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21 Aug 2016

The Vagrants “The Great Lost album” 1965-68 US Garage Psych with (Leslie West)















The Vagrants “The Great Lost album” 1965-68 US Garage Psych 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9x2F8i62IHM 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gCZY64-oDX8 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bPFZLz_c05o 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4C2-mgNQITQ 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0csucq0HfIw 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GkQLyRJItKg 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y171dIB4SFE 

The first group of legendary rocker Leslie West was formed in 1964 in Forest Hills (NY). ‘Rolling Stone’ quickly became famous in the mid-60s, playing processed in garage rock songs of the local charts. There they saw Felix Pappalardi, who at the time played in the “Cream” (there was also a producer of one of the singles “Rogue”). “The Vagrants” released a few singles, united later in the album “The Great Lost Album”. The band broke up in 1969. Pappalardi and West have joined forces and created a “ Mountain ”….. 

Biography: 
Most famous for featuring Leslie West on guitar in his pre-Mountain days, the Vagrants were extremely popular in their home base of Long Island, NY in the mid-'60s, and recorded some decent singles without approaching a national breakout. Like fellow New Yorkers the Rascals, the Vagrants prominently featured a Hammond organ, and often played soul-influenced rock. The Vagrants were far more guitar-based than the Rascals, however, as well as projecting a more garagey, less mature outlook; their later material lands somewhere between the Rascals and Vanilla Fudge. 
One of the few rock bands signed to the folkie Vanguard label, the Vagrants cut some fair singles between 1965 and 1968 that suffered from a lack of identity: a Zombie-ish number here, a punk stomper there, a soul-rock thing here. “I Can’t Make a Friend,” which shows up on some garage compilations, is the most well-known of their initial efforts, but the group took their closest swipe at stardom after Felix Pappalardi helped them sign to Atco. 
A rock version of Otis Redding’s “Respect” (which surfaced on the Nuggets compilation) was a hit in some Eastern regions, but couldn’t compete with Aretha Franklin’s rendition, also released in 1967. After a couple of other singles on Atco, the group broke up in late 1968, when West formed Mountain (which also included Pappalardi). Much of the Vagrants’ material was reissued in the mid-'90s. 
~ by Richie Unterberger (AMG). 
———————————————————————————- 
Review: 
Issued in 1987 and not available for too long, Arista’s The Great Lost Vagrants Album is not an actual lost Vagrants album, but a ten-track compilation combining both sides of their three 1967-68 Atco singles, their 1966 Vanguard single “I Can’t Make a Friend”/“Young Blues,” and two 1966 outtakes. Seven of the ten songs are also on the Southern Sound Vagrants LP compilation I Can’t Make a Friend, though that record’s missing three songs (the outtake “My Babe,” and the Atco B-sides “I Love, Love You (Yes I Do)” and “Beside the Sea”) from the Arista anthology. 
The Southern Sound comp might have the edge, as it has some tracks not on The Great Lost Vagrants Album, including both sides of the pre-Vanguard 45, one of which, “Oh Those Eyes,” is a cool garage rocker with a tune derived from “Walk Don’t Run”; the Vanguard B-side “Your Hasty Heart”; and a 13-minute unreleased version of “Satisfaction.” And neither of those LPs have been too easy to come by over the years. Got it all? That said, The Great Lost Vagrants Album really isn’t a very interesting album, despite its historical significance as the launching point for Leslie West. Other than “Respect” and “I Can’t Make a Friend,” it’s pretty average period 1966-68 fare without much of an identity, mixing varying loads of garage rock, soul, pop, and psychedelia. 
~ by Richie Unterberger (AMG). …. 

The Vagrants weren’t the only band to come out of Forest Hills High School, later there was another Queens-based combo you might have heard of… The Ramones. Johnny and Tommy Ramone attended Forest Hills High School at the same time as most of the Vagrants. (Joey, who was a few years younger, was there shortly afterwards.) 
In 1965 Johnny and Tommy were playing together in a short-lived band called the Tangerine Puppets. “I try not to talk about it 'cause it was bad!” Johnny told me when I interviewed him in 1995. He was much more interested in talking about the Vagrants. “First I knew Roger Mansour, who was the drummer, and me and him used to be friends. He used to call for me in the morning and we used to go to school together. He was a great drummer, and I’d hear from him how he was going to get into the Vagrants. 
Larry West-whose real name was Larry Weinstein, who was Leslie’s brother-he was the bass player. He’d be sitting there in the study hall 'cause he’d be on permanent suspension for having his hair too long. He’d be saying he was starting a band with his brother and how his brother’s a great guitar player. And I’d ask other kids in the school about if they knew the good guitar player, and they’d go, 'No, he’s just a fat kid. He’s no good.’ But Larry would always be saying how great his brother was. 
His brother was older, and he was just a dropout. Larry at this point was about 15,1 was about 16, and Leslie was about 18. Larry just sat there suspended the whole year 'cause all that mattered was the Vagrants and growing his hair-that was the important thing in his life. 
So they were starting, and as soon as I saw Leslie play I said, 'Wow, this guy’s great!’ He didn’t play like he played later on, but he was able to play whatever cover he was doing and do it exact, from Beatles stuff to 'You Really Got Me.’ Whatever he would figure out, he would play just like the record.” “We were close with the Ramones,” remembers Larry, “but I didn’t even know what they were doing. I didn’t even know they were starting a band.” At that point, they weren’t. After the Tangerine Puppets broke up it would be another nine years before Johnny picked up a guitar and formed the Ramones. “I would try and get into wherever I could [to see the Vagrants],” Johnny told me. “Sometimes you could get into certain clubs who wouldn’t get so heavy with the [ID] proofing. There’d be a place in the city. 
I saw them at the Manhattan Center, Action House on Long Island, places like that. I must’ve seen them dozens of times "They went through so many different evolutions throughout the band … Somewhere along the way they went away to Long Island to play some places, and that’s when they came back and we started hearing more about the Rascals and Vanilla Fudge. The Vagrants came back and they were different. They were into more like the Rascals-type thing with the songs slowed down and doing sort of a soul type of thing, like 'Mustang Sally’ type stuff. They were doing 'Good Lovin” stuff too. 
They kept doing covers of other people’s songs, but they would be better than the Rascals and better than the Vanilla Fudge at doing the stuff. They just looked better, and Leslie’s guitar playing was far superior to Gene Cornish of the Rascals or Vince Martell, the guitar player in the Vanilla Fudge.“ The band’s image and presentation made a big impression on Johnny. "The band looked so good,” he continued, “and Larry was becoming like a Jim Morrison … just like permanently fucked-up with the leather pants and the long, wavy hair … Leslie would become more and more flashy with the outfits he would be getting into. 
They’d just go through so many phases where everything would come in with the really loud colored clothes with these boas-these feathered things around him, y'know? Weird seeing some 350-pound guy looking like this!” “I only knew them then from the cafeteria in school,” admits Peter Sabatino. “I saw them sitting there, y'know. They were new on the scene. I guess, because of the ego, I didn’t pay a lot of attention to that, how upcoming they were. 
It’s only through your interview that I realized they were emulating us and we were idols to them. Like Larry and I used to wear these motorcycle jackets back then, and I guess they picked up on that. Whatever they thought was cool with the Vagrants; they took for themselves.” by Mike Stax ….. 

Issued in 1987 and not available for too long, Arista’s The Great Lost Vagrants Album is not an actual lost Vagrants album, but a ten-track compilation combining both sides of their three 1967-68 Atco singles, their 1966 Vanguard single “I Can’t Make a Friend”/“Young Blues,” and two 1966 outtakes. Seven of the ten songs are also on the Southern Sound Vagrants LP compilation I Can’t Make a Friend, though that record’s missing three songs (the outtake “My Babe,” and the Atco B-sides “I Love, Love You (Yes I Do)” and “Beside the Sea”) from the Arista anthology. The Southern Sound comp might have the edge, as it has some tracks not on The Great Lost Vagrants Album, including both sides of the pre-Vanguard 45, one of which, “Oh Those Eyes,” is a cool garage rocker with a tune derived from “Walk Don’t Run”; the Vanguard B-side “Your Hasty Heart”; and a 13-minute unreleased version of “Satisfaction.” And neither of those LPs have been too easy to come by over the years. Got it all? That said, The Great Lost Vagrants Album really isn’t a very interesting album, despite its historical significance as the launching point for Leslie West. Other than “Respect” and “I Can’t Make a Friend,” it’s pretty average period 1966-68 fare without much of an identity, mixing varying loads of garage rock, soul, pop, and psychedelia. by all music….. 

Interview with Johnny Ramone by Mike Stax 

(this interview is partial quotation from Ugly Things #14courtesy of Mike Stax ) 

MS: Well, everyone goes through their first bad bands! What other bands were in your school? There must’ve probably been several. 
JR: Yeah, I don’t remember their names ,but the main thing that was arotmd was the Vagrants, and they were in Forest Hills. First I knew Roger Mansour, who was the drum- mer, and me and him used to be friends. He used to call for me in the morning and we used to go to school together. He was a great drummer, and I’d hear from him how he was going to get into the Vagrants. And Larry West-who was Larry Weinstein, who was Leslie’s brother-he was the bass player. He’d be sitting there in the study hall 'cos he’d be on permanent suspension for having his hair too long. He’d be saying he was starting a band with his brother and how his brother’s a great guitar player. And I’d ask other kids in the school about if they knew the good guitar player, and they’d go, “No, he’s just a fat kid. He’s no good.” But Larry would always be saying how great his brother was. His brother was older, and he was just a dropout. Larry at this point was about 15, I was about 16, and Leslie was about 18. Larry just sat there suspended the whole year 'cos all that mattered was the Vagrants and growing his hair–that was the important thing in his life. So they were starting, and as soon as I saw Leslie play I said, “Wow, this guy’s great!” He didn’t play like he played later on, but he was able to play whatever cover he was doing and do it exact-from Beatles stuff to “You Reany Got Me.” 'Whatever he would figure out, he would play just like the record. 
UT: So this is well before they released any sin- 
gles, right? 
JR: I think the first one, “I Can’t Make A Friend,” came out January '66, so this has gotta be in '65. 
UT: So at this point were they kinda different from their records? Because they became more like a Young Rascals-type soul band. 
JR: They went through so many different evolutions throughout the band. They would start out as 
a straight cover band–doing very straight covers from Beatles to Rolling Stones. Leslie would get to 
sing one song, “Roll Over Beethoven,” and they would switch off on the vocals between Larry and Pete Sabatino, who was the singer. 
UT: Did they have an organ all the time? 
JR: Yeah, they had the organ, but it would just be a portable one at that point-a Farfisa. And that 
eventually tuned into a Hammond. Somewhere along the way they went away to Long Island to play some places, and that’s when they came back and we started hearing more about the Rascals and Vanilla Fudge. The Vagrants came back and they were different. They were into more like the Rascals- type thing with the songs slowed down and doing sort of a soul type of thing-like “Mustang Sally” type stuff. They were doing “Good Lovin"I and stuff too. They kept doing covers of other people’s songs, but they would be better than the Rascals and better than the Vanilla Fudge at doing the stuff. They just looked better, and Leslie’s guitar playing was far superior to Gene Comish of the Rascals or Vince Martell, the guitar player in the Vanilla Fudge. Larry West was really becoming a star at that point. It was weird, 'cos they would play, I think, 
the Rolling Stone Club in the city, and they played there for six straight months, like five, six nights aweek. 

UT: What kind of places would you usually seethem play? 
JR: I would try and get into wherever I could.Sometimes you could get into certain clubs who wouldn’t get so heavy with the proofing. There’d be a place in the city. I saw them at the Manhattan Center, Action House on Long Island-places like that. I must’ve seen them dozens of times. 
UT: Generally at these shows would it be a bill with several bands? 
JR: No, later on it got that way. Probably around '67 you’d go to shows a lot at the Fillmore, and the Fillmore would have these multiple group shows, and the Vagrants would get onto shows like that, probably lower down the bill. I remember going to a WMCA Good Guys show here in the city which had a whole bunch of acts. Everybody would come on and play like three songs, and the Vagrants had a fairly good bill on that. The 
Cream were on it, the Who were on it, and Mitch Ryder-when he went sok-was the headliner. 
UT: That must’ve been a phenomenal show! How did the Vagrants match up to those other acts? 
JR: Oh, I thought they matched up. I didn’t see no problem, y'know? (laughs) The band looked so good, and Larry was becoming like a Jim Morrison. (laughs) It’s hard to imagine, but he must have been 
modelling himselft after Jim Morrison at that point-just like permanently fucked-up with the 
leather pants and the long, wavy hair. 
UT.. What was their stage act like? Would there be a lot of movement? JR: Yeah, a lot of movement. Leslie would be-come more and more flashy with the outfits he would be getting into. They’d just go through so 
many phases where everything would come in with the really loud coloured clothes with these 
boas-these feathered things around him, y'know? Weird seeing some 350-pound guy looking like this. 
y'know? (laughter) 
UT: Were you like part of a Vagrants "following” that would go to all their shows? 
JR: I was a fan like everybody was a fan. I would not be bothered talkin’ to people. I would just go with my friends and watch the show. I would be going to all concerts, I’d be trying to see all the concerts I could. I saw the Stones like five times with Brian Jones; I’ve seen the Who ten times; the Doors probably seven, eight times. Every band. I don’t know if there’s anybody I didn’t see. 

members
Leslie West - guitars, vocals 
Larry West - bass, vocals 
Peter Sabatino - vocals, percussions 
Jerry Storch - keyboards, vocals 
Roger Monsour - drums 

trackls: 
01. Respect (1967) - 2:13 
02. I Can not Make A Friend (1967) - 2:13 
03. Beside The Sea (1967) - 2:16 
04. I Do not Need Your Loving (1967) - 2:52 
05. Young Blues (1966) - 2:13 
06. And When It’s Over (1967) - 2:14 
07. A Sunny Summer Rain (1967) - 2:49 
08. The Final Hour (1966) - 2:23 
09. My Babe (1966) - 2:56 
10. I Love, Love You (Yes I Do) (1967) - 2:38 
11. Oh Those Eyes (1965) - 2:33 
12. You’re Too Young (1965) - 2:02 
13. Your Hasty Heart (1966) - 2:37 
14. Satisfaction (1968) - 12:42 

johnkatsmc5, welcome music..