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12 Aug 2016

Zior “Zior” 1971 UK heavy psych











Zior “Zior” 1971 UK heavy psych

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An obscure progressive/heavy rock group whose debut album has few memorable moments but has become quite collectable because of the label it’s on. The vocals are poor, the composition’s weak and the playing is ponderous. The pick of a poor batch are I Really Do, Za Za Za Zilda (also released as a 45), Love’s Desire and Oh Mariya, but all four were in a similar, rather flat, heavy rock style.
The See For Miles album reissue includes five previously unreleased tracks from a second projected album which never saw daylight. The best of these was Strange Kind Of Magic, which had a good voodoo beat and some distorted guitar. Overall, they were stronger than the material on the original album. Cat’s Eyes had some decent heavy rock guitar riffs. The CD featured three additional tracks to the album but I can only really recommend this to Zior and Black Sabbath fans.
Zior had their roots in Southend’s early sixties R&B scene. Kevin Bonsor had previously been in a local R&B outfit, The Essex Five, and then classical/rock fusion outfit, Cardboard Orchestra. Pete Brewer had been in another Southend R&B band, The Night Riders. He and Bonsor were Zior’s founding members recruiting Truba and Skeels (who’d once played in a London band called The Bum) via a ‘Melody Maker’ advert.
Zior did have a reputation as a wild live band. They were heavily into Black Magic and Satanic Mass etc. They recorded an album on the Beacon label, later in 1971, which was credited to Monument, though in fact it featured all four members of Zior…..

Tapestry of Delights, last.fm)

Zior had their roots in Southend’s early sixties R&B scene. Kevin Bonsor had previously been in a local R&B outfit, The Essex Five, and then classical/rock fusion outfit, Cardboard Orchestra. Pete Brewer had been in another Southend R&B band, The Night Riders. He and Bonsor were Zior’s founding members recruiting Truba and Skeels via a Melody Makeradvert.

Though an obscure heavy rock group, Zior’s 1971 debut album got immediate attention when it was released because the band used the same artist that Black Sabbath had used on their first album. The band obviously had a huge fascination with the occult and expressed this often in thier songs (and mostly in their stage show).

The album is pretty much bluesy and proggy hard rock. There are some cool (fairly) fuzzy riffs. At times the music has a tribal-like rhythm to their sound, very psychedelic and 70s.

“Love’s Desire” is the highlight of the album. It has a cool, catchy riff (plus some hand claps), and it also has the most memorable chorus of the album. ….

Zior, hailing from England’s Southend, was formed in the late '60s by a quartet of local R&B scene veterans. They were a popular local live act in their day, not surprising considering their wild stage shows and satanically themed set props. Legend has it that unlike the more coy Black Sabbath, Ziorwere serious practitioners of the black arts, for all the good it did their career. The band never did break through, and this, their 1971 self-titled debut, remains their sole recording. Apparently the Devil never told them that R&B was finished in the U.K., or perhaps he did, but damned them to keep on playing it regardless. Of course, the group members weren’t total idiots, and they did take a few stabs at the new genre, à la Cream, Sabbath, and occasionally even ELP, but the heaviness of the genre was beyond them, and the result is quite pathetic. So instead of thick slabs of the heavy metal one expected, listeners were instead treated to some limping bandwagon-jumping. They were one hell of an R&B group, though, and on those numbers, of which there are many here, they absolutely shine. But whoever heard of or wanted a Satanic Brit beat band, least of all in 1971? Damned to obscurity and doomed from the get-go, Zior were totally out of time; the Devil has a lot to answer for. by allmusic…

Zior’s 1971 debut album got immediate attention when it was released because the band used the same artist that Black Sabbath had used on their first album (an artist called Keef). This first album is a knockout of fantastic heavy rock and is still one of my favourite albums of that year.Zior had their roots in Southend’s early sixties R&B scene. Kevin Bonsor had previously been in a local R&B outfit, The Essex Five, and then classical/rock fusion outfit, Cardboard Orchestra. Pete Brewer had been in another Southend R&B band, The Night Riders. He and Bonsor were Zior’s founding members recruiting Truba and Skeels (who’d once played in a London band called The Bum) via a 'Melody Maker’ advert.Zior did have a reputation as a wild live band. They were heavily into Black Magic and Satanic Masses etc. They recorded an album on the Beacon label, later in 1971, which was credited to Monument, though in fact it featured all four members of Zior. …..

Personnel:
Keith Bonsor - Vocals, Keyboards, Bass, Flute
Peter Brewer - Drums, Piano, Harmonica
Barry Skeels - Bass, Vocals
John Truba - Guitar, Vocals

Discography:

Monument - The First Monument (1971)
Zior (1971)
Every Inch A Man (1972)

Тracklist:1. I Really Do2. Za Za Za Zilda3. Love’s Desire 4:004. New Land5. Now I’m Sad6. Give Me Love7. Quabala8. Oh Mariya9. Your Life Will Burn10. I Was Fooling11. Before My Eyes Go Blind12. Rolling ThunderBonus tracks:13. Dudi Judy14. Evolution15. Cat’s Eyes16. Strange Kind Of Magic17. Ride Me Baby18. Entrance Of The Devil19. Every Inch A Man20. Angle Of The Highway

johnkatsmc5, welcome music..

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