson's rockabilly than the Byrds' heavenly chime; and it must be one of the few prized '60s rarities where the original cover is actually uglier than the one substituted for it on its 1980s bootleg reissue. About half of the record is actually taken from 1964-67 singles issued by Merrell & the Exiles on the small Glenn label, "Merrell" being leader Merrell Fankhauser, who changed his confusing musical chairs of a band's name to Fapardokly before the final tracks were cut. The album sneaked out virtually unnoticed in 1967 (though one discography gives a release date of February 1968), with only about one thousand copies pressed -- about half of them, according to Fankhauser, given away.
But...you can't keep a good album down, no matter how disorganized it is. Original copies of the LP were already fetching high-three-figure sums by the early 1980s, by which time a widely distributed bootleg had also appeared. And while it isn't all folk-rock -- in fact, upon first hearing, it almost sounds like a deliberately Zappa-ish pastiche of '60s pop from teen idoldom to psychedelia -- what folk-rock it does have rates among the finest sub-Byrdsian stuff ever done in the genre. "Lila" in particular is a shimmering 12-stringer, and while "Gone to Pot" is a pretty blatant cop of "Eight Miles High," it's got a reckless spaced-out flavor all its own, particularly after segueing into the reverb-laden gloomfest of "No Retreat." "I think what happened is Bill Dodd [who plays 12-string Rickenbacker on 'Gone to Pot'] had heard the guitar riff and he used to go to sleep with the radio on," Fankhauser explained to me in 1985. "I said, 'Bill, that's bad practice, you're gonna subconsciously get something in there.'"
Other highlights were the goofy "Mr. Clock," which transplanted the Beatles' "Michelle" riff into an actual ode to a cuckoo clock; "Glass Chandlier" [sic], another tripped-out scrutinization to an inanimate piece of furniture, yet pitched perfectly between harmonized folk-rock and astral psychedelia; "The Music Scene," an atypically sour swipe against the no-talents cluttering Sunset Strip; and "Super Market," which soars with the best of sunshine pop, though with tons more drive than that genre was wont to employ. True, other tracks like the Zombies-worthy "Tomorrow's Girl" and the infectious "When I Get Home" were closer to the British Invasion than folk-rock, and "Too Many Heartbreaks" and "Suzie Cryin'" more in tune with the even more dated strains of Ricky Nelson and Roy Orbison respectively. Yet they were still highly enjoyable tracks in their own right that detracted not a whit from the cheerily random, if illogical, whichever-way-the-wind blows flow of the disc as a whole.
Future Captain Beefhearters John French and Jeff Cotton can be heard on some of Fapardokly, and Fankhauser would likewise turn in more psychedelic and slightly weirder directions at the helm of H.M.S. Bounty at the end of the 1960s and MU (with Cotton back in the ranks) in the early '70s. Both of those bands issued fine albums as well, Merrell retaining his knack for combining slightly off-kilter songs and arrangements with highly accessible melodies, all anchored by his pleasing light, high vocals. Fapardokly -- now easily available on CD, with three previously unreleased bonus tracks from the same era -- might not be as unified in its vision as those H.M.S. Bounty and MU albums were. But its music is just as worthy and enduring, even it is as wackily fragmented as any record of its era, folk-rock or otherwise.....By Richie Unterberger......~


The above album was issued in Feb. 1968, but consists of recordings made between 1964-67, during which time the band played in Lancaster, California. It includes material released on 45s with Fankhauser's previous band, The Exiles, which by the time of the album's release was patchy and rather dated. The remainder of the album consists of folk-rock and soft psychedelia. Examples of the latter are the mysterious Gone To Pot and No Retreat. The Fapardokly album remains extremely sought-after.
The recent Sundazed CD includes three previously unreleased tracks The War, Yes I Love You and Run Baby Run.
Compilation appearances include: Supermarket on Sundazed Sampler, Vol. 2 (CD); Gone To Pot and No Retreat on Echoes In Time, Vol. 1 (LP & CD); and Gone To Pot on We Have Come For Your Children.
(Vernon Joynson/Clark Faville)........
Back on CD after being out of print for many, many years, it's the the ultra-rare 1968 psychedelic masterpiece recorded by Merrell Fankhauser and his Southern California group The Exiles. Back in the day the group cut several singles for the tiny Glenn label before mutating into H.M.S. Bounty. The equally tiny UIP label decided to gather a few of the Glenn singles, add a few more psychedelically oriented tracks, and release the package as the work of a non-exisiting group called Fapardokly. Although the recordings were never intended as a unified work, the LP stands as one of the great lost classics of the '60s. Fankhauser went on to make more excellent recordings with H.M.S. Bounty in the late '60s and Mu in the early '70s.....~









Fapardokly 
*Merrell Fankhauser - Vocals, Guitar 
*Bill Dodd - Vocals And Guitar 
*John Oliver - Vocals And Bass 
*Dick Lee - Drums 

With 
*Mark Thompson - Organ 
*Jody Cobb - Bass 
*John Parr - Drums 
*Don Aldridge - Vocals 
*Gary Lotspeich - Vocals 
*Larry Willey - Vocals And Guitar 
*Jim Furguson - Bass 
*Greg Hampton - Drums 
*John Day -Organ 
*Randy Wimer - Drums 
*Bruce Ulch - Trumpet 


Tracks 
1. Lila (M. Fankhauser, D. Aldridge) - 3:23 
2. The Music Scene - 2:35 
3. Sorry For Yourself - 2:01 
4. Glass Chandlier (M. Fankhauser, D. Aldridge) - 2:11 
5. Tomorrow's Girl - 2:28 
6. Suzie Cryin' - 2:23 
7. Mr. Clock (M. Fankhauser, D. Aldridge) - 2:26 
8. Gone To Pot (M. Fankhauser, D. Aldridge) - 2:02 
9. No Retreat - 1:56 
10.Too Many Heartbreaks - 2:28 
11.When I Get Home - 2:47 
12.Super Market (M. Fankhauser, D. Aldridge) - 2:12 
13.The War - 2:33 
14.Yes I Love You - 2:40 
15.Run Baby Run - 2:20 






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Mu “Mu” 1971 US Psychedelic Folk Rock


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