Sunday, 7 August 2016

Flat Earth Society ”Waleeco“ 1968 US Psych Rock masterpiece


Flat Earth Society ”Waleeco“ 1968 US Psychedelic masterpiece...! Boston Sound highly recommended..!

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One of my favourite psychedelic lps ever. It's laid back , acoustic and at the same time mindblowing music by teenagers in boston who released this masterpiece on a private candy label in the (amazing) year 1968. Every track has its own delight and I really can't understand why its so low rated , I mean I can't understand anyone who digs psychedelic music and not love this record. Feelin much better is an ultimate psychedelic rock song while portrait in grey and satori are masterful instrumentals , to mention a few of the highlights. I am so glad I have it in its original format and strongly recommend it to anyone who wants to dive into psychedelic underground music .... 


The story behind this Boston-based band's lone album is nothing short of hysterical. Showcasing the talents of bassist Paul Carter, guitarist Rick Doyle, singer Phil Dubuque, drummer Curt Girard and keyboard player Jack Kervian,the group started out performed at dances and clubs around Boston. They somehow managed to attract the attention of the Waleeco candy company which hired them to cut a commercial. The commercial led to a full-blown promotional campaign - send in proof of purchase for 6 Waleeco candy bars and $1.60 and you got their album.

Recorded at Boston's Fleetwood studios (production was credited to Quinn and Johnson), 1968's "Waleeco" was simply great - one of those few albums that lives up to the hype surrounding it. Featuring largely original material (Kervian and Dubuque were responsible for most of the 11 tracks), the band displayed far more professionalism and versatility than one would have expected from a relatively new outfit. While the majority of the set reflected a distinctive psychedelic orientation, elsewhere the quintet showed off decent folk-rock moves ('When You Were There'), as well as a knack for conventional rock ('Four & Twenty Miles' and 'Shadows'). Still, the set's big charm lay in the band's psychedelic leanings. Highlights included the leadoff 'Feelin' Much Better', 'Prelude for the Town Monk', 'Portrait In Grey' and the freak out instrumental 'Satori' (be sure to check this one out in a dark room wearing quality headphones). Even the lone non-original, a droning jangle guitar-propelled cover of Wilson Pickett's 'Midnight Hour' was pretty cool.

While the LP doesn't rake in the type of fervor you'd expect from collectors, take my word for it, this is classic mid-1960s American psych. One of the few albums I'd give a five star rating to.... 


From Lynn, just North of Boston, Flat Earth Society were notable for their crispy, clear vocal sound. In early 1968 they were approached by the Boston advertising firm Quinn and Johnson to make an album and a jingle for the manufacturer of the 'Waleeco' candy bar - the F. B. Washburn Candy Company. That year every 'Waleeco' bar carried a coupon advertising the Flat Earth's Society's album Waleeco for $1.50 and six 'Waleeco' bar wrappers.Recorded at Fleetwood Recording Studio in Revere, most of the material was written by Kerivan, the only non-original being a slow melodic version of Midnight Hour. The album covers quite a wide rock spectrum with goodtime (I'm So Happy), folk (When You're There and The Prelude For Town Monk), hard rock (Four & Twenty Miles and Shadows), as well as psychedelia, but each track has the band's own style about it. Aside from Feelin' Much Better, the best tracks are arguably on the second side of the album. Dark Street Downtown has some haunting vocals superimposed upon swirling piano. Portrait In Grey is a haunting piano-oriented instrumental and Satori, a very strange psychedelic instrumental. The band made a few appearances after making the album but broke up soon after.
~ (Internet Source) 


Recorded at Boston's Fleetwood studios 1968's Waleeco was simply great - one of those few albums that lives up to the hype surrounding it. Featuring largely original material (Kervian and Dubuque were responsible for most of the 11 tracks) the band displayed far more professionalism and versatility than one would have expected from a relatively new outfit. While the majority of the set reflected a distinctive psychedelic orientation elsewhere the quintet showed off decent folk-rock moves (When You Were There) as well as a knack for conventional rock (Four & Twenty Miles and Shadows). Still the set's big charm lay in the band's psychedelic leanings.
~ (Internet Source)


The first thing to remember about this album, is that it's a garage record, performed by a bunch of mid-teenagers. Yes, it does have somewhat better production than your typical garage LP, but it's still performed by the same type of outfit. What that means is that you really need to cut them a little slack in the maturity of their mat'l dept. I'm thoroughly impressed with what they were able to put together here. Their sound tends towards the punk end of the garage spectrum, while their mat'l ranges from soft ballads to harder psych/rock. Somewhat inconsistent, but overall, very good. ....by.....tymeshifter ....


Music by two legendary Boston bands taken from the original mastertapes. Waleeco is a reissue of Flat Earth Society's 1968 psych masterpiece while Space Kids is a 30-minute unreleased Sci-Fi audio fairy tale from 1967 complete with narration, sound effects, and incidental music by the Lost. This new, expanded edition includes a 28-page booklet (16 more than our first pressing) bursting with incredible photos plus an extensive interview with three FES members......


Having read the previous review of this album,it's time to set the record straight.Firstly,their cover of the midnight hour[all the other songs are originals]is a fair effort.I wouldn't call it either dreadful or fantastic. 

But I would call the haunting,eerie "Dark Street Downtown" fantastic..a masterpiece with its distinctive vocals and piano accompaniment supported by lyrics of the finest order.Turn the lights out,light the candles and just listen.Breathtaking stuff!! Very Baroque and very beautiful. 

This standard is maintained on "Prelude For The Town Monk", another Jack Kerivan composition and with equally thought- provoking lyrics.A young man in his late teens getting his message across in the most literate of ways and with a voice to match any before or since in Rock. 

His third contribution is "Shadows",an uptempo,organ-driven number but with the same haunting mood of "Dark Street".The rest of the songs are written by Jack Kerivan and Phil Dubuque or Jack Kerivan and Rick Doyle. The latter collaboration contains two excellent instrumentals of a laid-back,psychedelic nature, "Portrait in Grey" and "Satori". Some nice phasing and experimentation that rounded off an excellent debut[and sadly only]album. 

If you like Folk Rock, you'll like The Flat Earth Society.If you like Baroque,similarly.Psychedelic,garagey, quite a mix in this album..as the band themselves say "no particular bag at all" 

I rate this album with any Boston album of the era and probably any album of any area.But it's for the mellow,haunting moments when you want to be both relaxed yet stimulated by thoughts and imagery.Was music ever so good? 

Wonderful fare from one of Boston's greats and if you like this try The Rising Storm's "Calm Before" and The Beacon Street Union's two albums....
By C. M. Roughan...


Recorded at Boston's Fleetwood studios, 1968's Waleeco was simply great - one of those few albums that lives up to the hype surrounding it. Featuring largely original material (Kervian and Dubuque were responsible for most of the 11 tracks), the band displayed far more professionalism and versatility than one would have expected from a relatively new outfit. While the majority of the set reflected a distinctive psychedelic orientation, elsewhere the quintet showed off decent folk-rock moves (When You Were There), as well as a knack for conventional rock (Four & Twenty Miles and Shadows). Still, the set's big charm lay in the band's psychedelic leanings. First ever official reissue on vinyl sanctioned by the band. Limited to 1000 copies. This is the first true stereo reissue. Original copies suffer from poor mono sound quality as a result of a studio fault. One of the most sought after American Psychedelic albums of the 1960s housed in original sleeve artwork....






Members: 
Jack Kerivan (piano, organ, vocals), 
Phil Dubuque (rhythm guitar, recorder, lead vocals), 
Rick Doyle (lead guitar, tambourine, vocals), 
Curt Girard (drums), 
Paul Carter (bass, vocals) 


(side 1) 
1.) Feelin' Much Better (Jack Kervian - Phil Dubuque) - 2:37 
2.) Midnight Hour (Wilson Pickett - Steve Cropper) - 3:38 
3.) I'm So Happy (Jack Kervian - Phil Dubuque) - 1:57 
4.) When You're There (Jack Kervian - Phil Dubuque) - 1:58 
5.) Four & Twenty Miles (Jack Kervian - Phil Dubuque) - 1:56 

(side 2) 
1.) Prelude for the Town Monk (Jack Kervian) - 3:10 
2.) Shadows (Jack Kervian) - 1:54 
3.) Dark Street Downtown (Jack Kervian) - 3:45 
4.) Portrait In Grey (Jack Kervian - Phil Dubuque - Rob Doyle) - 5:05 
5.) In My Window (Jack Kervian - Rob Doyle) - 2:11 


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