Tuesday, 30 August 2016

Kerrs Pink “Mellom Oss” 1981 Norway Prog Rock

Kerrs Pink “Mellom Oss” 1981  excellent  Norway Prog Rock ..recommended..! reissued  in  CD with extra bonus tracks.
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KERRS PINK is one of the few Norwegian bands that chose to play Progressive rock music. But what a great choice it was ! Since the second part of the Seventies and its first eponymous album (1980), the group led by Harald LYTOMT and Jostein HANSEN mixes Scandinavian folklore and refined English art-rock music in the manner of CAMEL ("Mirage" era). The following year, "Mellom Oss" pursued and bettered this subtle blend, with even more symphonism. Hardly all titles were re-recorded by the group (For better sound quality) to be included on the Musea reissue, along with six bonus-tracks. Reformed in 1989, KERRS PINK worked on "A Journey On The Inside" (1993), a concept-album full of the strength and experience. "Art Of Complex Simplicity" (1997) offers themes stamped by great melodic and instrumental beauty, with superb guitar and keyboards parts. This fresh and pastoral music remind KEBNEKAISE, RAGNARÖK or today's CAMEL. "Tidings" (2002) is its fifth album, with a new lead singer (And splendid female backing vocals), and a second keyboardist. The band’s music has always been a clever and subtle mix of Scandinavian folk music (Some melodies and rythms), and Progressive rock music. Here is one of the musicians’ best work, sophisticated and dynamic. Their music has lost nothing of its freshness and sincerity, but also now reveals a very professional talent for arrangements and playing. Beautiful melodies, nice guitar soli, ambitious musical structures: mixing influences like CAMEL or PINK FLOYD amongst others, KERRS PINK offers us an exceptional album, with a beautiful booklet and an excellent production. Not to be missed !.....~


In August 1980 Tore Johansen left the Kerrs PINK, feeling he needed a break, followed a little later by Terje Solaas, which was offered a job away from the area that the band was leased. The band found a new drummer in Tore Fundingsrud, while they had also built his own studio in the barn Harald Lytomt in Trømborg. In this barn was recorded her new disc recorded in 4 channels between September and November 81, released in Pottittskiver in autumn of the year under the heading “Mellom Oss”. 

This was definitely an upgrade for the premiere, with a well-structured disk and slightly melodic Progressive Rock Symphonic CAMEL in line with a more developed sound, like German bands like ROUSSEAU or ANYONE’S DAUGHTER. Again the centerpiece of the work is the guitar Harald Lytomt, which now offers series of melodic solos and impressive melodies, definitely in a more consistent performance than “Kerrs Pink”, his first album. Some nice vibes Folk with the use of acoustic guitars and a couple of more melancholic songs with a Scandinavian feel appearing on some tracks, led by the parties violates guest Tormod Gangflot. All the vocals are nice, sung in Norwegian, and there is more room for some good keyboard textures, though these are still at a secondary level. The greatest achievement of the group was the addition of a good Epic range of 17 minutes duration. “Mens tiden Forgar” which is very soft and melodic in an atmosphere of Sinfonic Rock with excellent vocals, Folk tones with acoustic sounds and flute units à la CAMEL and many electric guitar outbursts, based on soft soils, with passages of vintage organs. 

The Musea reissue of the CD comes with a bonus six extra tracks, five of which are new, almost in a similar vein album tracks. The style remains a relaxed and very melodic progressive rock, always with the guitar in evidence. …. 
Well this production is excellent, as the sound quality is really good. In fact the re-issue of their second album is absolutely remarkable: in particular I like to make a special mention for the long suite - The 17 minute "Where Time Fades Away", featuring a guest female vocalist, although the immediate comparison to be made for their style is to that one of CAMEL. The "light symphonic" guitar-solos in the vein of Andy Latimer (think for example of the Romantic guitar solo within the splendid instrumental "Ice" by CAMEL) often leading the harmonic structure, are also balanced by a good amount of some simple keyboards. Their mood is always very relaxing, without being involved with complex music explorations. Recommended for the lovers of this particular genre only!!....by lor68 ....~


The opener for the CD release of Kerrs Pink’s second album “Mellom Oss” is in fact the track “Mellom Oss”. The original vinyl LP release started with “Trostevise” (“Comforting Tune). If you compare these two versions of the tune "Mellom Oss”, you will find an added theme for the re-recorded CD version.No doubt the CD version has a better sound and mix. This tune offers you symphonic rock coupled with some Greek sounding folk! Harald’s guitar sounds like a lasar cutting sharply and alight through the dark sky! ….~

In August 1980 Tore Johansen left the Kerrs PINK, feeling he needed a break, followed a little later by Terje Solaas, which was offered a job away from the area that the band was leased. The band found a new drummer in Tore Fundingsrud, while they had also built his own studio in the barn Harald Lytomt in Trømborg. In this barn was recorded her new disc recorded in 4 channels between September and November 81, released in Pottittskiver in autumn of the year under the heading “Mellom Oss”. 
This was definitely an upgrade for the premiere, with a well-structured disk and slightly melodic Progressive Rock Symphonic CAMEL in line with a more developed sound, like German bands like ROUSSEAU or ANYONE’S DAUGHTER. Again the centerpiece of the work is the guitar Harald Lytomt, which now offers series of melodic solos and impressive melodies, definitely in a more consistent performance than “Kerrs Pink”, his first album. Some nice vibes Folk with the use of acoustic guitars and a couple of more melancholic songs with a Scandinavian feel appearing on some tracks, led by the parties violates guest Tormod Gangflot. All the vocals are nice, sung in Norwegian, and there is more room for some good keyboard textures, though these are still at a secondary level. The greatest achievement of the group was the addition of a good Epic range of 17 minutes duration. “Mens tiden Forgar” which is very soft and melodic in an atmosphere of Sinfonic Rock with excellent vocals, Folk tones with acoustic sounds and flute units à la CAMEL and many electric guitar outbursts, based on soft soils, with passages of vintage organs. 
The Musea reissueof the CD comes with a bonus six extra tracks, five of which are new, almost in a similar vein album tracks. The style remains a relaxed and very melodic progressive rock, always with the guitar in evidence.....~


Kerrs Pink was one of the leading bands of the Norwegian folk-rock movement during the early 80's, their style has often been compared to the mellow and gentle style of Camel along with traditional folk influences and they have a very comforting and melodic style to their songs. "Mellom Oss" is their second release and shows us this very well. The musicianship is steady and songwriting is solid throughout, with a special mention to guitarist Harald Lytomt's clearly Andy Latimer influenced playing. This album shows a few weaker signs in some of the shorter songs, like "Trøstevise" which is rather forgettable, but the wonderful 17 minute closing epic, "Mens Tiden Forgår", makes up for most of it and stands as the best piece on the album as well as being an essential listening to any prog fan. Another highlight is the wonderful instrumental "Østenfor Ord" which combines Progressive Rock with Folk wonderfully and is a standout of the shorter songs. The other material is fairly good and in the same style. A couple of songs have lyrics which are in Norwegian, but that could work as a charming element for non-Norwegian listeners. 
The CD version of this album is in a fact a re-recorded one, although very faithful to the original version. The reason for this are that the original album was recorded on a 4-track recorder which (obviously) coulnd't offer a sound quality good enough to be appreaciated. I must say I haven't heard the original version yet, but the sound quality here is really good and you can hear all instuments clearly throughout. In addition to that, you get six bonus tracks which are a treat for fans especially although the album material is more interesting, in my opinion. Although not a perfect album, this is a fine listen if you like bands in the style of Camel or Kebnekaise. 

Highlights include "Østenfor Ord" and "Mens Tiden Forgår". The latter one being the best track here and one of Norwegian prog's finest moments. A very good and promising album, worth checking out if you like lighter prog-rock with folk influences, although it might be difficult to find these days it's worth it if you dig stuff like this....by Bj-1 ...~


Having not heard the original 1981 release, I cannot comment on whether the re-recording does it justice, but I can say it sounds great and crystal clear. It's a beautiful symphonic album with plenty of references to the softer sides of Camel (especially in the lead guitars) and Focus, but with more of a folky and upbeat melancholic, Norwegian bent. Mellom Oss is mostly instrumental but does contain vocals in a few tracks. 
The title track opens things up in a representative way. Jangling guitars, languid leads, diffuse keyboards and bouncy generally simple melodies all characterize the sound of this album. "Tröstevise" contains somewhat aggressive vocals set to a eastern European sort of motif. Quite fascinating. "Ostenfor Ord" is one of the real highlights, as it plays to all the band's strengths. It contains a very emotional tune, bluesy lead guitar, crisp 12 strings, and a gentle viola solo by Tormod Gangfløt, backed by convincing percussion. "Hvem Snakker Til Meg?" is another song in a similar vein to "Tröstevise" but contains a harder rhythm guitar that seems to be having fun playing off the organ and drums/bass. Some fantastic runs here. "Elegi" is short for elegant as far as I can tell from its arrangement. 
By far the longest track is "Mens Tiden Forgar", which seems to alternate between early 80s style KC guitars, Camel-like flutes, and varied reflective vocals as it goes along. It's a qualified success and certainly does contain a number of interesting moments, taking a few listens to really digest. "Marius" and "Parademarsj For Jubilanter" are both jaunty tunes, and the first sounds like some vocals would enhance its effect. In general if there is a problem here, it is the preponderance of such types of instrumentals. The group could have stretched out more, and it would have helped all the material to be in more diverse company. 
Nonetheless, this is a highly worthwhile Scandinavian prog album from a long lived band. Between us, I think it merits 4 stars.....by kenethlevine ...~


I have the re-issue which isn't a remastered version of the original recording, but a complete re-recording of that album. The original had mellotron on it, this doesn't. This is fairly mellow with some nice guitar leads.There are only two tracks on this album that really impress me. 
"Mellom Oss" is one of those tracks. Melancholic with synths and some great guitar to open. The tempo picks up before a minute. Nice bass followed by some outstanding guitar. That light uptempo melody is back as the contrasts continue. Just a cool sounding tune. "Trostevise" is almost polka-like.Yikes ! "Trostevals" opens with piano and is joined by the violin. Not a fan. "Ostinfor Ord" is the other song I really like.The guitar takes the lead early as bass throbs. Violin takes over 1 1/2 minutes in as the guitar stops. The intro melody is back 2 1/2 minutes in, it reminds me of CAMEL. The guitar lights it up 5 minutes in. Nice. "Hvem Snakker Til Meg ?" is a good song. I like the guitar, and we get some vocals after 1 1/2 minutes. The organ after 4 minutes is a nice touch. 

"Elegi" opens with some good guitar before that polka vibe returns. Thankfully it doesn't break out into a "Lookimpickled Polka"-like tune. "Mens Tiden Forgar" is the 17 minute closer. We get some female vocals on this one. It builds to a guitar / drum / bass melody before settling back down 2 1/2 minutes in as flute arrives. Vocals with strummed guitar before 4 minutes.Female vocals follow. Organ before 7 1/2 minutes that comes and goes. The flute is back after 11 minutes. Male vocals a minute later as it continues to be pastoral. Before 15 minutes we finally get a little passion as the guitar and organ come in to end it in style. 

I feel like i'm being generous giving this 3 stars, but then i'm not a huge fan of Folk music (or polka).....by Mellotron Storm ....~


In August 1980 Tore Johansen left Kerrs Pink, feeling he needed a break, followed a bit later by Terje Solaas, who was offered a job far from the area the band was located.The band found a new drummer in Tore Fundingsrud, while they also had built their own studio in Harald Lytomt's barn in Trømborg.They recorded the follow-up to ''Kerrs Pink'' on a 4-track recorded between September and November 81', released on Pottittskiver at the fall of the year under the title ''Mellom oss''. 
This was definitely an upgrade to the debut, being a nicely structured, slightly CAMEL-esque, melodic Symphonic/Progressive Rock with a more developed sound, similar to German bands like ROUSSEAU or ANYONE'S DAUGHTER.Again the centerpiece of the arrangements is Harald Lytomt's guitar, which now offers series of melodic solos and impressive melodies, definitely in a more consistent performance than on ''Kerrs Pink''.Some nice folky vibes with the use of acoustic guitars and a couple of more melancholic tunes with a Scandinavian feel appear on a few tracks, led by the viola parts of guest Tormod Gangflot.The vocals are nice, all delivered in Norwegian, and there is more room for some good keyboard textures, although these are still in a secondary role.The biggest achievement of the group though was the addition of a very good epic track, the 17-min. ''Mens tiden forgar''.Quite mellow and atmospheric melodic Symphonic Rock with excellent, warm vocals, folky overtones with acoustic soundscapes and CAMEL-esque flute drives and plenty of electric guitar explosions, based on smooth solos, along with vintage organ passages. 
The Musea CD reissue comes with a bonus of six extra tracks, of which five are previously unreleased, pretty much in a similar vein as the tracks of the regular album.Maybe a light jazzy influence is apparent in these cuts along with a more upfront keyboard parts, but no more or less the style remains a relaxed and very melodic Progressive Rock, always with the guitar in evidence.''Fredsmarsjen'' was used actually in the 82' compilation/sampler album ''Jomfrutur'' of Pottittskiver. 
Nice, easy-going and sensitive Progressive Rock by the Norwegians.The CD reissue is propably a better purchase due to its very good additional material.Anyway, both issues are great examples of early-80's Progressive Rock with old-school references, strongly recommended, especially if you love CAMEL...3.5 stars..... by apps79 ...~


Ohh, delightful prog folk from Norway! They mix traditional music from their country with some terrific Camel-like symphonic rock. As one might have guessed, lots of great guitar lines here (both acoustic and electric). There are some nice keyboards too, but unfortunalty not much. My CD is a re-recording of the original early 80´s album, with a few line up changes. I guess it would be nice to hear the vinyl version for historical and curiosity reasons, but really the new tracks are very well produced while the early ones were not, according to what I heard. Anyway, the music here is very good, even if not all the tracks are great. 
I really loved Harald Lytomt´s guitar playing: very melodic, very fluid, in the best David Gilmour/Andy Latimer tradition. But the whole band is quite good. As for the songs themselves the quality varies quite a lot, going from excellent (Mens Tiden Forgar) to average (the polka-like Tröstevise really was an unfortunate choice for the second track). However none is bad, and the playing is always top notch. Vocals are all sung in their native language, and Halvard Haugerud´s voice is only ok, but they are mostly an instrumental band anyway. Highlight of the CD is obviously the side long 17 minute epic Mens Tiden Forgar, a wonderful piece of symphonic prog that is really worth the price fo the album, with its several tempo and mood changes, captivating melodies and beautiful flute, guitar and keys interplay. The ending solo is one of the most emotional and poignant I have heard in many years. 

There are six bonus tracks that although not really outstandig, are a nice addition for they are in same spirit of the original ones. 

Conclusion: if you like Camel and prog folk, this is a must have. I´m really glad to have this one and I´d like to thank Kenneth Levine for advising about this interesting norwegian group. Even if you´re not really fond of prog folk, it´s worth checking this one out anyway..... by Tarcisio Moura ...~


Kerrs Pink is a Norwegian progressive band that fuses progressive rock and Scandinavian folklore just as Grieg married symphonic music and Nordic folk songs. The music also pays homage to bands like Camel and String Driven Thing. Kerrs Pink is Tore Fundingsrud (drums), Jostein Hansen (bass, guitars, and vocals), Harald Lytomt (guitars, flute, keyboards and bass), and Per-Öyvind Nordberg (keyboards). Mellom Oss is a reissue of Kerrs Pink's second album recorded in 1981 plus six previously unreleased bonus tracks. Mellom Oss was originally recorded on an old four-track recorder. With today's technology and Kerrs Pink's improved studio they decided to rerecord the first six tracks, making this CD a pseudo-reissue. Their seventeen minute opus from the LP, "Mens Tiden Forgår (While Time Fades Away)," is a remixed version of the original recording. The CD booklet, as always is true with Musea releases, contains extensive historical notes and English lyrics even though they are sung in Norwegian. Another highly recommended reissue from the European progressive archives...by Henry Schneider......~



The uniqueness of Kerrs Pink - in their devotion to native penates. Realizing in time that the race for world glory of good will not bring, the Norwegian ensemble decided to be content with the small. Of course, to sell the debut album independently - it's a troublesome business. But in this there was a certain reason: the press and the public felt sincerity and a complete lack of "starry" musicians. So, as far as possible, they tried to support the artists: someone with a good review, and some with material. In general, the participants of Kerrs Pink had a sin to complain about the lack of feedback from the audience. Compatriots sympathized with the young progressors. And this stimulated new creative feats.
The program "Mellom Oss" was created by the guys in Harald Lutomt's home studio (guitar, flute, auxiliary keyboards and bass). Conditions close to primitive: banal four-track tape recorder. However, having spent two long autumn months on the recording session, the friends managed to achieve a very high quality sound (not least thanks to the talent of the sound engineer Lars-Tore Lande). However, technology - technology, but what interests us first of all is the material. Let's try to delve into it in detail. 

Lyrical space Pink Floyd and Eloy , tender melancholy Camel, accessibility on the brink of pop rock - all this is the introductory title number of the instrumental property. Not that it is promising, although quite decently (especially by the standards of 1981). Next on the list grotesque tavern "stunt" "Trøstevise" by the keyboard player Halvard Hoegerud with his own theatrical vocals and background hymns of hypothetical Scandinavian woodcutters. But in the track "Trøstevals" the joker Harald opens from an entirely different angle: before us is an exceptionally subtle chamber drama, which benefits from the presence of guest viola player Tormod Gangflot. The play "Østenfor Ord" equalizes the sentimental art start with the melody of hard rock guitar solos, the echoes of the northern folk and the touching of string episodes; well-built view without a complaint, but with taste. Behind the facade of the pompous design "Hvem Snakker Til Meg?" the commercial nature of the action is guessed, and if there is not a stormy dialogue under the curtain from the flagshipsKerrs Pink, lingering on it would not be worth it at all. The wordless etude "Elegi" combines the rhythm of village motifs, the heart revelations of an electric guitar bathed in affectionate "Hammond" waves, and the monotonously dispassionate accompaniment of the tandem Tore Fundingsrud (percussion) - Justin Hansen (bass, vocals). Finally, after the "flowers" and "ryushechek" in the field of hearing, the most important is the 17-minute suite "Mens Tiden Forgår", composed solely by Hansen. Pastoral flute excursions evoke memories of happy childhood days, acoustic folk moments coexist with blues psychedelia, the bewitching timbre of Kirsten Hognestad Bon is full of fairy romantic charm, while the tonal electric ending is Camel-expressive and somewhere strict. Whatever one may say, the panorama is colorful, intersectional bows are driven with the same degree of dexterity, and the performing professionalism is evident. What else is there to wish for? 

I sum up : it's not a masterpiece of progressives, but in its own way a curious artistic act worthy of the attention of a music lover. The choice is yours....sound voyager.......~


Kerrs Pink enjoys a rather important reputation in international progressive rock circles, despite long-lasting obscurity in Norway and an unstable career marked by numerous break-ups and lineup changes. The group has recorded five albums in its first 30 years of existence. All have been released or reissued by the French prog rock label Musea. The music is most notable for its blend of Scandinavian folk elements with the vintage British symphonic prog sound of the ‘70s. 

Kerrs Pink, named after a variety of potatoes, formed in 1972 in Trømborg, a small Norwegian town. Of the four original members, all aged 15 to 17 at the time, only Jostein Hansen would continue to carry the torch. Essentially a cover band at first, the group also used the names "Memories" and "Cash Pink" in its early years, which it spent in basements and dance halls. The first major change in personnel occurred in 1975 when guitarist Harald Lytomt was recruited. Hansen, who previously played guitar, too, switched to bass. This pair would later form the die-hard core of the band and write most of its material. In March 1976 the group performed its first "real" concert and began to focus on original songs. It took another three years before the members found the guts and the money to self-produce their first single. Released on their own label, Pottittskiver, "Kong Edvardt"/"Feberlåten" attracted good press and sold out its limited run of a thousand copies. Galvanized, Kerrs Pink entered the studio of Höst guitarist Svein Rönning in the summer of 1980 to record its self-titled debut LP, also self-released later that year. The lineup at this point included Lytomt, Hansen, Halvard Haugerud, Tore Johansen, Trond Böhn, and Terje Solaas. The instrumental track "Velkomst" reached the national Top Ten in early 1981. A second LP, Mellom Oss, came out in January 1982 and featured a new drummer in Tore Fundingsrud. The cost of self-production and lack of commitment from some of the musicians led to the band's first breakup. Bøhn left during the recording sessions, Lytomt and Fundingsrud followed shortly after the LP's release to form the harder-edged Mantra. Hansen and Haugerud continued for a while as a pop/rock unit before things ground to a halt. 

In 1989, Musea expressed interest in reissuing Kerrs Pink's two LPs, which rekindled a flame in Hansen. He re-formed the group with former members Johansen, Fundingsrud, and Lytomt, plus Mantra's keyboardist Per Øyvind Nordberg. This lineup re-recorded Mellom Oss for its 1992 reissue, contributed to the Musea project Seven Days of a Life (1993), and recorded the ambitious concept album A Journey of the Inside (also 1993). This outburst of activity was followed by an extended hiatus. Tired of waiting, Lytomt began work on a solo album in 1996. He asked Hansen to provide lyrics, and in the end, Art of Complex Simplicity came out in 1997 under Kerrs Pink's name, featuring a cast of former members and studio musicians. After another break, Hansen and Lytomt recruited a fresh lineup, including two keyboardists and male and female lead singers, to record 2002's Tidings. ~ François Couture.....~



 Biography
Norwegian band playing progressive rock combined with Scandinavian folk. Currently appearing in the composition - Harald Lytomt (lead guitar), Per Langsholt (bass), Simen Løvholen (keys, guitar), Magne Johansen (drums), Glenn Fosser (keyboards) and Geir R. Eggesbø-Olsen (vocals). Their musical fascinations are British symphonic rock of the 70s, and especially the formations - Camel and Pink Floyd . 
Established in 1972 in Trømborg, a small town south of Oslo. The initiator was the then sixteen-year-old guitarist and vocalist Jostein Hansen. The formation will also be supported by drummer Tommy Knudson, bassist Frank Johnsen and lead guitarist Leif Hansen (privately Jostein's cousin). Everyone was at a similar age. Their initial repertoire consisted of covers, especially from Pink Floyd repertoire , Creedence Clearwater Revival , Uriah Heep , Yes and Steppenwolf. At the beginning of the following year, the name was changed - for Cash Pink, and also for the first reshuffle in the lineup - for the positions of Leif Hansen and Frank Johnsen, Kay Gunnar Lødengen, Odda Frydenlund and additionally Kjela Austada. This setting did not last too long, because already in October 1974 with the group said goodbye - Kay, Odd and Kjel. They were replaced by Harald Lytomt, Tore Johansen and Torild Johansen. The first of them brought to the group not only a great guitar and flute playing, but also a composer's talent, energy and determination to act. He also managed to convince Joestein to switch to a bass guitar. In August of the following year, new musicians had to be sought again, all by the departure of Tore and Torild. In their place, Pera Frydenlund was welcomed. Interestingly, three months later Torild joined the group again. Unfortunately, in March 1976, due to his military appointment, the founder Jostein Hansen had to part with the formation. 
That's when the musicians decided to change their name to Kerrs Pink, associated with the potato variety, grown in Norway. The sign was supposed to combine the dependence between underground and traditional Norwegian folk. At the same time, it should be mentioned that these annoying, because frequent changes in the composition were caused by the musicians' approach to playing - they treated them simply as fun, and besides they were still amateurs. From that moment - the driving force in the formation became the tandem Lytomt - Hansen. For the first time under the new name they performed a month later, in May they recorded their first demo with the song "Hverdag" and as a cassette they sent it to the Swedish radio. In November meanwhile to Kerrs PinkJostein came back and Tom Lunde said goodbye. In June 1977 there was a change in the position of one of the guitarists - Torild Johansen replaced Per Kvaerner. Five months the composition increased by keyboardist Halvard Haugerud. In this setting, the formation gave as many as ten concerts. 

In January 1979, in their own label Pottittskiver - they released their debut single "Kong Edvardt" / "Feberlåten". It was also the time of replacing the drummers - Klemmentsrud, who had been in the group from the very beginning, left and Terje Solaas took his place. In August Frydenlund took his leave, replaced by Tore Johansen, and a month later Trond Bøhn took over the guitar from Pera. In this setting, the group recorded their first full-length album, simply entitled "Kerrs Pink", which was released in January 1980. The publisher has collected great reviews. Unfortunately, a few months later, Tore Johansen left the warehouse, explaining the tiredness and need for rest. In January of the following year, Solaas, who was replaced by Tore Fundingsruda, followed in his footsteps. In this arrangement, the group decided to start working on the new material. For this purpose, they even built their own studio. Unfortunately, it was recorded on a four-track tape recorder and the sound quality left a lot to be desired. The second album "Mellom Oss" premiered in January 1982. In thirteen compositions, Bøhn appeared only in two, and then left the squad to focus on the family. Unexpectedly - the group began to fall apart. Lytomt and Fundingsrud left Unexpectedly - the group began to fall apart. Lytomt and Fundingsrud left Unexpectedly - the group began to fall apart. Lytomt and Fundingsrud leftKerrs Pink and founded a new Mantra formation. 
Quite unexpectedly, in 1989, the French label Musea, which published prog rock music, proposed a re-edition of two CDs by the group. Because the publishing houses sold very well - the record company asked musicians to publish unpublished recordings. Lytomt, Hansen and Johansen decided that it would be best to reactivate the band. For the full line-up, they needed a keyboardist and a drummer. The first was Per Øyvind Nordberg, the second - again Tore Fundingsrud. In the meantime, the track "Monday Man" was recorded for the needs of the concept album - "7 Days For A Life". Seven teams from seven different countries took part in the project. 
In mid-March 1992, the group celebrated its 20th anniversary. On this occasion, a special concert was held, where they also played well-known from the membership in the formation - Klemmetsrud and Frydenlund. In May the following year, the third longplay Kerrs Pink was released- "A Journey on the Inside". Soon after, the musicians decided to take a break. In January 1994, the formation was a duet - Harald Lytomt, Jostein Hansen. Session musicians were invited to work on the new material. In 1997, the fourth album - Art of Complex Simplicity - was released. After several promotional concerts, the following new formation formed - Harald Lytomt, Jostein Hansen, guitarist David Hansen, keyboardists - Freddy Ruud and Per Øyvind Nordberg, and drummers Knut R. Lie and Jonny Klemmetsrud and vocalist Benny Hanssen. Per soon left the formation, however, and Lasse Johansen was invited in his place. However, it was not the end of reshuffling - the beginning of the following year, two vocalists were led - Lasse Tanderø and collaborating with Steve Vai, among others. 
In 2002, the album Tidings was released, "which has closed the discography of Kerrs Pink so far. 
Over the next five years, the following formation was crystallized: Lasse Johansen, Benjamin Nordling, Harald Lytomt and Magne Johansen. It was the four of them that gave birth to the so-called Kerrs Pink Project, a side-event of musicians, created in January 2009. It was brought to life, because a lot of new material just does not fit in the style of the parent group, although of course it reminds it a bit. 
At the same time, there is the Kerrs Pink band - as such......~



Musicians: 
Vinyl version: 
- Harald Lytomt / guitars, flute 
- Jostein Hansen / bass, guitars, vocals 
- Halvard Haugerud / keyboards, bass, vocals 
- Tore Fundingsrud / drums 
- Trond Bøhn / keyboards, guitar contributed on two tracks before he quit. 
GUESTS: 
- Kirsten Hognestad Bøhn / vocals 
- Lars-Thore Lande / bass 
- Trygve Lahn / violin 
- Chris Dankel, family and friends (hand claps and chorus) 

CD version: 
- Harald Lytomt / guitars, flute 
- Jostein Hansen / bass, guitars, vocals 
- Tore Fundingsrud / drums 
- Per Øyvind Nordberg / Keyboards, chorus 
GUESTS: 
- Halvard Haugerud / lead vocals re-recorded 
- Tormod Gangfløt / viola 
- Tore Johansen / chorus 



Tracks: 
1. Mellom Oss / Between Us (5:36) 
2. Tröstevise / Comforting Tune (2:56) 
3. Tröstevals / Comforting Waltz(1:02) 
4. Östenfor Ord / East of Words (6:06) 
5. Hvem snakker til meg? / Who’s Speaking To Me (5:29) 
6. Elegi / Elegy (3:17) 
7. Mens Tiden Forgar / While Time Fades Away (17:17) 
a. Dråper / Drops 
b. Haven / The Garden 
c. Adams sang / Adam’s Song 
d. Fallet / The Fall 
e. Evas Sang / Eve’s Song 
f. Mens Tiden Forgår / While Time Fades Away 
g. Etterspill / Aftermath 
Bonus tracks: 
8. Marius / Marius (3:16) 
9. Parademarsj for Jubilanter / Parade March for Jubilants (1:40) 
10. Den Siste Russ / The Last of the Sixth Formers (2:36) 
11. Hyllest til Olga / Ode to Olga (3:00) 
12. Trömborg Samba / Trömborg Samba (3:27) 
13. Fredsmarsjen / Marche de la Paix (3:15) 

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Music

Music

sound

sound

Hi`s Master`s Voice

Hi`s Master`s Voice

Vinyl

Vinyl

music forever

music forever

“A Revolutionary New Triumph in Tape” 1958

“A Revolutionary New Triumph in Tape” 1958

vinyl

vinyl