body{ text-shadow: 0px 0px 4px rgba(150, 150, 150, 1); }

30 Dec 2016

Josefus ‎“Get Off My Case” 1969 US Psych Acid Hard Rock



















Josefus ‎“Get Off My Case” 1969 US Psych Acid Hard Rock 
full
watch interview by psychedelic baby…
Josefus web site…biography & photos
This unique album was recorded by Josefus in 1969 and was never released until the early 80’s when few hundrers copies on vinyl LP were pressed by ‘Epilogue records", on offer is one of them……………. 

Josefus was a band from who have been credited for being “one of the first models for the blunt sound of Texas and .” They were also mentioned in an article in titled, “The Lost Pioneers of Heavy Metal”. noted the group as one of the links between and . 
The cult legend surrounding obscure Texan hard rockers Josefus was established almost entirely by their 1970 album, Dead Man; a self-released rough gem of psychedelic hard rock originally printed in such limited quantities, that even avid collectors were largely unaware that the group had in fact recorded an earlier, never released version of it tentatively entitled: “Get Off My Case”. …………. 

The cult legend surrounding obscure Texan hard rockers Josefus was established almost entirely by their 1970 album, Dead Man; a self-released rough gem of psychedelic hard rock originally printed in such limited quantities that even avid collectors were largely unaware that the group had in fact recorded an earlier, never released version of it tentatively entitled Get Off My Case. Taking place at the same Phoenix, AZ studios, just four months earlier, on December 17 and 18, 1969, at a modest cost of $1,500, the Get Off My Case sessions yielded seven tracks, four of which would eventually find their way, re-recorded, onto the Dead Man LP. None of these – “Crazy Man,” “Country Boy,” “Situation,” and even the epic jam “Dead Man” – differed all that much from their revised, second attempts in terms of structure, but did boast looser executions and rougher production standards, which may actually prove even more appealing to low-fidelity-loving crate-diggers. Among the three cuts left out of the return sessions, both the rambling, unfocused “Get Off My Case,” and the instrumentally inspired, but lyrically fragmented “A Social Song” were, in retrospect, understandable casualties. But the more elaborate, well-constructed “Feelin’ Good” showed great promise in its sunny So-Cal psych intro and subsequent sub-Sabbath riffs, which could have easily been fine-tuned for a second attempt, had the band chosen to reprise it. In sum, these tracks afford an interesting but not quite essential survey of Josefus’ earliest material that only diehards might truly appreciate. As for the history that surrounded it: after the Get Off My Case sessions wrapped, band manager Jim Musil took its tapes to L.A. and, still insisting on touting the band by the more provocative name, “Come”, instead of their preferred Josefus, and proceeded to shop them to record companies, all to no avail. By March, he received a letter from the group requesting that their relationship be severed, as Josefus was already re-recording the album for its eventual release as Dead Man, leaving Get Off My Case to vanish into oblivion, until being tagged onto Dead Man CD reissues of the late '90s…. by Eduardo Rivadavia….allmusic…… 

A collection of mat'l recorded in 1969, prior to their signature album “Dead Man”. Only three previously unavailable songs are on here, the remainder are earlier, alternatives of tracks that appeared on the next album. The version of “Dead Man” that appears here may just be superior to the title track of the album, depending on your taste. But either way, just being in contention for such honors speaks volumes about it’s quality. The album is mostly Texas style hard rock, with strong psych influences, especially on the epic. Though few would consider the album “Dead Man” “polished”, this one actually makes that one seem so. Nonetheless, it’s appeal to fans of the band should be unquestionable. Grades - 1 A, 4 B+’s, and 2 B’s, consistently great. Comes with a booklet detailing their history..by…tymeshifter ………. 
In 1979 Bailey and Mitchell briefly reformed the band. The reunion lasted long enough to release a pair of obscure singles (“Hard Luck” b/w “On Account of You” and “Let Me Move You” b/w “Big Time Loser”). 

Released by the small Washington-based Epilogue label, “Get Off of My Case” rounded up a couple of early 1969 pre-Josefus Come efforts, along with alternative versions of “Crazy Man”, an extended “Dead Man” (probably the highlight) and “Situation”. What can you say about the tunes? If you liked their earlier stuff, than pseudo-Zepplin sludge metal like “A Social Song” and “Feelin’ Good” will certainly appeal to you. To our ears it isn’t bad, but ya’ have to be in the right mood. Again, the guitar effects heavy “Dead Man” provides the standout track. Original copies of the LP included a multi-page insert containing a various newspaper clippings and a brief 1985 Allan Vorda interview with Bailey and Turner. …by…..RDTEN1 ………. 

Pete Bailey (vocals, harp) 
Dave Mitchell (guitar) 
Douglas “Doug” Tull (drums) 
Ray Turner (bass) 

Tracklist 
A1 Crazy Man
A2 Country Boy
A3 Get Off My Case
A4 A Social Song
A5 Fellin’ Good
B1 Situation
B2 Dead Man 



johnkatsmc5, welcome music..