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11 Jun 2016

Magical Power Mako “Super Record” 1975 Japan Psych Rock Experimental.


Magical Power Mako ‎ "Super Record" Japan Psych Space Rock,Experimental
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Over the past couple of years I have completely fallen for the Japanese music scene. Starting out with the big names such as Flower Travellin' Band and Far East Family Band (much due to the connection with my much beloved Klaus Schulze), it then progressed into something more fickle and investigative. I had now begun my big Sherlock Holmes hunt for things far beyond the norm - things that make elderly ladies go WIIH and OHH - and have ever since collected albums from acts with names that sound like liquor for kids - or some strange new metallic fruit. 

Magical Power Mako are, or perhaps more befitting, is one of the early artists that I stumbled upon, back when I was mostly into psychedelic music. This album presented itself to me as the second coming of something I knew like the back of my hand. In fact it still does. To me it genuinely sounds like a Japanese take on the old sandwich album/movie soundtrack from Floyd: More. 

Sure you encounter some of those same orangy colours in the art work, but hiding underneath is an expressive, intimate and charming little bugger of an album, that on more than one occasion points a finger in the general direction of the Floyd boys circa 1969. There is a prevailing eclectic shadow hanging over these tunes, that apart from generating a haphazard feel to things, actually works like a strange mythical binding agent. Together but apart... Just like More, you get treated to all kinds of differentiating tempers, that vary on the individual tracks and how they flow, weave and stack up against each other. I'll be bold and say that Super Record feels connected and well-orchestrated, even if the proof in the pudding suggests otherwise... 

The opening cuts cement the Japanese adoration for the occult psychedelic - the larvalling oozing presence of lethargic slow moving guitars, that push through your speakers like a pair of somersaulting black birds immersing from a wall of black currant marmalade. Had this music been put out in Germany from around the same time, it surely would have received recognition as being part of the Krautrock scene(remember, Krautrock was largely a label we modern folks have conjured up in order to alphabetise our music collections to better ask for directions in the lands of sonic experimentation). 

Jumping almost casually from the big soupy psychedelic start, the listener is guided into a dream-like state of far East ragadelicious vibes with sitars and folk laden atmospheres with heaps of acoustic instruments, to the more western influenced parts of this album, where you get your rocks off while still feeling that oriental tinged feel of it all hovering above you like a see-through veil of sound. 

Much like More, Super Record also has its fair share of interludes/epilogues, whatever you want to call them, and they are of a surprisingly high quality. They are extremely necessary to these ears. The Sound 3 track for instance coming on every once in a while, actually 5 times in all, acts as short moments of unadulterated simplistic beauty wherever you encounter it. It's merely a wobbly electric wah wahing guitar talking slowly and echoing to you, but it is just so infectious and riveting. Come to think of it, most of this record uses that same sort of musical laissez faire template. Apart from the obvious well- written ditties, you sense a wonderful open approach to music making that soaks everything in small glistening ornamentations. Whether it's done with a psychedelic electric guitar, sitar, sparse squeaking synthesizer or a relentless tapping flow of natural sounding clay drums, there's always a tremendous emphasis on the simplistic and natural within this album. 

Now when I say 'natural', and have mentioned time and again the electric guitar - as well as a synthesiser, you can probably guess, that I mean something of the sort that pushes through in other areas than the factual ingredients of the album. I am of course speaking about the general vibe - the flow of things - how you feel transported out in the breathtaking natural wilderness of the far East - mountains, cherry blossoms, misty morning fogs flying overhead and all that you can possibly imagine transcribing in the natural environment around above and beneath you.... Just add a gazillion sonic fuelled rainbow colours swirling peacefully about in a constantly moving mosaic...... by Guldbamsen 


The music of Magical Power Mako never crossed my radar until I stumbled across his 1995 album "Lo Pop Diamonds" in my local library (in suburban Buffalo, of all places) and later discovered he was a featured artist in these Archives. That first encounter proved a less than ideal entry into the alternate universe of MPM, elsewhere known as Makoto Kurita when he isn't hiding in his bedroom studio, conjuring his Magical Power. 
Thankfully this 1975 effort is something else entirely. And by "something else" I mean an almost uncanny funhouse-mirror reflection of his Western role models: something not uncommon in post- war Japan but elevated here to its creative zenith, where simple translation becomes original mutation. A blind headphone test would leave me convinced I was hearing a long-lost, early '70s Krautrock LP, instead of a home recording by a reclusive Japanese teenager with a tacky fringe haircut and a near-visionary understanding of his own interior cosmos. 

The album was recorded over a period of several years, and the music is (literally) all over the map, from backwoods Azerbaijan to rural Switzerland to beyond the Andromeda Galaxy...everywhere, apparently, except his native Japan. But Mako's controls were set mainly for the heart of counterculture Germany. The album opener "Andromeda" reveals a kinship with Manuel Göttsching and ASH RA TEMPEL; the musical caravan of "Silk Road" carries echoes of Michael Karoli and CAN (in its strummed baglama and laser-beam electric guitars); and in "Pink Butch (LaLaLa)" the subtitle conveniently spells out the song's entire lyrical content, breathlessly sung in the style of a narcoleptic Klaus Dinger. 

The latter half of the album alternates even more eclectic detours - medieval Normandy in "Majorica Resistance Song"; a child's nursery in "Rock Baby in Meadow" - with pieces of a split interlude titled "Sound 3", divided into five parts but totaling under four-minutes in combined length. Separating the tracks this way only increases the album's overall sense of stylistic dislocation, appropriate for an artist described by psychedelic fanboy and "Japrocksampler" author Julian Cope as a "musical hermit". 

After first hearing the skewed tinker-toy electropop of "Lo Pop Diamonds" (worth at least one spin, for the unexpected novelty) I was relieved, and more than a little thrilled, to be reminded that there are still magicians among us, weaving their powerful spells..... by Neu!mann ..



Japanese experimental-rock trio re-releases their groundbreaking album after thirty years. Its creativity still holds up strongly, though a little more songwriting focus wouldn't have hurt. 
Magical Power Mako? With that kind of band name, what's the first thing that springs to your mind? 

If you're like me –- or any slightly geeky American music fan –- you assume that it must be a slightly geeky indie rock band, probably somewhat inspired by Final Fantasy. And that's exactly what I was expecting when I ordered it for review. So imagine my (unpleasant) surprise when I discovered I had, in fact, received a completely Japanese psychedelic folk-rock album. 

So that's my full disclaimer. It's also my roundabout way of informing you, dear reader, that I don't know shit when it comes to background for this album. From what little I can gather from my own research, Magical Power Mako is a trio with a reputation as something like the Yo-Yo Ma of experimental Japanese rock, and this album is a legendary touchstone of the scene, released during the '70s. Given that I have no prior knowledge or appreciation of Japanese psychedelia -– and there's no possible way to fake it –- I'm simply going to write this review purely from the perspective of an unknowing pop music critic. 

Fortunately, that doesn't immediately doom Super Record. Even with its experimental, completely unconventional nature, the album still boils down to something inherently listenable and enjoyable. The sound starts from a template of basic Japanese folk, and then proceeds to wildly pilfer from every Asian influence one can imagine -- there are Indian sitars, Turkish mandolins, and a distinctly Silk Road-ish sound (showcased most prominently on the song "Silk Road"). Add danceable rock rhythms, layer on a heavy dose of swirling psychedelic effects, and Super Record produces a lush, dense, relentlessly creative sound. 

Like all good experimental rock albums, each track is designed to be appreciated at an intellectual level, evoking its own particular mental landscape. The range of sound is breathtaking: the group begins with the hard bass trance of "Andromeda", but easily swings to a bleak, Kid A-esque "Tundra", pastoral rhythms on "Woman in South Island", and a martial beat on "Majorica Resistance Song". What's even better is the off-kilter creativity of the whole thing: its Asian motifs present an especially refreshing break from the same chord progressions that Western rock has milked to death. 

But while the sounds explored never fail to be cerebrally fascinating, they're not always as effective as actual, standalone songs. The consequence of such creative exploration is a tendency to meander: guitar lines play themselves off into nowhere, the melody occasionally breaks down, and one ridiculously annoying psychedelic sequence ("Song 3") is repeated far too many times. Songs like "Andromeda" and "Majorica Resistance Song" could have been blissful slices of experimental pop, if properly condensed; unfortunately, their unwillingness to end begins to test a listener's tolerance. 

When the songs do find proper focus, though, the results are richly rewarding. "Silk Road" and "Woman in South Island" have the power to transport you to their respective places, and "Sound, Mother Earth" sweeps with grandeur on a guttural, gurgling guitar. But what really leaves the greatest impact is "Pink Butch"; its hypnotic refrain is psychedelia at its best, entrancing, warm, and unsettling all at once. 

So -- legendary? I can see how such an album might have blazed a path in the early days of Japanese rock. Even thirty years later, it stands as a strong example of experimental rock; with a little more focus and condensation, it could have been a classic example of intellectually rewarding pop music as well......Winston Kung......................pop matters


This 1973 album, the debut effort from multi-instrumentalist Magical Power Mako, offers a similar rejection of conventional rock to what Krautrock bands were undergoing, though filtered through a Japanese rather than European sensibility. The album veers wildly and creatively in styles as one track flows into the next, from gentle folk on the first half of "Flying" to psychedelic rave-ups like "Restraint, Freedom" and the end of "Look up the Sky," to even more experimental extremes with the disturbing tape collage of "American Village 1973," though throughout there floats a cosmic vibe. Some tracks, like "Tsugaru" and "Shukuyakushi Nenbutsu Kanehari," weave traditional Japanese folk music into Mako's skewed vision. The sweet chorus of children singing to a relaxing piano on "Open the Morning Window" is almost too cute; fortunately, there's plenty of demented moments, like the pounding and screaming on "In a Stalactite Cavern Astonaus" and the hilarious and upbeat "Cha Cha," to make up for it. The eccentric Magical Power Mako would go on to make many more records, but this opening salvo of his psychedelia shows him already at the top of his game......by......by Rolf Semprebon.....allmusic.


This self-styled visionary and musical hermit has been releasing albums since the mid-70s. But the variety and here-there-and-everywhere approach of his attitude to record releases makes it difficult to grasp just who Magical Power Mako is, and what he does best. Mako’s career began auspiciously enough with thunderous applause for his first three LPs, but the slow nature of his recording techniques soon contributed to record company impatience with this often brilliant artist. Viewed by many as a legend and by others as a chancer, there’s no doubt that the extraordinarily varied quality of Magical Power Mako’s during the ‘90s contributed dramatically to compromising the public’s long-term perception of this charming artist. 
Born Makoto Kurita around 1955, Mako grew up in the seaside resort of Izu Shuzenji, a sea coastal town similar to Brighton or Torquay. Throughout his childhood, he was an outsider who wrote much music and played piano and guitar while still in primary school. At junior high school, he decided to make a more concerted effort to realise his musical vision, and would return home after school to write songs every day. His house was situated in the mountains and looked down at the town’s hot springs. Mako became fascinated then obsessed by an octagonal hotel built near the hot springs. Visible from his bedroom, Mako believed that someone was observing him from the hotel’s 3rd floor. This sense of being observed spurred him further into musical activities and, at age fourteen, he began to record with a reel-to-reel, ping ponging the tracks back and forth in order to build up sound. The summer holidays of 1970 were spent in long recording sessions making his own LP. When it was finished, Mako wrote on the reel-to-reel tape box: ‘Summer 1970, things a 14-year-old boy thinks about’. The tape commenced with a song (‘I Bought An Extraordinarily Big Eye In The Town One Day For A Good Bargain Price’). 

“One day, I bought an extremely big eye in the town, very cheaply, 
When I saw the world through the eye, 
Extremely small people were making noise, 
Making a fuss about winning or losing, 
What pathetic people who only have small eyes, 
And they think the universe is the end of this world, 
Not knowing that there is another world, 
One Day I bought an extraordinarily big eye for a cheap bargain price.” 

The tape contained the song ‘Open The Morning Window’ from the first LP. In this track, the lyric is about a human with a switch device for changing ways of thinking. He recorded enough songs for two LPs whilst still at junior high school. Then, Mako decided school was a dead end, and moved to Tokyo in the spring of 1971. While working in a steel factory and/or at the local pub, he formed a band named Genge with his brother. From September ’71, the band played at a mini-theatre Jan Jan, in Tokyo’s Shibuya district. His name began to count for something by April 1972, when he played his first major appearance at JIYU KUKAN(‘Freedom Space’). This so-called ‘modern music’ event took place at Nigata, in the north of Honshu. This event saw the flowering of a friendship with Keiji Heino (Two songs on the first LP (‘Restraint, Freedom’ and his high school song ‘Look Up The Sky’) featured his friend Keiji Haino.). From May 1972, Mako began to broadcast music for documentaries and radio dramas for NHK. In February 1973, Mako and Keiji Haino played live on a daytime chat TV programme entitled HIRU NO PUREZENTO (‘Lunchtime present’), and many viewers complained. In March 1973, Mako appeared on the NHK TV programme ONGAKU TO WATASHI (‘Music & I’), where he met composer Toru Takemitsu (b. 1930), then already in his mid-forties. Mako later took part in the recording of the music for Takemitsu’s THE FOREST OF FOSSILS. Mako’s relationship with Takemitsu blossomed, and in 1974, Mako took part in the music production for Takemitsu’s HIMIKO, a musical piece named after the first queen of Japan. His friendship with Takemitsu also saw him invited to participate in NHK-TV’s HERITAGE FOR THE FUTURE. It seems that Takemitsu’s recommendation to Polydor secured Mako’s first LP release. From the summer of 1973, he took up residence in a house belonging to the US Army, located in Fussa, Greater Tokyo. Mako began to record in this house, multi-tracking instrumental tracks endlessly. So many tapes were recorded that would not see the light of day for over twenty years, allowing new listeners to discover his old music. Even before the first LP, Mako recorded with Keiji Haino at the Fussa house. ...Julian Cope.....


Super Record, the second of Magical Power Mako's 20-plus recordings, originally released in 1975, is considered by those that know to be his finest, combining as it does strong elements of Japanese folk music alongside innovative psychedelic sounds and broad musical vistas of extraordinary imagination. Mako was born in Shuzeni Izu in Japan in 1956, and he began his musical education at a young age, making his first public performance in 1973 at the age of 16 with his band Genge in the famous Shibuya Club. Based on these impressive public performances, the precocious Mako was invited to play with one of Japan's foremost contemporary composers, Toru Takemitsu, playing alongside the composer on three film scores, Inheritance For The Future, Petrified Forest and Himiko. The response to his performances was overwhelmingly enthusiastic, elevating Mako to almost god-like status in his native country. Mako's music has often baffled pundits keen to place him in a particular musical slot. As one perplexed scribe opined "Mako's music possesses a certain strange kind of texture. It is certainly what they call rock, but contains elements we can't describe so succinctly. It clearly goes beyond the various genres of music and while full of them all, it sends forth a fierce glow." Another critic wrote: "Adding to the variety of folk music from India, Turkey and Russia, his mandolin or Taisho koto, and especially his marvellously-performed guitar, expresses fully the odor of the soil and mankind's universality." This numbered, limited edition has been digitally-remastered and housed in an LP replica sleeve......


Magical Power Mako - Super Record LP - Original PressnPolydor / MR5055 (released in 1975)n*with foldout insertnCover has a small seam split in top right corner and little bit worn. Vinyl is in great condition with no visible scratches. Plays and sounds great!nnHere's a description of the album:nMako is truly one of the most masterful musical minds behind some of nthe best psychedelic sounds that came out of Japan in the '70s, a relatively unsung hero of that scene. While his project Magical Power Mako certainly produced other records that are noisier, weirder, more abstract and fucked up, there is no doubt that the 1975 album Super Record is his absolute tour de force! An album that left many of us stunned upon our first encounter with it. It's one of those records that exemplifies what you really want in a psychedelic record, filled with a wide range of textures and mystical sounds from across the globe that take you on a journey and make you forget where you are.nSuper Record melts into an unforgettable washed out pastoral setting as it glides and floats through different terrain of dripping colors and hallucinatory smoke. Like the best psychedelic albums of this era, Super Record is an absolute start to finish experience, with different interludes laced with lute, harmonica, melodica, charged fuzzed out guitar all in a ceremonial tone which creates a mood and vibe that would be at home in a film by Jodorowsky or Antonioni.nThink of some mind melting combination of Ash Ra Temple, Bo Hansson, early '70s Pink Floyd, Jean-Claude Vannier, and a dash of The Incredible String Band and you start to get a picture of the kind of musical magic that is happening on Super Record. We also get the feeling that some of our favorite modern day psych music makers like The Alps, Blues Control, and Dungen have all been influenced by the brilliance of this album as well. Super and magical!...


On this second shot by Magical Power Mako (not with his bandmates but with his family), his experimental trial as the previous work is suppressed but gets to be more sensitive and theoretical for music. That is, in my humble opinion, Mako might accept that everything eccentric is not alright but consistency of music should be needed. With featuring many kinds of instruments, he might consider the important thing is musical integration. Well, please listen to the first half named as ‘Butch Side’. The stream-like starting of the first track Andromeda is the proof as above mentioned. Oh, I see, the integration could be constructed because he was the one and only player in this work. Tundra, with quiet and cold psychedelia, next Oriental chandelier Silk Road, and wonderfully hot and juicy Woman in South Island…all are made so compact, not scattered. Could they be easy for us to listen? Leaving Butch’s voice behind (sorry), Pink Butch (Lalala) is a beautiful piece of cake. Very sweet, very melancholic, and very feminine. Maybe because Mako liked to show his feminine appearance on media…? :-) Long and a little boring refrain is, I suggest, as flowing to the 5th 'Music From Heaven’. The latter half, named as Rock side, is like a sandwich with Sound 3 and each track. Especially I should push Rock Baby In Meadow as Mako showing consideration for his baby Rock. Yes, therefore this is a familial album. Of course, with full of exotic flavour and Mako’s humming (!) Majorica Resistance Song goes floating, and Cosmos Sandglass is his laidback heart… Feel that Mako play with relaxed style. …








Over the past couple of years I have completely fallen for the Japanese music scene. Starting out with the big names such as Flower Travellin’ Band and Far East Family Band (much due to the connection with my much beloved Klaus Schulze), it then progressed into something more fickle and investigative. I had now begun my big Sherlock Holmes hunt for things far beyond the norm - things that make elderly ladies go WIIH and OHH - and have ever since collected albums from acts with names that sound like liquor for kids - or some strange new metallic fruit. 
Magical Power Mako are, or perhaps more befitting, is one of the early artists that I stumbled upon, back when I was mostly into psychedelic music. This album presented itself to me as the second coming of something I knew like the back of my hand. In fact it still does. To me it genuinely sounds like a Japanese take on the old sandwich album/movie soundtrack from Floyd: More. 
Sure you encounter some of those same orangy colours in the art work, but hiding underneath is an expressive, intimate and charming little bugger of an album, that on more than one occasion points a finger in the general direction of the Floyd boys circa 1969. There is a prevailing eclectic shadow hanging over these tunes, that apart from generating a haphazard feel to things, actually works like a strange mythical binding agent. Together but apart… Just like More, you get treated to all kinds of differentiating tempers, that vary on the individual tracks and how they flow, weave and stack up against each other. I’ll be bold and say that Super Record feels connected and well-orchestrated, even if the proof in the pudding suggests otherwise… 
The opening cuts cement the Japanese adoration for the occult psychedelic - the larvalling oozing presence of lethargic slow moving guitars, that push through your speakers like a pair of somersaulting black birds immersing from a wall of black currant marmalade. Had this music been put out in Germany from around the same time, it surely would have received recognition as being part of the Krautrock scene(remember, Krautrock was largely a label we modern folks have conjured up in order to alphabetise our music collections to better ask for directions in the lands of sonic experimentation). 
Jumping almost casually from the big soupy psychedelic start, the listener is guided into a dream-like state of far East ragadelicious vibes with sitars and folk laden atmospheres with heaps of acoustic instruments, to the more western influenced parts of this album, where you get your rocks off while still feeling that oriental tinged feel of it all hovering above you like a see-through veil of sound. 
Much like More, Super Record also has its fair share of interludes/epilogues, whatever you want to call them, and they are of a surprisingly high quality. They are extremely necessary to these ears. The Sound 3 track for instance coming on every once in a while, actually 5 times in all, acts as short moments of unadulterated simplistic beauty wherever you encounter it. It’s merely a wobbly electric wah wahing guitar talking slowly and echoing to you, but it is just so infectious and riveting. Come to think of it, most of this record uses that same sort of musical laissez faire template. Apart from the obvious well- written ditties, you sense a wonderful open approach to music making that soaks everything in small glistening ornamentations. Whether it’s done with a psychedelic electric guitar, sitar, sparse squeaking synthesizer or a relentless tapping flow of natural sounding clay drums, there’s always a tremendous emphasis on the simplistic and natural within this album. 
Now when I say 'natural’, and have mentioned time and again the electric guitar - as well as a synthesiser, you can probably guess, that I mean something of the sort that pushes through in other areas than the factual ingredients of the album. I am of course speaking about the general vibe - the flow of things - how you feel transported out in the breathtaking natural wilderness of the far East - mountains, cherry blossoms, misty morning fogs flying overhead and all that you can possibly imagine transcribing in the natural environment around above and beneath you…. Just add a gazillion sonic fuelled rainbow colours swirling peacefully about in a constantly moving mosaic…… 
The music of Magical Power Mako never crossed my radar until I stumbled across his 1995 album “Lo Pop Diamonds” in my local library (in suburban Buffalo, of all places) and later discovered he was a featured artist in these Archives. That first encounter proved a less than ideal entry into the alternate universe of MPM, elsewhere known as Makoto Kurita when he isn’t hiding in his bedroom studio, conjuring his Magical Power. 
Thankfully this 1975 effort is something else entirely. And by “something else” I mean an almost uncanny funhouse-mirror reflection of his Western role models: something not uncommon in post- war Japan but elevated here to its creative zenith, where simple translation becomes original mutation. A blind headphone test would leave me convinced I was hearing a long-lost, early '70s Krautrock LP, instead of a home recording by a reclusive Japanese teenager with a tacky fringe haircut and a near-visionary understanding of his own interior cosmos. 
The album was recorded over a period of several years, and the music is (literally) all over the map, from backwoods Azerbaijan to rural Switzerland to beyond the Andromeda Galaxy…everywhere, apparently, except his native Japan. But Mako’s controls were set mainly for the heart of counterculture Germany. The album opener “Andromeda” reveals a kinship with Manuel Göttsching and ASH RA TEMPEL; the musical caravan of “Silk Road” carries echoes of Michael Karoli and CAN (in its strummed baglama and laser-beam electric guitars); and in “Pink Butch (LaLaLa)” the subtitle conveniently spells out the song’s entire lyrical content, breathlessly sung in the style of a narcoleptic Klaus Dinger. 
The latter half of the album alternates even more eclectic detours - medieval Normandy in “Majorica Resistance Song”; a child’s nursery in “Rock Baby in Meadow” - with pieces of a split interlude titled “Sound 3”, divided into five parts but totaling under four-minutes in combined length. Separating the tracks this way only increases the album’s overall sense of stylistic dislocation, appropriate for an artist described by psychedelic fanboy and “Japrocksampler” author Julian Cope as a “musical hermit”. 
After first hearing the skewed tinker-toy electropop of “Lo Pop Diamonds” (worth at least one spin, for the unexpected novelty) I was relieved, and more than a little thrilled, to be reminded that there are still magicians among us, weaving their powerful spells.......


Line-up / Musicians 
- Mako / various instruments 
- Butch / vocals 
- Rock / voice



Tracklist 
Butch Side 
A1 Andromeda 6:01 
A2 Tundra 3:12 
A3 Silk Road 4:17 
A4 Woman In South Island 2:36 
A5 Pink Butch (Lalala) 8:30 
Rock Side 
B1 Sound 3 0:49 
B2 Rock Baby In Meadow 2:36 
B3 Sound 3 0:26 
B4 Majorica Resistance Song 6:21 
B5 Sound 3 0:16 
B6 Cosmos Soundglass 3:22 
B7 Sound 3 0:11 
B8 Sound, Mother Earth 5:18 
B9 Sound 3 1:57 



Discography: 
MAGICAL POWER MAKO (Polydor, 1973) 
SUPER RECORD (Polydor, 1975) 
JUMP (Polydor, 1977) 
WELCOME TO EARTH (East World, 1979) 
MUSIC FROM HEAVEN (Marquee, 1981) 
MAGICAL COMPUTER MUSIC (1985) 
HAPPY EARTH (1985) 
NEXT MILLENNIUM VIBRATIONS (1993) 
TRANCE RESONANCE (Marquee, 1994) 
BLUE DOT (Atavistic, 1994) 
COSMO VISION (1994) 
HUMAN! GET OFF THE EARTH QUICKLY (1995) 
LO POP DIAMONDS (Marquee, 1996) 
NO GOVERNMENT AFTER REVOLUTION (1997) 
EROTIC ELOHIM (Kero Jetter, 1998) 
MAGIC (1998) 
HAPMONIYM 1972-75 (5CD Box Set) (MIO, 2002) 
COZMO GROSSO (2004) 

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