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11 Jun 2016

Flaviola E O Bando Do Sol ”Flaviola E O Bando Do Sol” 1976 Brazil Psych Folk







Flaviola E O Bando Do Sol ”Flaviola E O Bando Do Sol” 1976 Brazil Psych Folk.

full album

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYVjZPNlfsM

Interest in Brazil’s 1960s/1970s music scene is pretty much dominated by Tropicalia these days, but behind this popular front lay a bevy of fantastic psychedelic rock albums that don’t otherwise fit in with the kaleidoscopic coastal sounds of folks like Caetano Veloso, Gal Costa or Os Mutantes. One of these is the self-titled release by Flaviola e o Bando do Sol, an ethereal slice of psychedelic folk music put together by many of the same cats who made Lula Côrtes and Zé Ramalho’s Paêbirú such an enduring classic.
There is a lazy, mellow vibe to the proceedings here that really puts you in a midnight, beach campfire vibe, with jangling acoustic guitars and wispy flashes of percussion bedding Flaviola’s warm, reassuring vocals. Flute, dulcimer, and what sounds like a harp also make appearances here, as well as several other instruments that sound distinctly Brazilian, though I’ll be damned if I can name them. The rare, rapid-fire semi-electric number “Asas” and the catchy “Balalaica” are definitely the numbers to play to Tropicalia fans, featuring the record’s most energetic rhythms, with Flaviola and friends cheerily chanting out the title on the latter (whether or not the song actually makes use of a Russian balalaika I have no idea). Slower pieces like “Noite” and the autoharp punctuated “Canção de Outono” are more personal numbers, with sleepy sways to them and delicate finger picking.
The record is pretty short, at just under half an hour long, so I’ll keep the review short in turn. After all, this isn’t exactly an album that you can say very much about, as it’s more about the magic of hearing all these simple acoustic sounds come together – there is nothing shocking or avant-garde here, simply beautiful music that is bound to stick with you long after the needle’s been lifted. British-based reissue label Mister Bongo has done us all a favor by repressing this one on 180 gram vinyl, though if that’s not your thing (and it should be) then they also have copies on compact disc. Don’t miss this one…
What would happen if Robin Williamson, Mike Heron or Vashti Bunyan had been born in Recife, Brazil? … How they would sound? Probably, we will never know, but for me the closest answer lies in 1974’s album “Flaviola e o Bando do Sol” (Flaviola and the Flock of the Sun).

Williamson, Heron or Bunyan weren’t in Brazil at that time, but Flávio Lira, Lula Côrtes, Pablo Raphael, Robertinho of Recife, and Zé Ramalho certainly were, and they could have been perfectly the “Incredible String Band Brazilian counterparts”, their self tiled lp sounds astonishingly fresh, full of native acoustic Brazilian instruments, gloomy at times [canto funebre], hysterical [asas (pra que te quero)] or extremely poetical [noite].

If you like the folkier side of other Brazilian kids Called Os Mutantes (I know that you like them) you certainly will love Flaviola, as Forced Exposure points: “this is a brilliant album, full of strange moments (cellophane crinkled into the microphone as percussion), some deft acoustic guitar, and some of the prettiest songs this side of Vashti Bunyan”

This mystical album alongside Zé Ramalho & Lula Côrtes “Paêbirú” (recorded the same year and almost with the same lineup as Flaviola…) and Satwa’s “Satwa” constitute the three jewels of Recife’s acid folk crown.

What are you waiting?, put your headphones, turn on the music, and smell the perfumed night of Recife. This could be the cheapest and exciting Holidays ever!
Keep Listening…!!! ….

johnkatsmc5, welcome music..