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21 Sep 2016

Douglas Fair ‎ “Hard Heartsingin'1970 US Psychedelic Acid Rock









Douglas Fair ‎ “Hard Heartsingin'1970 US  excellent  Psychedelic Acid Rock…recommended..!
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The one and only album by this great Pacific Northwest band, recorded and originally released in 1970, is a mix of hard-driving psychedelic rock, heavy blues, and atmospheric ballads with big studio production. Flowing organs, powerful Doorsy vocals, and hard-edged guitars. Nice orchestrations on some tracks, which bring to mind Love’s Forever Changes (1967) or Johnny Rivers’s Realization (1973). Original master sound; includes insert with liner notes. …… 

classic 1970 LP, recorded in the great Pacific Northwest State of Portand, Oregon. Great heavy and haunting organ, driving guitars, and outstanding “Guess Who” style. …. 

By the sound of Hard Heart Singin’, Douglas Fir must have been a smoking little blues-rock combo. They may have existed purely as a bar band, but the Pacific Northwest dives where they honed their sound must have been some pretty trippy little establishments, as evidenced by the brooding, ominous, mildly psychedelic (depending on your definition of the genre) nature of their rock & roll. Everything about the music is coated in a dense, smothering atmosphere (in a good way), as if it is all emanating from a small box rather than the band at the front of the room. The recording displays the same ponderous, cloistered, roadhouse blues edge of the Doors, and they share some of the Band’s interest in old-time ambience, evident in the wonderful, rolling Ray Charles piano of “Smokey Joe’s,” and the perfectly placed soul horn charts of “Moratorium Waltz.” Richie Moore’s guitar work entirely avoids showy ostentation like Robbie Robertson and occasionally matches the sustained tone of Randy California (although it is not generally as distinctive as either guitarist’s talent). The songwriting – nine originals plus a lulling Moody Blues-like cover of Donovan’s “Jersey Thursday” – is solid throughout. The ballads, which make up an uncommon majority of the album, veer into soft psych territory to a greater degree than the more propulsive songs. They are all very much above average – particularly for an unknown band – and often have a transfixing power, especially the engrossing title track and “Tom’s Song.” The rockers are more realistically situated somewhere between revved-up hard rock and progressive blues, all played with rollicking bar band energy and featuring exceptional playing from the trio and the fabulous pipes of drummer Doug Snider. His phrasing is so grounded in the soul aesthetic that the music fairly buzzes with wrenching emotion. His drumming, too, is wondrous, and his dexterous timekeeping spikes the music with a mystical, jazzy vibe on songs such as “I Didn’t Try” and “21 Years,” while Tim Doyle’s Hammond B3 work is never less than sensational. It may be cliché to make such a statement in regard to a little-known band from the era, but Douglas Fir truly deserved a better shake from the music industry. Hard Heart Singin’ is plenty resonant to stand next to the B list, if not the top-level hard rock albums of the era….by allmusic….. 

By the sound of Hard Heart Singin’, Douglas Fir must have been a smoking little blues-rock combo. They may have existed purely as a bar band, but the Pacific Northwest dives where they honed their sound must have been some pretty trippy little establishments, as evidenced by the brooding, ominous, mildly psychedelic (depending on your definition of the genre) nature of their rock & roll. Everything about the music is coated in a dense, smothering atmosphere (in a good way), as if it is all emanating from a small box rather than the band at the front of the room. The recording displays the same ponderous, cloistered, roadhouse blues edge of the Doors, and they share some of the Band’s interest in old-time ambience, evident in the wonderful, rolling Ray Charles piano of “Smokey Joe’s,” and the perfectly placed soul horn charts of “Moratorium Waltz.” Richie Moore’s guitar work entirely avoids showy ostentation like Robbie Robertson and occasionally matches the sustained tone of Randy California (although it is not generally as distinctive as either guitarist’s talent). The songwriting – nine originals plus a lulling Moody Blues-like cover of Donovan’s “Jersey Thursday” – is solid throughout. The ballads, which make up an uncommon majority of the album, veer into soft psych territory to a greater degree than the more propulsive songs. They are all very much above average – particularly for an unknown band – and often have a transfixing power, especially the engrossing title track and “Tom’s Song.” The rockers are more realistically situated somewhere between revved-up hard rock and progressive blues, all played with rollicking bar band energy and featuring exceptional playing from the trio and the fabulous pipes of drummer Doug Snider. His phrasing is so grounded in the soul aesthetic that the music fairly buzzes with wrenching emotion. His drumming, too, is wondrous, and his dexterous timekeeping spikes the music with a mystical, jazzy vibe on songs such as “I Didn’t Try” and “21 Years,” while Tim Doyle’s Hammond B3 work is never less than sensational. It may be clichι to make such a statement in regard to a little-known band from the era, but Douglas Fir truly deserved a better shake from the music industry. Hard Heart Singin’ is plenty resonant to stand next to the B list, if not the top-level hard rock albums of the era. ~ Stanton Swihart … 

It was an incredible era….one like we’ll never see again. Howdy, I’m Douglas A. Snider (AKA Douglas Fir). The band was formed as a complete foursome after many of the tracks on the album had already been cut. The original band was a trio comprised of myself on drums and lead vocals, Tim Doyle on Hammond B-3, and Richie Moore on guitar. We went by the name of “The Sun Trio”. 

We played alot of “Meat Marketn Bars” in order to pay for the studio time and worked day jobs as well. I worked the high timber industry as a logger and fire fighter. Tim worked in construction, and Richie (the smart one in retrospect) drove a liquor delivery truck. We had a dream…to cut an album and hit the big time…and we damned near did it!! We were totally committed to the project!! It was our dream…the only thing we thought of day and night. We were fortunate in that a couple of guys named Mike Carter and Russ Gorsline, two great recording engineers, also got caught up in the energy of the project. 

They fronted us alot of studio time, and when we couldn’t pay at times, they shuffled alot of paper around so the studio’s owners didn’t see the bills. We wrote and recorded some of the songs on the studio floor, and others took more planning and time (obviously the cuts with strings, horns, etc.).After laboring for two long years, we finally decided that we had enough to show the record companies. SO…The big plunge…broke and owing studios, I sold my Honda 305 Scrambler and bought a one-way ticket to Hollywood. 

Many hours pounding the pavement and dealing with rejection….Until I met a man by accident in an elevator in the Sunset Vine Towers. Serendipity! The man turned out to be one of Hollywood’s hottest arrangers at the time. After a few beers (quite a few) he took me down to the third floor and introduced me to executives from MGM/QUAD Records and we played the tape…Magic…a deal was struck immediately, the studio bills were paid off, and we added Bruce Bye on bass making the final composite of Douglas Fir. 

MGM released a single titled “Smokey Joe’s” which received a great deal of airplay, and we toured briefly before the label folded. That’s showbiz, folks. But hey…we had a great time making these tracks, playing the 60’s bars and Groovin’. And By God, we sold the album even if we didn’t get the big hit. Thanks for listening in!! 
by Douglas A. Snider, Hendersonville, Tennessee ….. 

*Richie Moore - Guitar 
*Tim Doyle - Keyboards 
*Douglas A. Snider - Drums, Vocals 
*Bruce Bye - Bass 

1. Hard Heartsingin (D. T. Jay, D. A. Snider) - 4:23 
2. Jersey Thursday (Donovan P. Leitch) - 2:18 
3. I Didn’t Try (D.T. Jay, R.L. Moore, D.A. Snider) - 3:40 
4. Early In The Morning Rain (Jay, Moore, Snider) - 3:51 
5. New Orleans Queen (Snider, Bye, Fetsch, Gorsline) - 3:17 
6. Moratorium Waltz (Douglas A. Snider) - 3:05 
7. Smokey Joe’s (Bye/Fetsch, Moore, Snider) - 2:19 
8. Comin’ Back Home (Douglas A. Snider) - 3:52 
9. Tom’s Song (Fetsch, Ford, Snider) - 3:01 
10.21 Years (Moore, Snider) - 2:54 

johnkatsmc5, welcome music..

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