Tuesday, 15 November 2016

Mighty Baby “Live in the Attic” 1970 release 2001-2009 UK Psych Rock

Mighty Baby.“Live in the Attic” 1970 release 2001-2009 UK Psych Rock 
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Mighty Baby’s music wasn’t extremely similar to the Grateful Dead’s, but there are similarities in how their music is presented and received, albeit on a much, much smaller scale than the Dead’s. Much of Mighty Baby’s material was based around loose, semi-improvisational grooves combining numerous styles; their cult of fans, though far less numerous than the Dead’s, exhibits similar ardor for their heroes; and that passion simply doesn’t translate to many outside of the cult, who are a bit puzzled as to what the fuss is all about. All of the above applies to this extensive (63-minute) CD of previously unreleased material, recorded in 1970 between their two official LP releases. The first three tracks, in decent fidelity, are taken from a live gig in support of Love in March 1970, highlighted by the nearly 15-minute instrumental “Now You See It,” which fuses their love for John Coltrane’s Indian-influenced jazz with more rock-oriented instrumentation and rhythm. In contrast, the two other songs from that concert, “Stone Unhenged” (another instrumental) and “Sweet Mandarin” (which, like all of the songs on this disc, were not included on their pair of official LPs) are run-of-the-mill country-blues-rock – the kind of thing you could imagine an obscure local support band to the Grateful Dead playing in 1970, for instance. The remainder of the CD was cut in the studio soon after the March 1970 concert, and is devoted mostly to the four-part, 40-minute improvised instrumental “Now You Don’t.” This again draws from both the exotic jazz of Coltrane’s final years and the more straightforward power of psychedelic rock, and fairly impressively, rather in the way – as much as some Mighty Baby fans might find the comparison odd or inappropriate – Soft Machine did on their early-‘70s jazz-rock recordings. Closing the set is another cut from those studio sessions, the brief and seemingly incomplete “Winter Passes,” which heads off in another direction, its mellow early-'70s-styled rock with Crosby, Stills & Nash-ish harmonies gliding into an extended, laid-back, instrumental jazzy passage. The extended instrumental pieces far outdistance this CD’s vocal numbers in quality, and partly for that reason, on the whole the disc is erratic enough that it can’t be considered on a par with the albums Mighty Baby officially released at the time. But as none of the songs appear on these albums, and those instrumental numbers in particular show sides of the band not fully displayed on those LPs, this should be considered as a vital missing piece to the Mighty Baby discography by fans of the band, if not quite something that could be considered an actual fully developed, unreleased album. ..~

"live in the attic" was a found tape of a show mighty baby did in 1970, there also is added studio and live material from around that time period. I like the band and remember buying their first lp on vinyl when it came out. also enjoyed the track on the Glastonbury fayre compilation. there have been two live mighty baby releases, both very enjoyable. the band live remind me a lot of the grateful dead. long jams where the band is playing off each other. this live cd has more of an eastern feel to it. some flute is added which takes it into the psychedelic realm for that time. liner notes acknowledge john Coltrane's "india" as a heavy influence. sound quality is very good for it's time. I would put it higher than a "completest" disc. liner notes are from 2008 and an interview with roger powell, the drummer from melody maker in 1969. my favorite tracks are "now you see it" and "now you don't". overall a very enjoyable and pleasant surprise. mighty baby is certainly a talented band that was very diverse in their musical styles....by...Joseph L. Kolb...~ 



This superb late sixties underground band were formed from the remnants of pop/soul band The Action, who were popular around the London mod club circuit and issued five singles on Parlophone, including I'll Keep Holding On and Shadows and Reflections between 1965-67. 
Both Mighty Baby albums are now very rare. The first, in particular, has a definite psychedelic West Coast influence. Both are important progressive releases and Mighty Baby had their own distinctive and imaginative sound. Their music was often a sophisticated interplay between the twin guitars of King and Stone and the woodwind accompaniment of Whiteman. Its influences were wide-ranging from jazz (Egyptian Tomb) through to country rock (I'm From The Country) and Some Way From The Sun, notable for an hypnotic guitar intro. Egyptian Tomb is unquestionably the most inspired moment on their first album - melodic guitar playing set to a jazzy arrangement. 
Alan King later played in Ace whilst Martin Stone (Ex- Savoy Brown Blues band) later fronted Chilli Willi and Red Hot Peppers. Mighty Baby also played on lots of other albums, including Reg King's and others on Head. Evans, Powell and Whiteman were later in Habibiyya. 


Curious phenomenon that Mighty Baby. These ex actions are the object of a discreet but tenacious cult. And not only for the monetary value of their few records. Who panic regularly, although without making more noise than that, the small autistic world of eBay. Their French single reaching for example, when we find it, a price more than rondelet. Sort of posthumous revenge on the total indifference that the general public seems to have built between him and the group. No hairy psyche, no generous blues, smelling beer and sweat, unclassifiable. So definitely unsellable. The brilliant first album, which added jazzy / class elements to West Coast influences, succeeded a second opus, a phlegmatic (and luminous) response to the Grateful Dead ofAmerican Beauty . Then the group burst, and it was necessary, as often, to wait almost twenty years, the wave of reissues to (re) discover. All this was good and good, but a live testimony was missing. To my knowledge, the only excrescence of the genre was on an Italian CD of the second disc, and came from the Glastonbury Festival in 1971. Long improvisation totally twisted, probably emanating from arch-smashed musicians. But Santa Claus is probably capitalist, but he sometimes has good ideas. And our Live In The Atticin the hands, we go through the chilly streets spreading the good word. The, between two shots of Flashball, and three bursts of Tazer, we savored first Mighty Baby, live, opening for Love, in March 1970. Three titles (very good considering the age of the bands) including a long suite ( Now You See It) perfectly illustrates the group's purpose. Time torn from time, probable and acid free wheel of spirits eager to take off. It goes a little in all directions, but with a remarkable propensity to listen to others, before shining oneself. Everything can be vaguely similar to Agitation Free without the ethnic roots, in a lot more barred. Walking in the dark, creating something, and trying to overtake it in the next minute. Very good in any case.The transition with two pieces of country rock spirit, not really original, resonates oddly cons. These are unpretentious, certainly, but without much substance either. Note that we are far from the freezer Eagles and co, anyway. Not so far from the Charlatans. The logic is saved. Let's go to the studio part, around the same time. And at forty minutes (imagine that today) of Now You Do not.Flutes, tablas, oriental groove, the sea is blue, the ideal time to sail. Guidance to stars, only. That farts? Shut up, let yourself go, and savor. All the majesty of the Albatross of Baudelaire, who would have solved his problems of the only possible solution: never to go down again. Fly away from humanity, from its smallness. To be confused in the clouds, sheltered. Worse, give yourself reason to think like that. The weather is very capricious my Captain, we will leave tomorrow. Or later, when the music will be silent once. Great compact mass, these fellows hold us well. And they get along to scramble the tracks, while rolling us in their own flour. We are not really far from Soft Machine now. Frightening ability to stretch the substance again and again, the types of Mighty Baby deserve their medal. At the great mass grave of rock sacrifices, this place we visit blindfolded. Just to forget the way, and see only the necropolis. Jouvence sound, attention you will fall in the well ... With a big smile, just the effort to lean. And it is already (alas) the end with a nice melancholy piece, reinforced by two female singers. Beautiful circular piano theme, the guitar takes over and both go on the road. Towards the sun certainly. The whole is totally out of step with the (poor) standards of today, and thus calls on a public of connoisseurs. As, here is a precious testimony of a tragically unknown formation. And called, alas to stay, one would say. Many musicians of the same generation would like such a pretty wreath at their funeral. ....by...Laurent....~ 


Dating from a period halfway between sessions for the two albums released in ’69 and ’71 respectively, the material included herewith finds Mighty Baby at their most experimental. The opening live tracks (recorded at a gig supporting Love in 1970) are split between a 15 minute jazz-flavoured Eastern-tinged psych jam (Now You See It), and Grateful Dead-like West-Coast grooves (Stone Unhenged, Sweet Mandarin), while the rest of the album comprises Olympic Studio outtakes. 

The title of Now You Don’t (4 parts flowing into each other seamlessly in almost 40 minutes overall!?) suggests that this might as well be an extension of the above mentioned Now You See It, with it’s improvisational Coltrane-influenced content only adding up to the idea, and Winter Passes starts out as an almost conventional eerie pop-psych of the day, before it delves into realms of jazz just as well. 

With Coltrane’s India already in their live set during the late Action days, this wasn’t too much of a surprise, but it’s the forthcoming rootsy, Band-influenced A Jug Of Love, that didn’t really seem as what you’d expect to appear on the horizon.





Previously unreleased material, recorded in 1970 between their two official LP releases. The first three tracks, in decent fidelity, are taken from a live gig in support of Love in March 1970, highlighted by the nearly 15-minute instrumental “Now You See It,” which fuses their love for John Coltrane’s Indian-influenced jazz with more rock-oriented instrumentation and rhythm. In contrast, the two other songs from that concert, “Stone Unhenged” (another instrumental) and “Sweet Mandarin” (which, like all of the songs on this disc, were not included on their pair of official LPs), are run-of-the-mill country-blues-rock – the kind of thing you could imagine an obscure local support band to the Grateful Dead playing in 1970, for instance. The remainder of the CD was cut in the studio soon after the March 1970 concert, and is devoted mostly to the four-part, 40-minute improvised instrumental “Now You Don’t.” This again draws from both the exotic jazz of Coltrane’s final years and the more straightforward power of psychedelic rock, and fairly impressively, rather in the way – as much as some Mighty Baby fans might find the comparison odd or inappropriate – Soft Machine did on their early-1970s jazz-rock recordings. Closing the set is another cut from those studio sessions, the brief and seemingly incomplete “Winter Passes,” which heads off in another direction, its mellow early-'70s-styled rock with Crosby, Stills & Nash-ish harmonies gliding into an extended instrumental laidback jazzy passage. The extended instrumental pieces far outdistance this CD’s vocal numbers in quality, and partly for that reason, on the whole the disc is erratic enough that it can’t be considered on a par with the albums Mighty Baby officially released at the time. But as none of the songs appear on these albums, and those instrumental numbers in particular show sides of the band not fully displayed on those LPs, this should be considered as a vital missing piece to the Mighty Baby discography by fans of the band, if not quite something that could be considered an actual fully developed unreleased albu…by….adamus67 ….~


MightyBaby’s music is the best music in the world, but it’s not a big deal. Much of Mighty Baby’s material is based on loose, semi-improvisational grooves combining various styles; It’s a good thing, but it’s a good thing. “Ardor for her heroes; And that passion simply does not translate to any outside of the cult, which is a bit is puzzled as to what the foot is all about. (63-minute) CD of previously unreleased material, recorded in 1970 between their two official LP releases. The first three tracks, in decent fidelity, are taken from a live gig in support of Love in March 1970, highlighted by the nearly 15-minute instrumental "Now You See It,” which is John Coltrane’s Indian-influenced jazz with More rock-oriented instrumentation and rhythm. In contrast, the two other songs from that concert, “Stone Unhenged” and “Sweet Mandarin,” are run-of -the-mill-country-blues-rock - the kind of thing you could imagine in obscure local support band to the Grateful Dead playing in 1970, for instance. The last thing you want to do is to play the drums, but you will not be able to do it again. “Now You Do not.” If you are looking for a good movie, you can write a review for this movie. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us On their early-'70s jazz-rock recordings. The mellow early-'70s-styled rock with Crosby, Stills & Nash-ish harmonies gliding into an extended , Laid-back, instrumental jazzy passage. The extended instrumental pieces far outdistance this Mighty Baby officially released at the time. But as none of the songs appear on these albums, and those instrumental numbers in particular show, this is a vital missing piece to the Mighty baby discography by fans of the band, if Not quite anything that could be considered an actual fully developed, unreleased album... (by Richie Unterberger, All Music Guide ) …~


MIGHTY BABY Live In The Attic (2009 issue UK 8-track CD album - Mighty Baby are firmly established as one of the best-loved underground bands in British rock history. Combining elements of blues folk jazz and psychedelia their unique brand ofexperimental rock and roll is brilliantly captured on these rare recordings finally given an official release here. Three tracks were captured live at a gig supporting US legends Love in March 1970 while the remainder were taped soon afterwards at Londons Olympic Studios. Complete with a picture booklet containing extensive sleevenotes rare photographs and an introduction from their bassist Michael Evans making it simply essential for all fans of the band.) ...~

Unlike the band's other live album on the Sunbeam label, this has pretty good/good sound. The first three tracks were professionally recorded at Lancaster University in 1970, while the remaining tunes are from Olympic Studios around the same period. The live tracks lack a bit of dynamic range, but otherwise are pretty good. The booklet has a short essay by the band's bassist, Mike Evans, along with a 1969 Melody Maker interview with drummer Roger Powell. Also included are a couple of photos of the band,and an ad from 1969, by the renowned cartoonist/artist R. Crumb-quite a surprise for this Crumb fan-check out his collection of album covers in a recently published collection-pretty cool. 

The Lancaster tracks are long jams inspired by John Coltrane, particularly the composition "India", which heavily influenced the band. The long, swirling passages are explorations in freedom-something a number of bands in both England and the U.S. were exploring during this era. The playing is often reminiscent of the GRATEFUL DEAD, with MIGHTY BABY stretching out each song until they've said what they wanted to say. But if you're looking for extended solos (particularly by guitarist Martin Sharp), this isn't it. The band (Sharp-lead guitar, Alan King-rhythm guitar/vocals, Ian Whiteman-keyboards/sax/flute/vocals, Evans-bass, and Powell-drums) was more about a group sound rather than simply soloing for solos sake. Occasionally you'll hear the keyboards, sax, flute, or guitar step up and play over the band, but not for long. 

The four part "Now You Don't" is about 40 minutes long. The master tape for these tracks comes from an original cassette tape from the studio, so the sound lacks some dynamics, but is otherwise pretty good. Similar to the live tracks, the band is more interested in a group sound on these jams. The playing is more subtle-the acoustic and electric guitars are combined with either keyboards, sax, or flute in a blend of sound. 

The final track, "Winter Passes", is quite different from the rest of the album. The innocent sounding vocals are by a duo from America, Janet and Kathy, who went by the name EMILY MUFF. Nothing is really known about these two, except they seemed to gig with FAMILY on occasion. While a departure from the band's signature sound, this fairly short track is nonetheless an example of that entire period of music. 

If you're a fan of this band or this era of music (like me), this might be something worth your while to check into. There's nothing startling here, no fantastic soloing or dynamics in the band's playing-just MIGHTY BABY doing what they like to do-play. The band's first album will always be their best effort, but this, along with their second album, "A Jug Of Love" are two of a kind. The band's second album has almost always gotten a bad rap, and that's too bad. Their West Coast influenced sound (THE BYRDS, THE FLYING BURRITO BROTHERS, the GRATEFUL DEAD among others) was a real shock to fans expecting something similar to their first album. So if you're a deep fan of lesser known English bands from this era and/or their second album, check this out...by...Stuart Jefferson...~ 



Mighty Baby 

*Mike Evans - Bass 
*Alan King - Acoustic, Electric Guitar, Vocals 
*Roger Powell - Drums, Percussion 
*Martin Stone - Acoustic, Electric Guitar 
*Ian Whiteman - Flute, Keyboards, Saxophone, Vocals 

Tracklist

01 - India [Live 1970] 
02 - Title Unknown [Live 1970] 
03 - India [Live Stdio Version] 
04 - Title Unknown [Live Studio Version] 
05 - Winter Passes [First Studio Take] 
06 - Winter Passes [Second Studio Take] 

1Now You See It 
2Stone Unhenged 
3Sweet Mandarin 
4Now You Don’t (Part 1) 
5Now You Don’t (Part 2) 
6Now You Don’t (Part 3) 
7Now You Don’t (Part 4) 
8Winter Passes 





watch….
Mighty Baby ‎" A Jug Of Love" 1971 second album + “Tasting The Life” Live 1971 CD Sunbeam Records ‎2010 UK Psych Rock 


watch…

Mighty Baby “Mighty Baby” 1969 UK Psych Rock -100 Great Psychedelic Rock Albums (Record Collector) 

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