Tuesday, 27 September 2016

Bombino “Azel” 2016 Nigeria Desert Blues, Folk, World,Folk Fusion,Ethno


Bombino “Azel” 2016 Nigeria Desert Blues, Folk, World,Folk Fusion,Ethno, ….recommended..
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The contemporary music of Taureg is impossible to separate from the historic and political struggles of the people who not only made the songs, but those it was made for. Bombino, one of Taureg’s more recent acts to attract international recognition, has experienced this first hand, witnessing the Niger government’s 2007 attempt to outlaw music (and the guitar in particular) to quash any chance of rebellion along with the execution of fellow musicians.

Yet Bombino never turned his back on the instrument that gave his people hope and as a result terrified a government. This rebellious spirit has been consistent throughout his music with his lyrics directly addressing the struggle of his people. Much like the music of fellow Taureg band Tinariwen, Bombino’s music draws heavily from traditional Taureg music styles with call-and-response vocals and handclaps incorporated into the percussion to exemplify the sense of community and belonging that the music evokes. Bombino once remarked that he didn’t see the guitar as a weapon, but rather a tool to uplift a community and build a better future.

Perhaps this is why, despite the struggles of the Taureg people’s past, there is a jubilant optimism to Bombino’s music. His style of playing - which he dubs “Taureggae” - brings an infectious, danceable groove that seems to be as much influenced by funk as it is by western rock acts like Jimi Hendrix. This, combined by the percussive thrust of the music makes something that begs the listener to move, to get up and free themselves. Three albums in, and several world tours under his belt, Bombino’s music remains as powerful and vital as the day he first picked up a guitar…..by Robert Whitfield ……


After a 'brief' 25 hour delay in Morocco on his way from Niger, Bombino arrived in Woodstock, New York to record his new album at Applehead Studio with Dave Longstreth (Dirty Projectors). Applehead is a beautiful studio in a converted barn on farmland where goats, pigs, and other animals roam freely. The band stayed in a guest house a few steps away from the studio, and took turns making meals. Apart from a morning invasion of the guesthouse by a 700-pound pig, Applehead was the perfect atmosphere for Bombino and his group to create new music over the course of the 10 days they had there. Longstreth, meanwhile, proved to be a fantastic match for Bombino as this album’s producer. He has a deep respect for the Saharan music tradition and guided their sessions with a gentle but skilled hand. Fans of Bombino and Tuareg music in general will notice a few remarkable innovations on this album. The first is the introduction of a new style Bombino is pioneering that he affectionally calls 'Tuareggae' - a sunny blend of Tuareg blues/rock with reggae one-drop and bounce. Another is the first-ever use of Western vocal harmonies in recorded Tuareg music, (due to Longstreth's influence) which give the songs new depth and color. Finally, the band behind him is tighter and more energetic than ever before. The result is Bombino's best, most well-rounded, and groundbreaking album to date: Azel. The word "Azel" has three meanings in Bombino's native Tamasheq language - first, it is the name of a small desert town just a few kilometers from where he grew up, in Agadez, Niger. His wife's family is from Azel, and it is the site of the first and only Tuareg school in the country. Bombino has long held aspirations of developing a Tuareg community center and arts school in Agadez, so the town of Azel holds a special place in his heart. Second, the word azel means the roots or stems of a tree. This album is a reflection of Bombino's unique place in Tuareg music where he at once honors the traditional roots of the music while also taking it into brand new territory, hence the roots and the stems. Finally, the word azel is also slang in Tamasheq, loosely the equivalent of 'That's my jam!' in American English. The significance of that meaning should be instantly obvious to anyone who listens to this album. 

Produced by Dirty Projectors leader Dave Longstreth, the virtuosic Saharan guitarist Bombino’s latest album features a sublime iteration of desert blues that’s both authentic and ambitious.
While interviewing Dirty Projectors for a profile in 2009—on the cusp of the release of Bitte Orca and their Malian guitar-meets-Mariah hit “Stillness Is the Move”—band leader Dave Longstreth enthused over a Saharan guitarist on the Sublime Frequencies label who went by the nameBombino. In the last six years, the Tuareg artist has continued to make inroads in the West, touring and recording Stateside, and his 2013 album Nomad found him in the studio with the Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach. And now, Longstreth’s early admiration has come full circle, as he was tapped to record Bombino’s latest, Azel, in upstate New York. The resulting record presents the guitarist in a lucid, unadorned light. There’s no need to add too much to Bombino’s desert blues—his unassuming and astonishing playing speaks volumes on its own. Seeing him live, his left hand is deceptively fast, flicking off the strings and lighting upon extra notes that other players can’t quite hit. Much like fellow Tichumaren players Tinariwen, Bombino’s acumen blends techniques derived from ngoni (a traditional lute), the imzad (a one-stringed bow instrument), and the amplified guitar of Hendrix and Santana.Azel isn’t so different from his unofficial first album for Sublime Frequencies, 2009’s Guitars From Agadez Vol. 2, which was recorded in his home country of Niger and intimate enough to capture the sounds of camels on one side and ragged stomping on the other. His gentleness comes through on “Igmayagh Dum (My Lover),” built from handclaps, thumped guitar body, and a nimble melody, with Bombino’s lines of love—sung in Tamasheq—delivered in a gentle purr. Meanwhile, his electric guitar prickles and the drums careen on “Timidiwa (Friendship).” There is one new wrinkle, though: a kind of fusion with reggae. That might sound corny on paper, but Bombino and his group keep it all low-key, and the sounds soon assimilate. Album centerpiece “Iyat Ninhay / Jaguar (A Great Desert I Saw)” is driven by a lilting bassline that leads into an incandescent solo from Bombino as trilling zaghrouta voices punctuate the ecstasy of the moment.But for all the guitar pyrotechnics, Western production, and reggae infusions, Azel never sounds like anything other than a sublime iteration of desert blues. Bombino has not pivoted towards Western music, as he still sings about the issues of his homeland in his native tongue. Hushed closer “Naqqim Dagh Timshar (We Are Left in This Abandoned Place)” tells of the plight of his people with a lines that translate to: “We sit in an abandoned place/ Everyone has left us/ The world has evolved/ And we’ve been abandoned.” Even with Bombino increasingly gaining exposure in America, lyrics like those remind us that his music continually speaks for those that would otherwise be unheard back home…..by  Pitchfork…..


This is Bombino's best album yet. He has had a lot of buzz around him-- or at least, as much buzz as one can for "world" music, but his releases so far have been just short of great. Very good, but not quite great. This one is great. 

Tuareg style guitar music should appeal generally to fans of the late-great Ali Farka Toure, but where Tinariwen tends to sound a bit too busy for me, Bombino just gets it right. On "Guitars from Agadez: Vol. 2," it was basically a field recording. Awesome for what it is, but Bombino deserves a proper showcase. "Agadez" gave him better production, but was a bit heavy on the drone style. "Nomad" was overproduced, as far as I was concerned. 

Here's the goldilocks Bombino album. Well-produced, but still free-wheeling. Some electric, some acoustic. Some scorching riffs, some rock influences, some blues influences, some reggae influences, and the general aesthetic of a more Arabic-sounding Ali Farka Toure. If that's your thing, Bombino's "Azel" delivers. This is the one I've been waiting for. Is he some sort of Saharan Hendrix, as some have said? No. Nonsense. Those kinds of comparisons are ridiculous, and frankly, Hendrix was no Bola Sete, to make an even sillier comparison. Enough of that nonsense. Bombino rocks. This album is great. Get it. 

At this point, Bombino — a.k.a. Omara Moctar, a Tuareg guitarist and singer-songwriter from northern Niger — is an old hand on the international scene. It was more than a decade ago that cassettes of his music circulated in the Tuareg communities clustered around the Sahara Desert. Ten years ago, he traveled to the U.S. to record a session (with The Rolling Stones’ Keith Richards and Charlie Watts, no less) and then start touring these shores as a sideman with a Tuareg band. But his career in the U.S. and Europe as a solo artist has been in full force for a while now; it was five years ago that NPR Music presented him in a full concert from New York’s (Le) Poisson Rouge.

Over that time, Bombino has more than found his groove, perfectly balanced between mastery and ease. Out of a well-documented generation of talented Tuareg rockers, he’s emerged as the most virtuosic and melodically innovative, as he’s layered his voice over sparkling guitar riffs. He hasn’t uprooted himself: He continues to sing in his native Tamashek about Tuareg issues, and in his tunes you can still hear the feedback loop between West African sounds and music of the Americas, from rock, blues and R&B to Caribbean dancehall and reggae.

But he’s also found room for experimentation over the course of three studio albums, from his first solo project, 2011’s Agadez, to the buzzed-out garage vibe of 2013’s Nomad, produced by Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys. Now comes Azel, with Dave Longstreth of Dirty Projectors as producer; according to Bombino, Longstreth let him take the sonic lead, which was apparently not so much the case with Auerbach.

On Azel, the details of Bombino’s extraordinary guitar playing come back into sharp focus — and that’s this album’s greatest pleasure, track to track. Other experiments emerge, too: Bombino and Longstreth intercut the loping rhythms of Tamashek tradition with the one-drop of reggae in “Timtar” (Memories). (Lest that seem strange: Bob Marley has been as much a hero among generations of Tuareg musicians as Jimi Hendrix, Bob Dylan and Dire Straits.)

But it’s in songs like the lilting “Naqqim Dagh Timshar” (We Are Left In This Abandoned Place) that Bombino’s artistry is on its brightest display. (Having spent a bit of time in the Sahara with Tuareg musicians from across their diaspora, I can say that that sort of slow burn feels exactly right.) The guitar is front-and-center. Bombino sings with passion, in that signature honey-and-sand voice, about the currents of Tuareg identity and politics, as well as his people’s precarious position at this very moment: “Everyone has left us / The world has evolved / And we’ve been abandoned,” he sings. “The whole world has evolved / Why haven’t we?”

Bombino may be prodding others there, because no one can say that he’s content to rest with his prodigious gifts. Musically, he’s always moving on to some new destination….by Anastasia Tsioulcas…..



Azel is the second studio album recorded in the West by Tuareg Ifoghas guitarist, singer, and songwriter Bombino (Omara Moctar) and fifth overall. It stands in sharp contrast to 2013's Nomad, produced by Dan Auerbach. The earlier album placed Bombino's signature playing style -- directly descended from the Niger master Haja Bebe and informed by Jimi Hendrix and Mark Knopfler -- inside a mélange of lap steel guitar, vibes, and a less syncopated rhythmic framework. While the songs and jams were unmistakably Bombino's, the sound and arrangements reflected the producer as much as the artist. Azel was produced by the Dirty Projectors' Dave Longstreth, a hardcore fan. Recorded in a converted barn in Woodstock, New York, this set delivers the full range of Bombino's gifts as composer, singer, and guitarist. The only Longstreth signature is the bright, canny mix. Bombino's double-tracked guitar is framed by a crack rhythm section. But more than this, the richness in his singing voice, with all its timbral and textural gradations, is accompanied by a female voice in the soulful instrument of Mama "Mahassa" Walet Amoumine. "Akhar Zaman" kicks the set off with the stinging razor tone of Bombino's electric guitar. The syncopated refrains and celebratory circular verses are pushed and pulled between popping tom-toms and punchy basslines as the guitarist fills and punctuates the sung lines. "Iwaranagh" begins in a midtempo Saharan drone as the singer dialogues with himself. Before the first minute ends, desert blues collide with what Bombino calls "Tuareggae." The effect is electrifying, with his guitars aided by a soaring B-3 and the rhythm section moving back and forth between Caribbean rocksteady and Niger blues grooves. The single "Timtar," with its slinky Saharan folk melody, is framed by a dubwise bassline, chunky guitar, and pulsing chords. Bombino also displays his heavy side with the blowout "Iyat Ninhay/Jaguar." This is Saharan rock on stun. The snare is mixed on top of a bluesy hard rock vamp born from a Sahel folk-inspired call-and-response lyric. The drive in Bombino's electric style is appended and multiplied in his acoustic music. The longing expressed on "Igmayagh Dum," the grief and militant solidarity on "Ashuhada," and the desolate loneliness in the closing "Naqqim Dagh Timshar" (We Are Left in This Abandoned Place) are devastatingly beautiful. As a man exiled twice due to political oppression in his homeland, his expression is emotional because it is experiential. Azel is essential, not just for Bombino's growing legion of fans or even those of music from the Sahara region. It is a remarkable example of 21st century popular music. It embraces and intertwines the history of various traditions, from West African folk to blues and rock to reggae -- and expands the reach of them all.... by Thom Jurek...allmusic.... 

Back in 2013 this publication tagged Tuareg guitarist Omara “Bombino” Moctar’s eponymous group’s Dan Auerbach-produced album Nomad (Nonesuch) as one of the year’s best (in our annual best albums roundup), additionally noting how, on tour that year as Robert Plant’s opening act, “the North African group really showed American crowds what so-called ‘trance music’ was all about. No less so than on this major label release, a mesmerizing collection of moods and grooves.” Since then, Bombino has moved over to indie label Partisan (presumably because it can devote more time and attention than Nonesuch, which is constantly juggling the demands of much larger artists), and it’s also lined up with Dirty Projectors frontman Dave Longstreth for production duties. In the process, Moctar & Co. serve up grooves so deep and seamless, melodies so rich and haunting, that the songwriter sounds more like a wizened delta bluesman with decades of experience rather than a relatively young man in his mid-thirties.
Azel (the name of a village, incidentally) starts off luminously via the waltzlike “Akhar Zaman” (“This Moment”), with Moctar unleashing spirals of upper-neck notes that are almost Hendrixian in tone, the band convulsing percussively behind him with glee. Later, on “Iyat Ninhay/Jaguar” (“A Great Desert I Saw”), amid a more straightforward blues-rock arrangement, that glee turns purposeful, the aforementioned grooves mirroring the lyrics’ theme, about the nomadic Tuareg existence of trudging through the African desert. Moctar sings in his native tongue—the English translation is provided in the booklet—and at one point he’s joined by wild backing vocal shrieks, almost as if the travelers had been beset by bandits or warriors.
As with the current crop of Fela Kuti-worshiping Afro-beat rockers, not to mention Bombino’s Tuareg countrymen Tinariwen, this group’s appreciation of and instinct for deep-groove sounds—here, American delta blues play as big a role as anything else —is profound. Not since Ali Farka Touré stormed the record bins back in the ‘90s has there been an African artist quite so gifted as Moctar. Memo to my fellow Americans: if your idea of African music is Paul Simon playing out his colonial lord fantasies amid a bunch of syrupy melody and chipper rhythms, well… this note’s for you. And there are some surprises awaiting....by Fred Mills....~


Patriotism may be the last refuge of scoundrels, but musical censorship runs close behind. Be it plantation owners confiscating the drums of African-American slaves, or Nazi propaganda snuffing out Yankee jazz degeneracy, musical expression remains a favorite soft target for dictators and reactionaries alike. And while failed attempts by the Taliban to ban all musical instruments from Afghan society have grabbed headlines, a more recent act of overt musical aggression came via the government of Niger’s desperate decree banning guitars among the nomadic Tuareg people of the Sahara, ostensibly to tamp down an ongoing insurgency/rebellion within Mali and Niger. The guitar ban proved a dismal failure — if anything, the instrument has assumed greater centrality within contemporary Tuareg culture. 

Unsurprisingly, American and Eurozone fans have been receptive to the circular licks and percussive syncopation of what’s lazily referred to as “desert blues” (the practitioners prefer “tishoumaren”), as guitar-dominated Tuareg ensembles Tamikrest and Terakaft have followed the lead of grandaddy outfit Tinariwen. Expanding their audience far beyond the Sahel, these bands have turned a unique mélange of Chaabi protest, Algerian Raï, Western rock, and ancient Berber folk tunes into music for small ensembles dominated by intricate riff-work, a technique first perfected by Tinariwen guitarist Ibrahim Ag Alhabib in the late 1970s. And Ag Alhabib has no finer pupil than Omara Moctar, a.k.a. Bombino, perhaps the region’s most accomplished virtuoso and the biggest Dire Straits fan in all the Sahara.A six-string prodigy along the lines of fellow polymath Taj Mahal, Bombino supplemented lessons learned at the feet of mentor (and fellow renowned guitarist in his own right) Haja Bebe with close studies of old Jimi Hendrix and Carlos Santana footage. Some of those rock moves have made their way into his arsenal, but Bombino isn’t a shredder in the clichéd guitar-hero mode — his fluid technique and improvisational gifts are marked by restraint, epitomized by the convent-pure tones of “I Greet My Country,” a mellifluous track from his third album, 2011’s beauteous Agadez, that brings to mind the sweet electric shivers of Sonny Sharrock’s Guitar-opening “Blind Willie.” Bombino’s altogether more raucous follow-up, 2013’s Nomad, paired him with Black Keys guitarist Dan Auerbach as producer, upping the blues-rock ante courtesy of a German drummer and a mix dusted with such Western exotica as vibes and pedal steel — hardly traditional, and no less enjoyable for that. 

Those who fret over the dangers of cross-pollination won’t necessarily be soothed by Bombino’s fifth album, Azel, which should delight the rest of us non-purists. Producer and Dirty Projector Dave Longstreth leaves extraneous instrumentation mostly to the side while favoring a particularly bright mix highlighting Bombino’s double-tracked guitar and a punchy drum kit. But the addition of female vocalist Mama “Mahassa” Walet Amoumine and periodic excursions into skanky Caribbean rhythms (wryly dubbed “Tuareggae” by Bombino) stamp Azel as yet another remarkable transition for the guitarist. Split-channel conversations with himself on “Iwaranagh” buoy one of the guitarist’s most melodically generous guitar lines, while the six-minute, crawling king-snake riff-monster “Iyat Ninhay / Jaguar” applies Led Zep bombast before indulging in a mid-point dub breakdown. Tuareggae, indeed.
Four all-acoustic reveries offer a change of pace. “Inar” and “Igmayagh Dum” match their Tamasheq lyrics of love with rhythmically lithe fretwork, the former suggesting a curious similitude with certain strains of British folk revivalism — the gentle simmer of Nick Drake’s conga-aided “Three Hours,” the circular pull-offs on Martin Carthy’s “Famous Flower of Serving Men.” Despite Bombino’s outspoken love for dad-rock favorite Mark Knopfler, there’s no sense of direct English folk homage on these tapestries, all of which owe much more to a regional acoustic affinity for so-called “dry guitar” (encompassing Kenyan folk, Sahel drone, and more). But closing tracks “Ashuhada” and “Naqqim Dagh Timshar” remind us that the delights of power chords and Brothers in Arms shouldn’t overshadow Saharan reality. “Ashuhada” is a rippling tribute to the dead from the 1990 to 1995 Tuareg Rebellion, while “Naqqim Dagh Timshar” translates as “We Are Left in This Abandoned Place” — a bleak tally of the damage done in Niger. 

No doubt Western attention to the Tuareg cause has improved the lives of some of its musicians. Yet in spite of unflagging musical elation, the long Tuareg struggle for regional autonomy looms over Bombino’s loveliest compositions. After all, the young Omara Moctar fled to Algeria during said rebellion, only to once again pack up for Burkina Faso in 2007 after the Nigerien military executed two of his fellow musicians. That’s two forced exiles in 15 years for somebody well under the age of 40, so figure Bombino knows the weary blues with an intimacy denied to either you or me. And recall that, despite the soothing nature of the NPR-approved Tinariwen, many of the band’s members were originally rebel fighters, including guitarist Ag Alhabib, who received free military training at the behest of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi (who had hopes to bolster a Saharan regiment to better advance against Mali and Chad). Ag Alhabib also witnessed, as a 4-year-old boy, the execution of his father. 

The blues are universal; the blues are also incredibly specific. As the Western pendulum of intolerance swings back toward the undifferentiated immigrant and the unnamed refugee, it’s to Bombino’s great credit as an artist, human being, and former asylum seeker that his acts of remembering a carry such a beautiful sense of plugged-in joy....by....Jason Gubbels ....~ 


The sounds of the Sahara seem to be at their loudest in the Western, popular music-sphere at current. The startling ‘Tichumaren’ blues-rock of Tuareg bands such as Tinariwen is now a commonplace feature on festival bills, whilst Damon Albarn’s favourite Malians Songhoy Blues have just finished a packed US tour and were a key feature in Johanna Schwartz’ recent documentary They Will Have to Kill Us First. 

But as Schwartz’ powerful film shows, this crossover of music cultures is not simply a pleasing result of our hyper-globalised society, but because these North Africans have a solemn story to tell. 

For decades a heady cocktail of political rebellions, uranium and land disputes, and Jihadist uprisings have forced many to flee their homes and find exile in neighbouring lands and deserts. In 2007 after the execution of two prominent Tuareg musicians, Omara Moctar, a talented young guitarist, fled his native Agadez, Niger with friends and family and sought refuge in Burkina Fasso. Moctar had earned the nickname Bombino whilst playing temporarily with the revered Tuareg guitarist Haja Bebe, and it was under this name that the ‘little one’ would prick ears worldwide. 

Bombino’s time in exile was the subject of Agadez, the Music and the Rebellion, a 2010 documentary by filmmaker Ron Wyman, who would help bring the artist into the limelight; a year later Bombino had released his first-full length, Agadez, which would top the iTunes World Chart and inspire The Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach to work with Bombino for his 2013 follow up, Nomad. 

Fully instated into the Western popular music market and touring circuits, for Bombino’s third instalment, Azel, the Nigerien returned to the States to record with Dirty Projectors’ Dave Longstreth at the Applehead Studios in Woodstock, New York. Describing the recording process, Bombino has said that Longstreth had a more open-floored approach than Auerbach’s more directorial style, which made for a fruitful working relationship: "To work with Tuareg music and musicians can be very complicated. We are not like American musicians in many ways. Our skills and our knowledge are very different from Western musicians […] So this can be a big challenge, but Dave handled himself very gracefully". 

As The Guardian’s Ally Carnwath hints at, however, perhaps there is an opportunity lost in Longstreth’s laissez-faire method; indeed, the record remains very much one sided and the sound characteristically Bombino. But importantly, Azel is not meant as a collaborative project but a continuation of the Tuareg legacy. For nomadic people, identity is a slippery term and one that cannot be so easily assigned by the markers we use for settled societies. More emphasis is thus placed on cultural expressions, and given the revolutionary and rebellious nature of the Tuareg’s project, coherency and tradition are not important but necessary. As he sings in album opener “Akhar Zaman (This Moment)”: [translated] ‘Our ancestral language and alphabet are threatening to disappear and our dearest practices are losing their place’. 

In any case, from first listen of the record, it comes of little surprise why Longstreth might be attracted to Moctar’s music, with his tireless guitar licks that seem to ooze narrative at every turn. Longstreth’s ear is a pertinent one for Bombino too; the production emphasises the depth of the spirited bass-lines whilst also capturing the guitars with high-end clarity. 

Indeed, the guitars have a sort of transcendental importance for the musician. The image of the guitar as a counter-symbol to that of the gun has its roots in the Vietnam war protest songs of the late '60s, although importantly for Jimi Hendrix the guitar was not a tool of peace but rather an axe, as in “Machine Gun”. Hendrix was a huge influence on Bombino as he cultivated his playing as a teen whilst in Algeria, and that’s certainly still evident in Azel; from start to finish Moctar’s left hand flutters and glides to mesmerising and melodious effect, either electronically as in “Iwaranagh (We Must)” or acoustically in tracks like “Igmayagh Dum (My Lover)”. 

Interestingly, there’s a splash of reggae thrown into the mix at some points, or as Bombino calls it, ‘Tuareggae’. It fits surprisingly well, as in “Timtar (Memories)”, a delightful track with call and response and tempo changes, and which is aptly named given it’s strangely nostalgic feel. 

Importantly though, for Bombino and his fellow Tuareg, to pick up a guitar and play so enticingly and vibrantly is a direct act of rebellion, at least in the context of their home countries. After the 2007 Tuareg rebellion, the Nigerien government banned the use of guitars, clearly not underestimating their power for spreading revolt. This considered, Azel becomes even more triumphant, and listening to it all the more enjoyable; whilst he sings in Tamasheq, the language of the Tuareg, his guitar truly has a voice of its own. 

Since its genesis, rock music — in a Western context, anyway — has been subject to criticisms surrounding the authenticity of its seemingly rebellious aesthetic. As Keir Keightley shows in his insightful essay ‘Reconsidering Rock’, even at its most outspoken moments, rock has only existed within the framework of a mass-entertainment industry. While Bombino and his fellow Tuareg's music is now well settled in the same market, the rebellion which fuels their music is very real, and as such, Azel is a breath of fresh air. ...By John Bell ...~ 


For his third studio album, Omara "Bombino" Moctar traveled from the desert of Niger in West Africa to a lush wooded farm and recording studio in Woodstock, N.Y. Impossible to say how the change of scenery affected the sessions, but you can't argue with the results. In the Tamasheq language of the Tuareg people, Bombino sings of love ("Inar") and life ("Naqqim Dagh Timshar"), and war and death ("Ashuhada"), all while his dizzying guitar work invokes an endless Saharan walkabout. Backed by a full band, there are flourishes of rock and even reggae, but Azel stirs up another desert blues masterpiece. ....BY THOMAS FAWCETT....~ 


Έφτασε αισίως στον τρίτο του δίσκο ο αγαπημένος Bombino συνεχίζοντας με το "Azel" το επιτυχημένο σερί.
Ως γνήσιος Tuareg καλλιτέχνης αποδίδει έντεχνα τον μαγικό κόσμο των αφρικάνικων Blues τα οποία είναι εδώ και λίγα χρόνια (και όχι άδικα) στα πολύ πάνω τους.
Το "Azel" προσφέρει στον ακροατή ένα μελωδικό 45 λεπτό ταξίδι στα βάθη της Αφρικανικής Σαβάνας με τα νοσταλγικά καρέ να διαδέχονται το ένα το άλλο δίνοντας την ψευδαίσθηση ότι βρίσκεσαι ήδη εκεί. Η κατανόηση των στίχων δύσκολη αφού η γλώσσα δεν είναι στα αγγλικά αλλά και περιττή καθώς η μουσική σε καλύπτει. 
Top κομμάτια "Akhar Zaman (This Moment)", "Iwaranagh (We Must)", "Inar ( If You Know the Degree of My Love for You)", "Iyat Ninhay - Jaguar (A Great Desert I Saw) 











Credits 

Backing Vocals [Female] – Mama ‘Mahassa’ Walet Amoumene 
Backing Vocals [Male] – Abdoulahi ‘Koutana’ Mohamed Van Loon* 
Bass – Youba Dia* 
Cover [Cover Photo Of Bombino], Photography By [Cover Photo Of Bombino] – Vittorio Catti 
Djembe – Corey Wilhelm (tracks: 2, 3, 6), Abdoulahi ‘Koutana’ Mohamed Van Loon* (tracks: 1, 4, 5, 7 to 10) 
Drums [Drum Kit], Calabash, Congas, Shaker – Corey Wilhelm 
Lead Guitar, Lead Vocals – Omara ‘Bombino’ Moctar* 
Organ [Hammond Organ] – Dave Longstreth* 
Rhythm Guitar – Avi Salloway (tracks: 1, 6), Omara ‘Bombino’ Moctar* (tracks: 2 to 5, 7 to 10) 
Written-By, Adapted By [Traditional Adaptations] – Abdallah Ag Alhousseyni (tracks: 6), Hasso Akhoté* (tracks: 1), Ibrahim Ag Abreybom (tracks: 2), Omara ‘Bombino’ Moctar* (tracks: 3 to 5, 7 to 10) 








Tracks List:
1. Akhar Zaman (3:51)
2. Iwaranagh (4:59)
3. Inar (3:46)
4. Tamiditine Tarhanam (4:03)
5. Timtar (4:53)
6. Iyat Ninhay / Jaguar (6:07)
7. Igmayagh Dum (5:45)
8. Ashuhada (3:24)
9. Timidiwa (4:21)
10. Naqqim Dagh Timshar (5:39) 



watch
Bombino “Nomad” 2013 Nigeria Desert Blues,Electric Blues,Blues Rock 


watch...
Bombino “Agadez” 2011 Nigeria Ethnic Desert Blues

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