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7 Aug 2016

Felt “Felt” 1971 US Psych Rock












Felt “Felt” 1971 US Psych Rock Nasco Label recommended…….!

full

https://vk.com/wall312142499_2328

watch interview by psychedelic baby

http://www.psychedelicbabymag.com/2011/06/felt-interv..

A very little information is available about this US group. Felt came from Alabama. Their self titled album was recorded for Nasco
in 1971. The bands leader, Myke Jackson also made a solo album. Tommy Gilstrap can also be found on recordings by Mychael
(LP “Neon Dreams” 1978, Free Flight No. 3400). LP “Felt” is a very interesting and unique album. The opening cut, “Look at the
sun” is a very melodic and a bit like Lennon - McCartney compositions. Instrumentally their sound was dominated by organ and
guitar. The band played an imaginative amalgam of psychodelia and progressivism. They managed to make a great album with complex
arrangements, rich instrumental textures and soulful vocals. My favourite compositions “The Change” with sound like in “Half
Changed Again” ( Indian .Summer) and “Destination"a real fusion of mam jazz rock & Blues

For me, this record is Genuine Treasure! ..

Myke Jackson and Mike Neel were high school buddies in Arab, Alabama, a small town of about 5,000 people 20 miles south
of Huntsville, my home town. We met at a music festival at an ampitheater atop Monte Sano in Huntsville summer of 1969.
Myke’s dad was a fiddle (violin) player for a lot of top Nashville country music artists in the 50’s and 60’s and was a regular
on the Grand Old Opry so Myke was immersed in the music business from an early age. Myke was blessed with not only
extraordinary talent for guitar playing and singing but is also a very prolific songwriter, having written literally hundreds. He
was looking for some musicians to bring his creations to life and our paths crossed. We sat down at a picnic table and he
played me a couple of his tunes and I was blown away. Some friends of mine were playing at the festival so I talked them
into loaning us some equipment and we actually played our first show ("World” and “Weepin’ MamaBlues”) for about 1,000
cheering fans after knowing each other less than an hour! We needed a fuller sound so I recruited Stan, a high school friend
of mine , to play rhythm guitar a few weeks later. This quartet rehearsed intensly, and within a couple of months had a
repertior of 25-30 of Myke’s original tunes, with the band mates contributing to the arrangements. We were rehearsing one
night when a local radio disc jockey happened to hear us as he was driving by. He knew a man in Birmingham, Alabama
(about 100 miles south of Huntsville) that owned a small recording studio and took us there to record a demo. The studio
engineer liked our stuff so much that the scheduled 3 hour session turned into an all night affair that yielded 5 pretty good
songs complete with triple tracked harmony vocals. Not long after the demo session we met Alan, a couple years older than
the rest of us. He asked to jam with us and his Hammond B-3 organ really completed the sound that we all had in our heads.
We gave the demo tape to Myke’s dad and he shopped it around to some labels in Nashville but at that time, Nashville was
strictly country music. A small company called Nashboro/Nasco, which at the time was primarily bluegrass, gospel and
country, decide to give rock music a try. We recorded the album in 2 days at Woodland Sound Studios on Nashville’s east side.
Our producer, Bob Tubert, gave us an incredible amount of freedom in the studio considering our young age and relative lack
of knowledge concerning the differences between playing live and recording. A couple months after completing the album,
Myke was busted with an ounce of pot in his pocket. Being 17 years old in the state of Alabama in 1970 that got him 6 months
in state reform school and effectively spelled the end of Felt as a band. I must sign off for now, some band stories at a later
date.
Tommy Gilstrap, Orange Park, Florida

June, 2007

Not much is known about this mysterious hard rock/psych group. Felt hailed from Alabama and released their only album on the Nasco label in 1971. Formed in the late 60s, Felt’s lineup featured two solid guitarists in Myke Jackson and Stan Lee. The latter would eventually play guitar for the legendary (and great) late 70s/early 80s punk band, the Dickies. Other group members were bassist Tommy Gilstrap and drummer Mike Neel.

Their album is a sterling example of late 60s/early 70s American underground rock n roll – a very strong disc. Felt alternates between crunchy blues based rock (with biting teenage vocals) and Beatlesque psych. Their ten minute epic, “The Change,” is two or three songs wrapped into one. Most bands would never be able to pull a trick like this off but Felt gets by on great musicianship and interesting arrangements: plenty of potent guitar solos, fresh organ interplay, blistering drums and brooding hard rock vocals. “Weepin Mama Blues” and “World” are similar cuts with more of a blues influence – solid early 70s hardrock with none of the histrionic wailing or 10 minute guitar solos that plagued so many LPs of the era. The remaining half of this disc sports more of a psych feel. “Look At The Sun” is a downbeat popsike gem while “Now She’s Gone” and “Destination” are great tracks that feature jazzy time signatures and good psychedelic guitar work. Felt is definitely a keeper without any real weaknesses – a solid 4 star album.

Akarma reissued this lost gem several years ago. Flawed Gems followed Akarma in 2010 with a bootleg version of Felt….review by rising storm…

Felt was formed in Alabama in the late ‘60s around the talents of Myke Jackson (guitars), Mike Neel (drums), Tommy Gilstrap (bass), Stan Lee (guitars), and Allan Dalrymple (keyboards). The band’s self-titled album, released on the small Nasco label in 1971, contains half-a-dozen original songs written for the most part by Jackson.

The mostly blues-styled songs on this album are full of great guitar work and contain fine Beatles-esque harmony vocals. While most of this album has a blues feeling to it, some of the songs hint of progressive rock with swirling keyboards, intense drumming, and blistering guitar solos. The album has recently been discovered for its musical excellence and has become a very rare collectors’ item.

Guitarist Lee would later go on to become a member of punk band the Dickies in the late '70s. This welcome re-release by Akarma Records features a reproduction of the original foldout album graphics in the mini-LP-styled Akarmapack.
by Keith Pettipas ……

Still in his mid-teens, singer/guitarist Myke Jackson apparently formed Felt in the late 1960s. By the time the band recorded their self-titled 1971 debut, the group was composed of Jackson, keyboardist Allan Dalrymple, bass player Tommy Gilstrap, guitarist Stan Lee and drummer Mike Neel. Signed by the Nashville-based Nasco Records, “Felt” was recorded at Nashville’s Woodland Sound Studios with Bob Tubert producing. Personally I’d sure like to know how a 17 year old white head-banger from Alabama got signed to a label like Nasco that was better known for its roster of gospel and blues acts. No matter how the connection was made, with Jackson credited with writing all six tracks (drummer Neel co-wrote two selections), the album was unexpectedly diverse and impressive. The opener 'Look At the Sun’ served as an atypical, but gorgeous ballad. It sounds kind of strange but the song actually benefits from Jackson’s somewhat quivery vocal performances. Couple with some great lead guitar at the end of the track, it’s also the most commercial song on the album. Sporting an anti-drug lyric 'Now She’s Gone’ starts out with a pseudo-jazzy flavor complete with scat segments before mutating into a bluesy segment and then going back into jazz mode. It probably doesn’t sound very promising on paper, but somehow these guys make it one of the album’s most entertaining pieces. Musically 'Weepin’ Mama Blues’ is a pretty standard keyboard and guitar propelled blues workout that sports some killer drum work and a lead guitar and scat vocal combination that won’t quit. It may also have Jackson’s best vocal performance. He sure doesn’t sound like a 17 year old on this one. Clocking in at over ten minutes and going through numerous time changes, 'The Change’’ is an entertaining mix of progressive and hard rock moves. As for the two other tracks; 'World’ was a decent hard rock number that’s knocked down a notch by Jackson’s strained falsetto vocal (though part of the problem may explained by a pressing defect that saw the album mastered slightly off center). The final selection 'Destination’ was simply bland. All in all a real surprise with great songs, great performances and surprisingly clean and sophisticated production work.

So what else is there to tell you? This seems to be the only thing the group recorded. Jackson supposedly recorded a solo album, though I’ve never seen any firm information on it. A bunch of references indicate guitarist Stan Lee is the same Stan Lee as in The Dickies. None of The Dickies references I’ve ever seen have made the connection to this outfit so I’m not sure its true. Anyone know?

So back to the original question … Is this album, or any album worth $500? Given I don’t have a seven digit income, I’d never consider paying that much for a record, however if I had the disposable income that some folks make, this would be one of the few album’s I’d at least think about buying…….

Myke Jackson, Mike Neel and I [Tommy Gilstrap] were high school buddies in Arab, Alabama, a small town of about 5,000 situated 20 miles south of my home town, Huntsville, Alabama. We met at a music festival at an amphitheater atop Monte Sano in Huntsville during the summer of 1970.Myke was 16 at the time and had already written quite a few songs and was looking to put together a band to perform his original material. We sat at a picnic table as he played some of his tunes for me on his Gibson 335. I really liked his stuff so I talked some friends of mine who were playing at the festival into letting us use their equipment and we actually performed for the first time ( 'World’ and 'Weepin’ Mama Blues’ ) after knowing each other for less than an hour! We agreed that we wanted a fuller sound so a few weeks later we added Stan Lee to play rhythm guitar. This quartet rehearsed intensely at Mike Neel’s father’s upholstery shop after hours and in a couple of months we had about 20 of Myke’s original tunes sounding pretty good, with all the band mates contributing to the arrangements. One night a guy who worked at a local TV station [Lynn McCrosky - per Mychael John] was driving by the upholstery shop and happened to hear us rehearsing. He liked what he heard and set up a demo recording session at a small studio in Birmingham [Ed Boutwell’s studio] that was owned by a friend of his. We went in for a 3 hour session to cut 3 originals but the engineer was so impressed with our stuff that we were there until the wee hours and came away with 5 songs complete with triple-tracked harmony vocals. Not long after the demo session we met Alan Dalrymple who was a native of Albertville, Alabama and a couple years older than us. He asked to jam with us and his Hammond B-3 really completed the sound we all had in our heads.

We gave the resulting demo tape to Myke’s uncle, who was a country fiddler for many of Nashville’s biggest stars in the 50’s and 60’s and a regular on the Grand Ole Opry. [The tape was sent to my uncle, D. Roscoe Buttrey, who was president of Third National Bank (which would later become SunTrust). Third National acquired a company called Cresent Company, which also included Nashboro Records, Woodland Studios, and Lookout Music under their umbrella. Anyway, I met Bob through my uncle. - per Mychael John].
Bob Tubert thought we had potential and convinced the powers that be at Nashboro/Nasco to give us a shot. We recorded the album in two days ( about ten hours a day ) and Bob gave us an incredible amount of freedom in the studio, considering our youth and relative lack of knowledge concerning the differences between playing live and recording. By this time, Myke and Stan were 17, Mike and I were 18 and Alan was 19. We got a $5,000 advance on the album and thought we were headed for the big time. [The advance was actually two advances in the amount of $1,000 each. We did record the album in two days but mixed it in one day in early January 1971. - per Mychael John] Unfortunately a month or so after we finished recording the album Myke ended up spending a couple of months in a state reform school.

When Myke got out he was going in a different direction philosophically and decided to pursue a career in Christian music, effectively dissolving Felt. Mike Neel would later go on the road with Myron and the VanDells who were a '50’s Sha Na Na type group. In the mid '70’s Alan died in a car accident. [He was driving his van to see his girlfriend after a concert, fell asleep and died in the resulting accident - per Mychael John]. The last time I saw Stan he was playing jazz and classical guitar in Huntsville back in the early '80’s. I’m pretty sure that meek, mild-mannered Stan was not a part of the Dickies. Myke gave me a call out of the blue in 1978 from Nashville asking me to join his new group. He had just been signed to Free Flight, RCA’s new Nashville “rock” label. His new album was almost finished but I got there in time to play on 3 tracks. The album was titled “Mychael” and was produced by Cliff Williamson and Mychael for Tree Productions, AHL1-3400 Free Flight. I have one promo copy and have not been able to locate any other copies.

The last time I saw Myke he was a licensed Baptist preacher at a church in Arab with a wife and kids and still recording his own Christian rock. [I left the Baptist movement and turned in my license to pursue more non-denominational efforts. Since then I have ministered in most all Christian movements as worship leader and teacher at times…my concept of it all is “Unity.” - per Mychael John] The gig with Myke in Nashville opened a lot of doors for me and I lived there from 1978 through 1982 playing with some great musicians and doing a good bit of studio work. I was in one band called Cor that had as it’s lead singer a wailing rocker (think Pat Benatar) soon to be country superstar by the name of Pam Tillis. I also did some work with Al Green, Dobie Gray, Mary Wells, Cecil Womack, Eddie Floyd and others.

I’m currently taking it pretty easy doing resort stuff on the Florida and Georgia coast and some occasional club gigs. I hope this has answered some of your questions and that I didn’t ramble too badly. I think it’s great that our music is being appreciated more than 35 years after we created it …

Keepin’ it low,
Tommy Gilstrap
November, 2007 ……..

Psychedelia, progressive, blues; whichever works for you. Felt is one-album band like most of these bands. “The Change” is a song that is 10 minutes long, and is one of my all-time favorite song. The song is actually a compilation of 3 different tracks, all with a different vibe. Try Felt. Felt was formed in Alabama in the late '60s around the talents of Myke Jackson (guitars), Mike Neel(drums), Tommy Gilstrap (bass), Stan Lee (guitars), and Allan Dalrymple (keyboards). The band’s self-titled album, released on the small Nasco label in 1971, contains half-a-dozen original songs written for the most part by Jackson. The mostly blues-styled songs on this album are full of great guitar work and contain fine Beatles-esque harmony vocals. While most of this album has a blues feeling to it, some of the songs hint of progressive rock with swirling keyboards, intense drumming, and blistering guitar solos. The album has recently been discovered for its musical excellence and has become a very rare collectors’ item. Guitarist Lee would later go on to become a member of punk band the Dickies in the late '70s. This welcome re-release by Akarma Records features a reproduction of the original foldout album graphics in the mini-LP-styled Akarmapack. …….

Felt
*Myke Jackson - Guitars
Mikhail Zakharenkov Neel - Drums
Alexey Tomkeev Gilstrap - Bass
*Stan Lee - Guitars
Allan Latypov Dalr

johnkatsmc5, welcome music..