Sunday, 18 September 2016

Black Sugar “Black Sugar “1971 + “Black Sugar II” 1974 Peruvian Latin Funk


Black Sugar “ Black Sugar “1971 + “Black Sugar II” 1974 Peruvian Latin Funk
Black Sugar “Black Sugar” 1971 first album  
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Black Sugar  “Black Sugar II"  second album
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Black Sugar “Black Sugar” 1971 ultra rare Peruvian Latin Funk Rock  first album  recommended….!

This is a great LP by Black Sugar from Peru, released in 1971, it’s a nice mix of funk, latin, jazz, soul and some funky guitars. Dig the groove! ……… 

Black Sugar, the brainchild of Victor “Coco” Salazar and Miguel “Chino” Figueroa, was formed in 1969 under the name Los Far Fen, mainly because the group had a Farfisa and a Fender amplifiers as their only electronic amplification equipment. 
In 1970 the group was given the name of Black Sugar by Jaime Delgado Aparicio, a jazz piano player and arranger that at the time was the artistic director of Sono Radio, a Peruvian label. 
Delgado Aparicio, recognizing the talent of the young musicians, gave the group an opportunity to record a long play in 1971. Original compositions like “Too Late”, “Viajecito” and “The Looser” made this LP an immediate best seller. Black Sugar “Black Sugar” was sold in all South America and there was a release of the LP in USA by a Miami based label. 
The success of Black Sugar was not due to luck or marketing.Their members were some of the finest , if not the best, young musician from Peru. The arranger, “Coco” Salazar was also a fantastic guitar player; Miguel “Chino” Figueroa was the composer of almost all the original songs by Black Sugar, besides playing keyboards, he was also an inspired organ player; Jose Cruz was one of the most promising young jazz drummers; it is hard not to mention the rest of the musicians, players like Roberto Valdez, Luis Calixto, Antonio Ginocchio, etc… deserve an extensive description of their abilities. ….. ~

Black Sugar is a funky Latin-rock band from Peru, mercifully reissued for a latter-day audience by Lazarus Audio Products. “Viajecito” is the essential track – the waka-waka guitar intro is the main attraction, although the basic track is funky, Latin, and mostly instrumental. “The Looser” and “Funky Man” also are hip, but lyrics on the corny side keep them from heavy play. The lead-in tracks on each side, “Too Late” and “Understanding,” are solid, and the rest are decent ballads. Although the singing is not the greatest, the acoustic guitar and conga interplay on the lighter tracks sound like something from Sabu Martinez’ Groovin’ with Sabu album. “Pussy Cat” is an ambitious jazz instrumental; with its Latin percussion, funky bass, and strings (not to mention the title), it could have been a cut from one of the better “blaxploitation” soundtracks. Black Sugar may not change many lives, but it does occupy a vital corner in the rare world of Latin funk…by allmusic… ~

Tracklist 
A1 Too Late 3:00 
A2 Viajecito 5:42 
A3 The Looser 4:10 
A4 This Time 4:21 
A5 Funky Man 2:03 
B1 Understanding 5:06 
B2 When You'r Walking 4:53 
B3 When I Needed Someone 2:42 
B4 Pussy Cat 4:54 









Story
The two acetatos that Black Sugar left us in the 70s, Black Sugar (1971) and Black Sugar II (1974), and that made it the pioneer of Latin funk, bring us back to those Peruvian nights of three decades ago: hot nights where his music played for hours that felt infinite for its flavor. Now that the group is playing their classical songs again in concert, a tasty time machine is made available that must be taken advantage of. What better pretext to try to reconstruct his story here. 
Black Sugar dominated the sound of Lima, the Peruvian capital, in the decade mentioned. An era marked by a military government that, after assuming power in 1968, brought with it, among many other consequences, the debacle of the first generation of Peruvian rock. With his repressive machinery he was in charge of discouraging everything that inclined towards the foreign, more precisely to the gringo. “The rock bands did not like the military, then the bands of the moment began to disappear, as was the case with Laghonia, Traffic Sound or the Mads, giving way to another type of music,” says Pacho Mejía, vocalist of Black Sugar. I think that precisely there was one of the keys to the success they had in those times: their Latin touch was the safe conduct for their survival in this hostile and repressive context
The roots of this band are in a group called Los Far-Fen (in reference to the musical communion between the Farfisa organ and the Fender guitar), formed at the end of the seventies by the guitarist Víctor “Coco” Salazar, with the aim of animating parties. “The Far-Fen seemed to me a sophisticated group. They made Latin music, but fine: Tito Puente, Ray Barreto, and also American romantic music and jazz. One good night, spontaneous, I went up to sing with them, and "Coco” loved the tone of my voice. He told me: let’s form a band, “continues Pacho. Thus, inspired by the sound of the first Chicago and Santana, and then the Californian Tower of Power, they began to develop a style that proved to have unusual success in the dances of the time, circa 1971. 
The breaking point of this stage as party entertainers occurred when his music reached the ears of Jaime Delgado Aparicio, perhaps one of the most transcendental musicians in contemporary Peruvian history of which little is known, and who sadly died at age 40 in 1982. At that time, the beginning of the seventies, the then young but already renowned Peruvian musician graduated from the Berklee school in Boston, had arrived in Lima after a season of music in Italy and was the manager of Sono Radio, one of the most important record companies in the country. It is Delgado Aparicio who proposes to abandon the repertoire of parties and record an LP with original material. There was born the sound of the group.
Re-named as Black Sugar and sponsored by Delgado Aparicio, they made their own for a season the recording studio owned by the label. As the trumpeter Antonio Ginocchio recalls, the other original member who has returned to the court: "The studio was gigantic, about the size of a soccer field [laughs]. I was prepared to record a big band, with modular rails, a console with 36 channels … and since Jaime was the manager, we had all the hours we wanted. We never got tired, we had about 20 years. ”
The first self-titled LP is officially released in 1971, and if one reviews now the Peruvian edition of that time, it is surprising to read the credits written in English: apparently, the look was outward. Pacho Mejía corroborates this deduction: “It is in English because we had a lot of contact with the US. There was the vision of reaching the North American market. The song "Too late” came to be in seventh place in the charts in Miami, in the list of songs most listened to “. At that time, indeed, the musicians received an offer to record the next album there. 

Ginocchio continues: "But Jaime wanted to make some changes to the band, we were not going to travel all of them. He had his ideas, put some choristers … But the issue was that we had a lot of work here. And when they told us to travel, we thought, what are we going to do there? We did not want to go and we did not go. ” Therefore, that international recording was never made. 

The main argument is that they had a lot of work here, a situation that is hard to abandon. “We had solvency. When we played in the new year, we sent ourselves to make full costumes, even shoes, "recalls Antonio. And then there is Pacho, who swears he does not exaggerate: "In December we played so many times that, on one occasion, in 1972, I went directly to buy a car.”
However, it is hard not to think that this was a missed opportunity for what could be the significance of Black Sugar in a major market outside of Peru. Soon after, in 1976, problems began with the departure of Hermes Landa, manager of the group since its inception and perhaps the main responsible for its commercial success. In fact, it was the brain of the profitable logistics in which the group was held. 
Added to this, the curfew imposed by the military regime at that time caused the contracts to begin to diminish substantively, and the original members began to abandon the ship. “The same Jaime Delgado Aparicio lost interest,” says Antonio, “also, as we did not want to go to the trip, he forgot the matter.” And so, before the decade ended, the group no longer existed. 
Since then Black Sugar became an unwritten legend, until the year 2010, “Pacho” Mejía and Antonio Ginocchio made the decision to play together again after several meetings with the other members in which, motivated by nostalgia, old friends were healthy and swore that soon they would come together to rehearse again.
This new project by Pacho y Antonio, baptized as Blue Rhodes, had a varied repertoire that occasionally passed through songs by Black Sugar, such as “Too late” or “Checan”, and in which a different sensation flooded the atmosphere: the audience He recognized and asked for more. So finally decided and called the original members available, including the trombonist Lucho Calixto, and completed the other lines with young musicians. 
Since then, Black Sugar has returned to the search for new audiences, with the impetus of young people and the experience of the historical. With the voice of Pacho Mejía, now remember that we closed the conversation, invaded by nostalgia: “At that time, the most radical rockers had us a little” between their eyes “: Black Sugar was not a group neither rocker nor salsa … there was something of rock, salsa, jazz. That’s why in the history of rock we are not valued like others. But the fact that young people now listen to us avidly, and dance our songs, is something that fills us with satisfaction. ” 
Thus, despite the absence of “Coco” Salazar and keyboardist Miguel “Chino” Figueroa, formerly pillars of the group, the new ensemble began to take hold a couple of years ago, when the new formation was noticed in the scene Lima, arriving to record a few months ago a special for paid TV…..noisey…~ 



Black Sugar ‎ "Black Sugar II” 1974 second album

Tracklist 
1 Fuego 5:40 
2 Valdez In The Country 4:38 
3 Don’t You Worry About A Thing 2:51 
4 The Dawn Of My Madness 2:33 
5 I Want To Believe 3:18 
6 Checan 5:10 
7 Kathy 4:49 
8 All Your Love 3:45 
9 Wake Up 3:30 










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