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Saturday, 22 October 2016

Stone The Crows “Stone The Crows” 1970 UK Prog Blues Rock debut album

Stone The Crows “Stone The Crows” 1970 UK Prog Blues Rock debut album
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Stone The Crows “Freedom Road”  1970 with Maggie Bell video HD 1080 p  on google+

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Apparently, from the very beginning Stone The Crows decided to fill in the niche that was somehow liberated after the demise of the classic Big Brother & The Holding Company lineup. They lose it in one respect: as classy a vocalist as Maggie Bell is, the inevitable comparison with Janis Joplin cannot be won, not the least due to the fact that Maggie’s full vocal potential rests unexplored here, partially due to strange self-limitations, partially due to ugly muddy production. They win, however, in the respect that the band actually had two talented vocalists at the point of its creation: Maggie’s feminine vocal is perfectly opposed by the masculine vocal of James (here Jim, he would later ‘grow up’ to his full name as the trusty sidekick to Robin Trower) Dewar. Besides, they also win by simply being more technically efficient, with Les Harvey being able to both rip it up on his six-string when needed and play in a restrained and economic mood when necessary. Plus, they have a nice organ going for them courtesy of John McGinnis, and what else do you need?

Stone The Crows isn’t exactly a 'heavy’ album by itself, but despite being released in 1969, it certainly sounds like a Seventies album in many respects. A fat, gritty, powerful sound, a sidelong epic, a thoroughly humorless and 'desperate’ delivery, all these features probably explain why none other than Peter Grant actually took a liking to the band. There’s nothing particularly innovative about the songs on here, but it’s pretty strange anyway that it failed to establish Maggie Bell as one of Britain’s premiere vocalists - supposedly a hot white soul singerine wasn’t exactly the forte of the sensitive British public of the time. Or maybe, since Janis was still alive, people were willing to go for the 'real thing’ rather than an inferior, if still solid, imitation.
Whatever, the first side of the album is among the most powerful sides of British blues-rock/R'n'B of the epoch I’ve ever heard. The album opens with two Harvey - Dewar originals, the first of which, the slow-burning 'Touch Of Your Loving Hand’, can seem a bit too plodding and stiff; besides, I already hear all the “faux-soul, disgusting faux-soul!” cries of Temptations and Jackson Five purists out there, but since it’s a well-known fact that all purists are fascists by definition, we’ll just leave it at that. Actually, I don’t think even that many purists would want to castigate this stuff - Dewar and Bell duet with each other at the top of their powers, and the track slowly but gradually progresses towards a tremendous climax, assisted by a tasteful guitar solo and dreamy organ background. And then along comes track number two, the fast funky 'Raining In Your Heart’, with a red-hot sizzling guitar line and Derek-and-the-Dominoes-like organ and magnificent vocal parties whose only flaw is being buried so goddamn deep under the guitar. Shoot the engineer. One of the best ever songs by the band, kudos for the organ riff and the terrific drive anyway. And a climactic ending.
They then proceed to leave Harvey and Bell alone in the studio, Les playing a great bluesy pattern and Maggie impersonating the 'Blind Man’ - the obvious spot to actually make a careful assessment of the girl’s voice. MIGHTY voice for sure. And while we’re at it, I wonder if that astutest and fattest of managers, Peter Grant, ever had the obvious idea of having Maggie try out the position of Robert Plant? Heh heh. One thing’s for sure, Maggie would have blown the Lion Mane straight out of the window. And of course, Robbie would never have managed to perform such a beautiful version of 'Fool On The Hill’ as Maggie does - they arrange the song as a straightforward soul number, and unbelievable as it seems, it works, although it took me a couple listens to get used to the band totally slaughtering a vital part of the original vocal melody in favour of 'free-form’ vocal twists. But they’re actually fine.
Too bad the band went a bit too far in the 'artsy’ direction and entirely ruined the second side of this album, thus mercilessly massacring a fine, sincere, raw and powerful experience. 'I Saw America’ is an eighteen-minute pastiche of blues, folk, and hard elements, destined to represent the band’s impressions of their first visit to the States. It’s hopelessly pretentious and therefore inadequate - had the guys really been experts in Americana subjects, they definitely wouldn’t stoop to this kind of this stuff, and as 'novices’ in these matters, the track is well, made to look really stupid. The segments don’t mesh together well; the generic blues tidbits look painfully generic, as if they thought that incorporating the little pieces into one large medley freed them from the necessity of actually making them interesting, and to make matters worse, there’s a sort of dissonant free-jazz passage towards the end of the song which is sloppy, hopelessly amateurish and so boring you hardly ever get to the actual end of the track - too bad, since the last three minutes, where they all of a sudden launch into a grumbly heavy rock jam with Harvey spitting out rapid fire licks and Dewar pounding on his bass like a true mountaineer (the band was of Scottish origin, remember), is the composition’s best and only memorable passage. But, of course, it hardly justifies sitting through the first fifteen minutes anyway.
So, I guess, this is a “Sixties” album after all, in that it’s one of those usual cases for that epoch when a great first half of the album can be hideously annihilated by a thoroughly dated 'experimental’ second half. Kinda like Love’s Da Capo. You know what I mean. Don’t let that stop you from loving the first side, though: the first side doesn’t at all sound amateurish …

Maggie Bell Dinner with Arthur Brown - 2015
Maggie Bell Dinner with Arthur Brown - 2015
The eponymous debut opens with a blues belter featuring two of the best blues-rock vocalists this country has produced: Maggie Bell and Jim Dewar.

The joint approach on vocals (echoed by the band’s contemporaries Robert Palmer and Elkie Brooks in Vinegar Joe) continues on 'Raining In Your Heart’. This track cracks along at a fiery pace with some super Les Harvey guitar and John McGinnis’ keyboard interjections.

Two covers (a Josh White song 'Blind Man’ and the Beatles’ 'Fool On The Hill’) give Maggie Bell the chance to stretch out with bluesy accompaniment from Harvey. 'I Saw America’ filled one side of the original LP and features a number of blues rock to jazz themes with McGinnis’ keys and Harvey’s guitar to the fore. In places, they sound like The Doors at their moody best, with Harvey’s input always tastefully economical, much like Robby Kreiger.

When you consider that Stone The Crows also had Colin Allen on drums (ex-John Mayall, later with Focus) this was a veritable 'supergroup’ at the time. The band were a major draw on the live circuit in the UK but never achieved wider success. …


Taking their moniker from a exclamatory term used for the meaning of shock and awe, STONE THE CROWS were the product of several years jamming around the toilet circuit as 60s covers band, Power. Starring two lead vocalists, one of them MAGGIE BELL (touted as Scotland’s answer to JANIS JOPLIN); the other singer/bassist James Dewar, the blues-driven rock quintet looked an ominous project until an astounding LED ZEPPELIN manager Peter Grant took them under his wing; they inked a global deal with Polydor Records.
Known as much for Maggie’s raucous vocal gymnastics, as for the untimely and tragic death in May ‘72 of one of its core members, guitarist Les Harvey, Glasgow’s STONE THE CROWS were the buzz around the city when they formed in 1969. So, with a line-up that comprised Bell, Dewar, Harvey, plus John McGinnis (keyboards) and Englishman Colin Allen (drums) – the latter from JOHN MAYALL’S BLUESBREAKERS, the aforementioned Grant and sidekick Mark London worked on producing an album to equal the group’s electrifying live shows. Bell and her organic, bluesy vocals was an essential ingredient in the band’s soulful rock stew.
The eponymous STONE THE CROWS (1970) {*6} was a sprawling mess of an album, toing and froing (and indeed crowing) from one direction to another: psychedelic blues, progressive soul and hard-rock – but somehow the epic, side-long `I Saw America’, seemed to gel beyond its grandiose self-indulgence. On the flip, however, the Dewar/Harvey-authored `The Touch Of Your Hand’ and `Raining In Your Heart’ (Dewar almost a match for RAY CHARLES or JOE COCKER), were overshadowed by the JOPLIN-esque screeches of BELL on covers of JOSH WHITE’s `Blind Man’ and The BEATLES’ `Fool On The Hill’.
With much the same formula as its predecessor (although McGinnis was afforded three compositions), sophomore set ODE TO JOHN LAW (1970) {*6} missed the boat once again. Despite the encouraging reception for `Sad Mary’ and `Love 74’, Allen and Harvey’s funky `Mad Dogs And Englishmen’ (not the Noel Coward dirge) and a cover of Percy Mayfield’s `Danger Zone’, fell short of their earlier promise; Dewar seemed almost relegated to backing singer. It was then no surprise that McGinnis, then Dewar, took flight, the latter leaving his musical imprint as lead singer with the short-lived Jude and, in turn, ROBIN TROWER’s band.
Fresh recruits Ronnie Leahy (from WHITE TRASH) and Steve Thompson were on board for the recording of TEENAGE LICKS (1972) {*7}, a record which seemed certain to furnish STC with the fruits (at least in terms of critical favour) they deserved. Bell, Harvey and the group (augmented on a few tracks by GONG’s Daevid Allen) were now firing on all cylinders, breaking free from their blues shackles, co-writing beefy ballads such as `Big Jim Salter’, `I May Be Right, I May Be Wrong’ and `Mr. Wizard’. Of course, there were cover placements in an unrecognisable DYLAN re-vamp of `Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right’, and blink-or-you’ll-miss-it Celtic/trad-folk ditty, `Ailen Mochree’.
But just when things looked on the upsurge, the group’s momentum stopped in its tracks following the electrocution of Les Harvey during a live performance at Swansea University on 3rd May that year. Seasoned campaigner Jimmy McCulloch (ex-THUNDERCLAP NEWMAN) stepped in on short notice to finish off the sessions for ONTINUOUS PERFORMANCE (1972) {*5}, an album that finally saw STONE THE CROWS cracking the Top 40. Still showcasing the dexterity and talent of Harvey on all but two tracks (`Good Time Girl’ and the commemorative goodbye, `Sunset Cowboy’), the set was a tad rushed; a reading of BROWNIE McGHEE & SONNY TERRY’s `Penicillin Blues’ the effective star track; in hindsight, maybe their version of DYLAN’s `Hollis Brown’ could’ve served the album better.
It was too little too late, however, and inevitably, STONE THE CROWS shocked no-one when they called it a day, officially splitting in June ‘73 when the youthful McCulloch joined PAUL McCARTNEY & WINGS. While Allen teamed up with Dutch rock masters, FOCUS, MAGGIE BELL released her debut solo set, the Jerry Wexler-produced “Queen Of The Night” (1974). McCulloch would also succumb to an early death, when on 27th September 1979 he overdosed on heroin; much later, but also of great significance, Jimmy Dewar died of a brain damage in a London hospital on 16th May 2002 after a minor operation went wrong…..by…MC Strong……. 


Rock music is nothing if not cyclical and I am sure that many early seventies musicians stifle a wry smile when they hear the latest generation of wannabe blues rockers, taking their cue from Led Zeppelin and contemporaries. 

Stone The Crows were one of those early seventies bands, a staple at festivals, popular on the student circuit, and managed by Led Zep’s supremo Peter Grant. Their early rise was effectively curtailed after May 1972 when their guitarist Les Harvey was electrocuted on stage in Swansea and sadly became another member of the “27 Club”. 

Angel Air have done much to keep the band’s memory alive, and also highlighting their feisty singer Maggie Bell with several solo albums. The latest reissues feature bonus live tracks, although these have previously been available on the 2-CD set ‘Radio Sessions 1969-72′ culled mainly from the BBC including – on CD1 – ‘Freedom Road’ and ‘Hollis Brown’. 

The eponymous 1970 debut opens with ‘The Touch Of Your Loving Hand’ (also a live bonus on CD2) introducing two of the best blues-rock vocalists this country has produced: Maggie Bell and Jim Dewar. The joint approach on vocals (echoed by the band’s contemporaries Robert Palmer and Elkie Brooks in Vinegar Joe) continues on ‘Raining In Your Heart’ (included on CD2 as a bonus live track). This track cracks along at a fiery pace with some super Les Harvey guitar and John McGinnis’ keyboard interjections. 

Two covers (a Josh White song ‘Blind Man’ and the Beatles’ ‘Fool On The Hill’) give Maggie Bell the chance to stretch out with bluesy accompaniment from Harvey. ‘I Saw America’ filled one side of the original LP and features a number of blues rock to jazz themes with McGinnis’ keys and Harvey’s guitar to the fore. In places, they sound like The Doors at their moody best, with Harvey’s input always tastefully economical, much like Robby Kreiger. **** 

That debut album was followed up within a year by Ode To John Law which built upon their ballsy blues rock calling card. Check out the opener ‘Sad Mary’, and ‘Love’ with its insistent and infectious riff whilst Curtis Mayfield’s ‘Danger Zone’ highlights Maggie Bell’s slow blues. With Jimmy Dewar providing bass and vocals (replaced by Steve Thompson in 1972), ex-John Mayall and future-Focus Colin Allen on drums, this band was a veritable “supergroup” at the time with, potentially, a great future. **** 

Hopefully these reissues will be followed by the re-packaging of their later albums and a reappraisal of both the band and Maggie Bell’s subsequent career. Although she semi-retired to Holland in the eighties – “with a husband and a dog” – in the last decade she has returned to Blighty and performed with several artists including long-time musical journeyman Colin Allen. She still performs regularly in Europe and the UK.....Review by David Randall.....~ 


Long out of print on CD, the first two releases from Scottish blues rock act Stone the Crows, their 1970 debut Stone the Crows and the 1971 follow-up Ode to John Law, are both included here on this glorious 2CD reissue courtesy of the fine folks at Angel Air Records. Featuring the supreme vocal talents of one Maggie Bell, the band also included bassist/vocalist James Dewar (soon to join Robin Trower's band), guitar virtuoso Leslie Harvey (brother of Alex), drummer Colin Allen, and keyboard player John McGinnis. Co-managed by Peter Grant (who of course also managed Led Zeppelin), Stone the Crows generated a lot of buzz but unfortunately never gained the international fame many of their peers received, but their mastery of emotional blues rock is firmly evident on these first two albums. 

The self-titled release contains a wealth of sizzling tunes, including the classic "The Touch of Your Loving Hand", which features both Bell & Dewar trading off some amazing vocal passages over lazy rhythms and smoky organ. "Raining In Your Heart" and "Blind Man" both impress mightily, the former a rumbling rocker with sizzling guitar licks and fiery dual vocals, and the latter home to some wonderful acoustic work from Harvey. Included are two live bonus tracks, the raucous "Freedom Road" and a mysterious take on "Hollis Brown", complete with Bell's swooning vocal delivery. Fans of Janis Joplin would be well advised to investigate this incredible singer. Over on Ode to John Law, the instrumental talents of the band seem to be even more at the forefront. Both "Sad Mary" and "Friend" are highlighted by tasty McGinnis organ and sizzling wah-wah guitar lines from Harvey, and "Things Are Getting Better" again show what an underrated duo both McGinnis & Harvey are. "Love" is a memorable blues number with heartfelt vocals, and that commanding Hammond organ roars back for the stunning title track, a must hear for any fan of Deep Purple with its guitar & organ riffs. "Danger Zone" again sees the smoldering organ percolating under Bell's bluesy vocal, a killer slow blues tune that is also noteworthy for a furious guitar solo from Mr. Harvey. 

The band would survive the electrocution death of their guitarist Harvey (during a concert no less) and go on to record two more albums before calling it a day. Those albums are a story for another day, but here you have the important beginnings of one of the most underrated blues rock acts of the early 1970s...sea of tranquility....~ 


Stone the Crows was a tough-luck, working class, progressive soul band that came out of the pubs of Scotland in the early '70s. They had everything going for them at the start: not one, but two gritty singers, a talented guitarist, a rhythm section that had played with John Mayall, and the name recognition of having Led Zeppelin manager Peter Grant as their producer. Despite favorable reviews by the critics, however, they never managed to sell their hybridized soul music to a large audience. In addition, they lost two of their key members early on, one of whom was tragically electrocuted, and the group broke up after four albums. 

Their biggest contribution to rock was the immense vocal talent of one Maggie Bell. Winner of several Top Girl Singer awards in Britain, Bell had a raunchy, gutbucket voice that, although it fell short of the naked emotion and range of Janis Joplin's, came probably closer to her style than any other female singer. She first attracted notice when she jumped up on stage at a show in Glasgow to wail with Alex Harvey of the Sensational Alex Harvey Band. Impressed by her talent (and audacity), Harvey hooked her up with his guitar-playing younger brother Les, then fronting a local band called the Kinning Park Ramblers. After playing army bases in Europe for several years as Power, Bell, Harvey, bassist Jim Dewar, keyboardist Jon McGinnis, and drummer Colin Allen (who had played with future bass player Steve Thompson in John Mayall's band), came to the attention of Peter Grant and they changed their name to Stone the Crows, which supposedly is a Scottish variation of "the hell with it." 

Both of their first two albums received good reviews upon release, but sold very meagerly. Then bassist/vocalist Jim Dewar quit the band to join Robin Trower's fledgling group, to be replaced by the non-singing Steve Thompson. Shortly after releasing Teenage Licks, guitarist Les Harvey was electrocuted onstage during a gig at Swansea University. This appeared to end the band, but they carried on, recruiting young Jimmy McCulloch from Thunderclap Newman and released "'Ontinuous Performance." Although the rock press lauded the singing of Bell, her group couldn't seem to emerge from the shadows and they broke up after this last album, with McCulloch flying away to join Paul McCartney in Wings. ~ Peter Kurtz....~


Bio
Taking their moniker from a exclamatory term used for the meaning of shock and awe, STONE THE CROWS were the product of several years jamming around the toilet circuit as 60s covers band, Power. Starring two lead vocalists, one of them MAGGIE BELL (touted as Scotland’s answer to JANIS JOPLIN); the other singer/bassist James Dewar, the blues-driven rock quintet looked an ominous project until an astounding LED ZEPPELIN manager Peter Grant took them under his wing; they inked a global deal with Polydor Records.
Known as much for Maggie’s raucous vocal gymnastics, as for the untimely and tragic death in May ‘72 of one of its core members, guitarist Les Harvey, Glasgow’s STONE THE CROWS were the buzz around the city when they formed in 1969. So, with a line-up that comprised Bell, Dewar, Harvey, plus John McGinnis (keyboards) and Englishman Colin Allen (drums) – the latter from JOHN MAYALL’S BLUESBREAKERS, the aforementioned Grant and sidekick Mark London worked on producing an album to equal the group’s electrifying live shows. Bell and her organic, bluesy vocals was an essential ingredient in the band’s soulful rock stew.
The eponymous STONE THE CROWS (1970) {*6} was a sprawling mess of an album, toing and froing (and indeed crowing) from one direction to another: psychedelic blues, progressive soul and hard-rock – but somehow the epic, side-long `I Saw America’, seemed to gel beyond its grandiose self-indulgence. On the flip, however, the Dewar/Harvey-authored `The Touch Of Your Hand’ and `Raining In Your Heart’ (Dewar almost a match for RAY CHARLES or JOE COCKER), were overshadowed by the JOPLIN-esque screeches of BELL on covers of JOSH WHITE’s `Blind Man’ and The BEATLES’ `Fool On The Hill’.
With much the same formula as its predecessor (although McGinnis was afforded three compositions), sophomore set ODE TO JOHN LAW (1970) {*6} missed the boat once again. Despite the encouraging reception for `Sad Mary’ and `Love 74’, Allen and Harvey’s funky `Mad Dogs And Englishmen’ (not the Noel Coward dirge) and a cover of Percy Mayfield’s `Danger Zone’, fell short of their earlier promise; Dewar seemed almost relegated to backing singer. It was then no surprise that McGinnis, then Dewar, took flight, the latter leaving his musical imprint as lead singer with the short-lived Jude and, in turn, ROBIN TROWER’s band.
Fresh recruits Ronnie Leahy (from WHITE TRASH) and Steve Thompson were on board for the recording of TEENAGE LICKS (1972) {*7}, a record which seemed certain to furnish STC with the fruits (at least in terms of critical favour) they deserved. Bell, Harvey and the group (augmented on a few tracks by GONG’s Daevid Allen) were now firing on all cylinders, breaking free from their blues shackles, co-writing beefy ballads such as `Big Jim Salter’, `I May Be Right, I May Be Wrong’ and `Mr. Wizard’. Of course, there were cover placements in an unrecognisable DYLAN re-vamp of `Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right’, and blink-or-you’ll-miss-it Celtic/trad-folk ditty, `Ailen Mochree’.
But just when things looked on the upsurge, the group’s momentum stopped in its tracks following the electrocution of Les Harvey during a live performance at Swansea University on 3rd May that year. Seasoned campaigner Jimmy McCulloch (ex-THUNDERCLAP NEWMAN) stepped in on short notice to finish off the sessions for ONTINUOUS PERFORMANCE (1972) {*5}, an album that finally saw STONE THE CROWS cracking the Top 40. Still showcasing the dexterity and talent of Harvey on all but two tracks (`Good Time Girl’ and the commemorative goodbye, `Sunset Cowboy’), the set was a tad rushed; a reading of BROWNIE McGHEE & SONNY TERRY’s `Penicillin Blues’ the effective star track; in hindsight, maybe their version of DYLAN’s `Hollis Brown’ could’ve served the album better.
It was too little too late, however, and inevitably, STONE THE CROWS shocked no-one when they called it a day, officially splitting in June ‘73 when the youthful McCulloch joined PAUL McCARTNEY & WINGS. While Allen teamed up with Dutch rock masters, FOCUS, MAGGIE BELL released her debut solo set, the Jerry Wexler-produced “Queen Of The Night” (1974). McCulloch would also succumb to an early death, when on 27th September 1979 he overdosed on heroin; much later, but also of great significance, Jimmy Dewar died of a brain damage in a London hospital on 16th May 2002 after a minor operation went wrong....MC Strong.....~


The eponymous debut opens with a blues belter featuring two of the best blues-rock vocalists this country has produced: Maggie Bell and Jim Dewar. 

The joint approach on vocals (echoed by the band's contemporaries Robert Palmer and Elkie Brooks in Vinegar Joe) continues on 'Raining In Your Heart'. This track cracks along at a fiery pace with some super Les Harvey guitar and John McGinnis' keyboard interjections. 

Two covers (a Josh White song 'Blind Man' and the Beatles' 'Fool On The Hill') give Maggie Bell the chance to stretch out with bluesy accompaniment from Harvey. 'I Saw America' filled one side of the original LP and features a number of blues rock to jazz themes with McGinnis' keys and Harvey's guitar to the fore. In places, they sound like The Doors at their moody best, with Harvey's input always tastefully economical, much like Robby Kreiger. 

When you consider that Stone The Crows also had Colin Allen on drums (ex-John Mayall, later with Focus) this was a veritable 'supergroup' at the time. The band were a major draw on the live circuit in the UK but never achieved wider success.... by David Randall.....~ 



Line Up

Bass, Vocals – Jim Dewar
Drums, Percussion – Colin Allen
Guitar – Les Harvey
Organ, Piano – John McGinnis
Vocals – Maggie Bell 

Tracks:

01. The Touch Of Your Loving Hand 6:01
02. Raining In Your Heart 5:06
03. Blind Man 5:09
04. Fool On The Hill 4:07
05. I Saw America 18:21








watch…
Maggie Bell (with Jimmy Page) “"Suicide Sal” 1975 UK Blues Rock Classic Rock
https://johnkatsmc5.blogspot.com/2017/11/maggie-bell-with-jimmy-page-suicide-sal.html



watch
 Maggie Bell “Queen of the night” 1974 UK Blues Rock

https://johnkatsmc5.blogspot.com/2016/06/maggie-bell-queen-of-night-us-promo.html

watch
Stone The Crows  " BBC Radio 1 - Live in Concert 1971-1972" 1998 UK Prog Blues Rock (bootleg)
https://johnkatsmc5.blogspot.com/2018/10/stone-crows-bbc-radio-1-live-in-concert.html



watch
Stone The Crows  “Radio Sessions 1969-1972″  2009 2 LP`s & 2 CD`s  UK Prog Blues Rock (bootleg)

watch
Maggie Bell “Live at The Rainbow” 1974 UK Blues Rock


watch.....
Stone The Crows “Teenage Licks” 1971
https://johnkatsmc5.blogspot.gr/2016/12/stone-crows-teenage-licks-1971-uk-prog.html



watch
Stone The Crows “Live Crows Montreux ‘72” 2002 UK Blues Rock (bootleg)

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