Sunday, 25 September 2016

Jukin’ Bone (Free Will) “Way Down East “ 1972 US Heavy Blues Rock first album


Jukin’ Bone “Way Down East “ 1972 US Heavy Rock first album
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Jukin' Bone  “Whiskey Woman 1972 + “ Way Down East” 1972 full two albums in okru



The band was formed in 1969, and early next year they were joined by two of that of all the participants really were in music-MARK DOYLE and JOE WHITING.Gruppa recorded two albums Way Down East (1970) and WHISKEY WOMAN (1971) the traditional hard rock and sold in early 1973. DOYLE worked with guitarist Andy Pratt, Cindy Bullens, Leo Sayer-since the early ‘80s he worked with Meat Loaf and Bryan Adams.V early 90s working as a session guitarist in Japan SONY.Periodicheski released solo records and worked with JOE WHITING, which poskitatsya in different groups since the early 90s steadily gaining popularity as a blues ispolnitel.Ne know they reminisced about his first band, but in 2004 the magazine Creem Magazine album included two hundred classic hard rock album (I do not know who made up this list but with two albums JUKIN 'BONE there for 2 (!!!) album GRAND FUNK, 1 (Exclamation Exclamation Exclamation) DEEP PURPLE and 2 (Exclamation Exclamation Exclamation) LED ZEPPELIN) Spisochek albums, of course, specific, but after that both albums Group re-released on CD, and even got the third alleged unreleased album, recruited from various demos…..

Tom Glaister at East High, 1969

Tom, Joe and George, Country Tavern, 1970



JUKIN’ BONE CIRCA 1971, FEATURING (FROM LEFT) JOHN DEMASO, JOE WHITING, TOM GLAISTER, GEORGE EGOSARIAN AND MARK DOYL

Joe, Mark, John & Tom, J-E High, 1970

Free Will & Juckin Bone Bio 

Jukin 'Bone is an American group of Hard Blues Boogie Rock from Syracuse, New York, operating between 1972 and 1973. 
But before that, by the end of 1966, this relentless rock quintet was called Free Will, directed by guitarist Mark Doyle and singer Joe Whiting. 
The group also included second guitarist George Egosarian, bassist John DeMaso and extraordinary drummer Tom Glaister. 
An earlier version of Free Will included Bill Irvin on rhythm guitar and Barry Maturevitz on bass.In fact, and as few people know, a relatively unknown group like many others at the time was formed in 1962 in Skaneateles, New York, and its members then stopped influencing the music scene of Central New York. 
This one, under the name of "The Ridgewoods" was formed in the summer of 1962 at a time when American teenagers were still listening to the Beach Boys and where the British invasion was about to change music forever. 
It consisted of Bob Dean (bass), John Dean (drums), Tom Dean (guitar) and Terry Horricks (solo guitar). 
The band remained unchanged until the summer of 1963 when Joe Whiting (saxophone, vocals) became his fifth member. 
Terry Horricks left in the Spring of 1964, he was replaced by guitarist Limey Wickwire. 
On April 1, 1964, the Ridgewoods made their public debut for the first time for a fee of $ 25. 
They played and sang pop music of the moment specializing in Beatles, Animals, Rolling Stones, Beach Boys with some original songs. 
In the fall of 1964, Wickwire left and he was replaced by guitarist Craig Bennett. 
A year later Bob Dean left for school and Barry Maturevitz joined them on bass. 
When Bennett left, John Dean switched from drums to guitar and Al Klimak replaced John Dean on drums.During this period, the Ridgewoods ventured into the Syracuse Riposo Studio and recorded their first two songs: "You're For Me" and "It's Only Life". They appeared at the PLAV on West Genesee Street in Syracuse and the group then visited the WOLF Radio studio. They sang a "Coke-A-Cola Radio Jungle" for WOLF's night deejay, Jim Sims. "... Things get better with Coke and Jim Sims, things get better with Coke, Hi we're the Ridgewoods and you listen to the Jim Sims swinging show ...". This was aired every night during the rest of 1966. 
In September 1966, Tom Dean left and Holly Gregg (who will later be a member of Dean Brother for a long time) was added. 
Holly was with the band just four months old while the Ridgewoods were playing their last concert on December 27, 1966. 
When the Ridgewoods split up in December 1966, there was a split. 
In December 1966, Joe Whiting teamed up with legendary Mark Doyle from Auburn to form the "New Ridgewoods" and added drummer Tom Glaister, bassist Barry Maturevitz (a member of the Ridgewoods) and rhythm guitarist Chuck Baron , they change their name to "Free Will". 
Note that Doyle had worked with guitarist Andy Pratt, Cindy Bullens and Leo Sayer. Since the early 80's he has worked with Meat Loaf and Bryan Adams. 
During the summer of 1967, Baron is replaced by John Dean and Bill Irwin is added. In Spring 1967, the bassist Maturevitz is replaced by George Egosarian. 
A year later Egosarian was replaced by John DeMaso. 
In 1969, Bill Irwin left and George Egosarian joined the group. 
Free Will took a look at the music scene covering their home base by playing at Lake Dances in Auburn, Fabins at Skaneateles, Jordan-Elbridge High School and East High School (Auburn) where they played. was one of the first to play a concert in a sitting auditorium rather than a gym. 
They exploded in the Syracuse market by playing in different places like the Scene (Dewitt), Jabberwocky (SU Campus) and Country Tavern. 
Their music was anchored in the British Blues playing Savoy Brown, Fleetwood Mac, John Mayall, etc. 
They were playing the whole album "Arthur" of the Kinks and an incredible melody of Spirit. Not to mention the famous covers of Chuck Berry and the version of "Candyman" by Roy Orbison. They also performed several originals such as "Carry Me Home", "Ridin 'With The Devil" and "Get That Shinning Sun". 
During this period, Free Will ventured into Connecticut recording several demo songs at the end of 1969. This session included the only recorded versions of the legendary songs "Are You Gone" and "State Police Googie", both original . 
They also performed several originals such as "Carry Me Home", "Ridin 'With The Devil" and "Get That Shinning Sun". 
During this period, Free Will ventured into Connecticut recording several demo songs at the end of 1969. 
This session included the only recorded versions of their original legendary songs "Are You Gone" and "State Police Googie". Free Will has become an ultra-exciting live band, as evidenced by the group's independent live LP 1970, "Live at Jabberwocky", highlighted by a breathtaking seven minutes and 26 seconds of "Ridin 'with the Devil". 
After attracting record crowds from 1968 to 1971 at Thruway nightclubs, high schools and colleges, Free Will signed a $ 35,000 recording deal for three CDs with RCA, guaranteed by Concerts West. 
The group had its heyday at Wheels, a Manhattan nightclub on the Upper East Side. 
Free Will became one of three Rock bands to sign major label deals in the early 1970s. 
They joined Jam Factory (Epic) and Ronnie James Dio in Elf (Purple Records / MGM) to try national glory and fortune. 
However, before the band plugged into Jimi Hendrix's legendary Electric Lady Studio in Greenwich Village, RCA demanded that Free Will change their name. 
With its line up finally stabilized in Autumn 1971, Free Will became "Jukin 'Bone". 
"... We found Jukin 'Bone's name, one way or another ..." said Whiting. "... RCA found that the name Free Will was a kind of esoteric, especially given the harshness of the band.I think George (Egosarian) was involved.Jukin 'Bone sounded hard Thanks to RCA Records, the band enters the Electric Ladyland studio in New York in 1972 and records their first album entitled "Whiskey Woman": 
"... The producer, Lewis Merenstein, had seen us (playing live) under good circumstances, and he advised us to do a live recording," recalls Whiting. But the band decided to try to capture their live sound in the studio ... "..." 
... Then we made the first of many stupid mistakes by taking some free time, about two months without playing, then we went directly to the studio ... ", said Whiting." ... Also, we were rusty ... " 
Merenstein, then 37, had recorded records since 1959. His credits ranged from Charlie Musselwhite to Spencer Davis Group, from Charlie Daniels to George Burns, led the Jukin 'Bone sessions for the nine-track LP. 
"... Lewis had produced 'Astral Weeks' and 'Moondance' by Van Morrison, and Mama Cass's first solo album, so he had good references ...", said Whiting. "... I really think he was a jazzman at heart ...". 
Perhaps that's why the cover of "Whiskey Woman" was a marquee for Roseland Dance City, although Louis Brecker, the owner of the Roseland Ballroom in New York City, banned Rock'n'Roll at this point of reference of Manhattan. 
For "Whiskey Woman", Merenstein and the band avoided studio tricks by rehearsing all or most of the nine songs every night, then choosing what was considered the best. 
Doyle remembers the buffet table of the studio well stocked with liquor and cocaine. "... Everyone was gaining height at that time ...", he said. 
Free Will's factotum, Dave Rezak, who later became the best booking agent in Syracuse, confirmed that Whiskey Woman's sessions were "well lubricated". 
"... But we were not out of our heads ..." Whiting insisted. And the performances - though not as fascinating as their live shows - were more than respectable, exuding a hard-rockin 'groove' Authentic Blues on originals such as 'Jungle Fever' and 'Got the Need', as well as covers from "Spirit in the Dark" by Aretha Franklin and "The Hunter" by Booker T. 
While the rhythm section created a solid foundation, Doyle's dynamic guitar work, ranging from single solos to cascading single note to slippery slides, and Whiting's burning and searing vocals led the day ... or night, depending on the case. 
But "Whiskey Woman" did not meet the expectations of the group and RCA. He failed the sale, and was not even accepted by the Free Will fan base in Central New York. "... Nobody was happy with the first LP ...", said Whiting. 
Doyle also listened to longtime local fans. "... A guy said to me, 'Dude, you got screwed by the production ...'" 
The album went almost unnoticed, although the band had at least a chance to 
But drummer Tom Glaister got married and left the band. He was replaced by two drummers Kevin Shwaryk and Danny Coward. Two singles, one from the first opus, "Whiskey Woman" and the sexy "Cara Lynn", followed in 1972 and a second album entitled " Way Down East "was published in 1973. However, even before Jukin 'Bone could fix the failure of the first album - in fact, even before" Whiskey Woman "was released - the band was already to separate. Drummer Tom Glaister was the first to leave, and rhythm guitarist George Egosarian was also eager to do so. 
And it was a few months later, while they were preparing "Way Down East", that Glaister left and not one but two drummers, Danny Coward and Kevin Shwaryk, took his place. "... Tom was a drummer monster ...", recalls Whiting, "... and we thought the best way to replace him was to play with a drummer duo ...". 
Producer Lewis Merenstein and the group, now working at RCA Studios, were better focused, and the result was a decidedly neater recording. 
"... In fact, I prefer the second album ...", said Whiting. "... we played better ..." 
"... we were stricter ...", Doyle emphasized. 
But even more than moderation, "Way Down East" has benefited from a renewed approach encompassing the benefits of studio technology. "... The second album was a studio album: no live audience, no rehearsals of all the songs every night ..." said Whiting. "... Instead, we recorded song by song, so it was more of an effort in the studio ...", with overdubs. 
"... Joe sounded better ..." said Doyle, "... and the disc sold better ...". 
This second disc was more refined than their first one but in fact to the detriment of the music. 
However, Llalbum shows the forces of the group in presence. 
While the band can definitely play, spreading Doyle's biting guitar slide on a funky bass groove on "Nightcrawler," and yelling a roaring anthem of lust on "Cara Lynn," their music is never rough enough. 
Like Cactus or Black Oak Arkansas, they were the best when it came to blasting their music, as has amply demonstrated "Whiskey Woman". 
The addition of an electric piano helps a bit on the marshy "Mojo Conqueroo", and Whiting leads a nasty and screaming version of "See See Rider" which is not as disturbed as their interpretation of "Candy Man" of Roy Orbison from their beginnings, but it's pretty rude. 
This album is highly recommended for Hard Rock fans of the '70s. 
A very important fact, "... Jukin' Bone was one of the most electrifying live bands you could ever see ..." said Ron Wray, the authority of the music of Syracuse. "... They went on tour but never received enough promotion across the country, although they may be very close to the national celebrity ...". 
After the release of "Way Down East" in 1972, Jukin 'Bone made a tour from November to December 1972 with ZZ Top, Freddie King, the Allman Bros, the Kinks, John Mayall and Three Dog Night, among others. 
This tour included the following stops: Alabama (Montgomery and Huntsville), Arkansas (Fort Smith), Iowa (DesMoines), Kansas (Wichita), Louisiana (Monroe, Shreveport), Minnesota (Duluth, Minn, St Paul), Missouri (Colombia ), North Carolina (Ashville), North and South Dakota, Tennessee (Memphis), Texas (Austin, Dallas, Harlingen, Houston, Odessa, San Angelo, Waco) and Wisconsin (Madison, Sheboygan). 
But on July 14, 1973, drummer Danny Coward left the band leaving Jukin 'Bone in a quartet: Mark Doyle, Joe Whiting, John DeMaso and Kevin Shwaryk. 
"... we were dealing with a lot of internal friction ...", Whiting recalled. He and Doyle tended to blame each other for the group's many missteps. "... The management left, and the others wanted to leave, we realized it was over ...". 
When they had signed with RCA, they had been outright informed that if their disks remained stored on the market, the group would be released from its contract. "... it never occurred to us that we would not sell ..." said Whiting laughing. But after the release of "Way Down East", the band dissolved and RCA canceled plans for a third record. 
"... things did not work out as we expected ..." said Whiting. "... 
Of the $ 35,000 the company paid in Jukin 'Bone, Doyle said the musicians only pocketed $ 250 each. "... but we did not care, as long as they kept us ...". 
The main problem, according to Doyle, was: "... no one was watching over you, people wanted to go out and party with the group, but they should have taken care of the group ...". 
Whiting thinks that Jukin 'Bone was the victim of some kind of Murphy Rock'n'Roll law: "... The truth is, and that's what I always say about Jukin' Bone, that all this that could go wrong went wrong ... ". 
Still, in the fall of 1973, Jukin 'Bone, the largest group in Syracuse, was dissolved. 
Under the title "The Lost Third Album", it will appear later, produced by Mark Doyle. 
After the split, Mark Doyle went to play with DUV (Dave Hanlon, Rick Cua) and David Werner, while Joe Whiting joined Bobby Comstock on tour and the rest of the musicians broke up. The group met and recorded live tracks that will become the "Free Will Live on Stage" CD (a majority recorded at the Key Bank Rock & Roll Festival in Clinton Square, June 1999) and this album was released in June 2000 on Free Will Records. Finally, they met again for the '2004 Sammy Award Show' followed by a performance at Dinosaur Bar B Que this same weekend.....~ 


Joe Whiting at Jabberwocky, 1970

Members: 
Joe Whiting (vocals) 
Mark Doyle (lead guitar, piano) 
George Egosarian (rhythm guitar, slide guitar) 
John DeMaso (bass) 
Tom Glaister (drums, percussion) 


001. Cara Lynn (02:28) 
002. Way Down East (03:08) 
003. Nightcrawler (04:33) 
004. Come On Home (02:26) 
005. Mojo Conqueroo (05:54) 
006. See See Rider (02:54) 
007. Can You Feel It (03:09) 
008. Yes Is Yes (02:50) 
009. Sayin’ It Is Easy (03:06) 
010. Johnny Lee’s Mood (05:11) 



Discography 

Jukin 'Bone 

Whiskey Woman 1971 
Way Down East 1972 
Electric Lady Sessions, 1971 
Shoreline Farewell, 1973 
The Lost Third Album 1973 
Get Boned! - Live at the Dinosaur, 2004 

Free Will 

Cold, Cold Morning - 1969 
Live at East High 1969 
Live at Jordan-Elbridge High School, 1970 
Live at Jabberwocky, 1970 
The Tony Caputo Tapes, 1971 
Live at Mother Earth, Austin 1971 
The Basement Tapes, 1970-71 
Live On Stage, 2000 



watch..

Jukin' Bone "Whiskey Woman" second album 1972 + "The Lost 3Rd Album " 1973 (Syracuse, New York) Hard Rock Blues Rock 

watch.....
Free Will (pre Jukin Bone) “Live At Jabberwocky” 1970 (bootleg) US Hard Blues Rock 


watch.....
Free Will (pre Jukin’ Bone) “Cold, Cold Morning” 1969 reissue 1977 by Guiness Records as"Here's Free Will" + "Cold,Gold Morning" Demos 1969 both released as double Lp Compilation 2017 by The Grail Records Production -‎ US Hard Blues Rock 
https://johnkatsmc5.blogspot.gr/2016/09/free-will-cold-cold-morning-1969-us.html


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