body{ text-shadow: 0px 0px 4px rgba(150, 150, 150, 1); }

Saturday, 18 June 2016

Writing On The Wall “Cracks in the Illusion of Life” 1995 Tenth Planet Label Compilation rarities from 1967-73 UK Psych Heavy Prog










Writing On The Wall “Cracks in the Illusion of Life” 1995 Tenth Planet Label Compilation rarities from 1967-73 Limited Edition in 1000 copies UK Psych Heavy Prog.

full

http://www.dailymotion.com/playlist/x2jzve_John_Dug_writing-on-the-wall-cracks-in-the-illusion-of-life/1#video=xyi6w0

Rare unreleased psychedelic material by this great Scottish band who were regulars at Middle Earth etc in the ‘60s. Subtitled 'A History Of Writing On The Wall’, this 1995 release is a great retrospective compilation covering the career of this late 60’s to early 70’s band from Edinburgh who released a true prog classic with 1969’s 'The Power Of The Picts’. Stoned psychedelic rock with a twisted dark side.

Released on a beautiful gatefold sleeve TENTH PLANET RECORDS (UK TP017) in 1995 and is strictly limited to 1000 handnumbered copies,as well as is available Re-issue CD 2002 Progressive Line 24 BIT Digitally Remastered.

This excellent collection is a history of the band 11 tracks of acid may hem collected from the period 1967-1973 contains some previously unreleased recordings. Of their retrospective albums, Cracks In The Illusion Of Life contains both sides of a 1967 45, 'Words And Music’ / 'Peter Gunn’, issued originally as The Jury. Also featured are two promising pop-psych tracks from 1968; 'Felicity Jane’ and 'Flight Of The Mind’ plus the more mainstream 'Katie’s Been Gone’. From 1972 there’s the keyboard-orientated’ Fishers Of Men’. . 






Personnel:
Willy Finlayson - Guitar
Alby Greenhalgh - Wind
Jimmy Hush - Drums
Linnie Patterson - Vocals
Bill Scott - Keyboards
Jake Scott - Bass
Robert Smith - Guitar

1. Words and Music 02:18
2. Peter Gunn 02:51
3. Felicity Jane 03:17
4. Flight of the Mind 03:35
5. Katie’s Been Gone 02:38
6. Fishers of Men 06:28
7. Buffalo 06:54
8. Nobody Knows 03:58
9. Bellyful of Rock 05:37
10. Man of Renown 03:28
11. Tripsy Lady 04:03

Albums:

The Power Of The Picts (Middle Earth MDLS 303) 1969, (Vogue SLVXME 430 - France) 1969, reissue: Selector (Germany), Repertoire (Germany, 1992) with bonus: "Child On A Crossing"
CD: Repertoire REP 4854, 2000; ORK ORKD 2 (2CD) 2007

Rarities From The Middle Earth (Pie & Mash PAM 003) 1995 ltd.ed. vinyl - studio & live material

Cracks In The Illusion Of Life (Tenth Planet TP 017) 1995 - rarities from 1967-73
CD: Progressive Line PL 552, 2002

Burghley Road (Tenth Planet TP 018) 1996 - Kentish Town basement recordings from 1972
CD: Progressive Line PL 553, 2002

45s:

Child On A Crossing/Lucifer Corpus (Middle Earth MDS 101) 1969
Man Of Renown/Buffalo (Pye 7N 45251) 197

Chimera “Chimera” UK Acid Folk,Baroque Psychedelia 1969-70


Chimera “ Chimera” UK Acid Folk/Baroque Psychedelia 1969-70

full vk

https://vk.com/wall312142499_3731

Legendary in collector circles for years, this magnificent unreleased album from the late ‘60s UK acid folk/psych scene is now available on CD for the first time, with a cache of pre-LP sessions bonus tracks making their debut in any format. Led by a couple of Swinging London pop groupies, Chimera recorded their album for Morgan Blue Town, but it was never released because of an accident to the lead singer that would have prevented her from promoting it. The sessions were produced by the group’s manager, Pink Floyd’s Nick Mason - both he and Floyd keyboardist Rick Wright make cameo instrumental appearances, while other names involved include the Smoke’s Mal Luker, who plays guitar and produces the earlier tracks, future Fleetwood Mac guitarist Bob Weston, and the Orange Bicycle’s Wil Malone, who arranges all the songs. Detailed booklet tells the full Chimera story (and what a story it is!) with quotes and photos. 
Legendary lost masterpiece of late 60s acid folk/baroque psychedelia, the unreleased 1969 album by Chimera – featuring future Fleetwood Mac guitarist Bob Weston – was partly produced by Pink Floyd drummer Nick Mason who, like Rick Wright, makes a cameo appearance. First released a couple of years ago in vinyl-only format, this first-ever CD issue adds an extra eight previously-unheard pre-album demos to come up with the definitive Chimera anthology. 12 page booklet with lots of photos and the full story behind the band’s astonishing adventures in Swinging London. Reviewed by Paul Martin: .... ~
Chimera were basically two young girls Francesca Garnett and Lisa Bankoff accompanied by an ever changing line up of musicians (all of them good). The album presented here is mastered from a cassette tape (though you’d never know it to hear it) which was all that was left of these sessions. A projected then abandoned album, the recordings ended up as a miscellaneous collection of sessions partly due to their label, Morgan Bluetown’s, dithering which led to people leaving the group or becoming disinterested. Pink Floyd’s Nick Mason produced all of these sessions and Rick Wright plays harpsichord on 'Lady With The Bullets In Her Hair’, the whole (and sometimes harrowing) story of which can be found in the liner notes and in more depth and context in Francesca and Lisa’s self-published book 'Making It: Famous Names And Silly Girls’.
What we have as the musical legacy is a game of two halves. Half, or perhaps slightly more, of the songs are real vehicles for the girls voices (all the songs are originals). These are acid-folk of the very first order and any Mellow Candle fans for instance will want this album and many of the numbers would have fitted deftly in to 'The Wicker Man’ film soundtrack. Francesca and Lisa’s voices on album opener, 'Come Into The Garden’ suddenly emerge out of a swirling introduction and proceed to take off like two uncaged birds soaring towards the sun. Backed by busy drums, this mid paced number (as most of these numbers are and thus allowing both singers and musicians to stretch out) is a jaw dropper for anyone attuned to an acid-folk vibe. It should be said that none of the songs on this album have a predictable or conventional pattern to them. They are beautifully syncopated affairs with interesting vocal patterns lilting bass lines etc., in fact 'progressive’ in the very best sense of that often abused word, with rhythms rising seemingly from nowhere and winding back down again.
The Grail’ is brooding, full of foreboding and warning with great keyboards in an almost improvised rhythm, whilst 'Sad Song For Winter’ is a beautiful solo vocal from Lisa accompanied by acoustic guitar and harpsichord which produces a surprisingly full sound for such spartan instrumentation. 'Lady With The Bullets In Her Hair’ features Rick Wright on harpsichord (or Spinet or some such) and is a beautiful pastoral and orchestrated number (Cellos, wood wind and a touch of brass) with acoustic guitar. Similarly 'Morning Sounds’ takes us in the same direction. 'Song In E’ is also a beautiful light number featuring acoustic guitar and tablas with a dual female vocal, soft and flowing, a nice tune with good changes.
The other dimension of the album are those songs which feature the band more strongly. Most famously, or at least the track most widely heard by anyone that is part of this aspect is 'Peru’ with its swooping, loping bass line and compulsively addictive rhythm. In similar style is 'Mary’s Mystery’ which has a phased guitar part and a long instrumental passage which rises to a crescendo. The band dominated numbers can best be described as Fairport Convention meets Little Feet as they have a blend of blues-funk and folk rock in them. Both 'Black Hat Babe’ and 'Episode At Telegraph Hill’ (which also includes some John Mayall-like guitar work lacing its way throughout the number) are other examples of this style.
All songs on this album are instrumentally very strong and seem to go out of their way to find counter rhythms rather than plump for the obvious, both instrumentally and vocally. The whole project was far more worthy than the way it got treated, and it is a pleasure to have it here now. I could listen to this all day and still want more. It is slated for release on CD by Sanctuary who own the Morgan Bluetown catalogue as well, and if there is even just one extra track not on the LP, I’ll be bagging that as well! Acid-folkers, dreamers and seekers after musical cerebral accompaniment should all tap into Chimera, this albeit posthumous release deserves a much wider audience. ...~
It all started around 1963 when two Beatles groupies, Lisa Bankoff (piano) and Francesca Garnett (vocals) decided to start writing their own songs. After having a tape refused by EMI in 1965, they went to Rome where both their mothers were living. There they recorded a tape of own songs but it remained into a cassette until they came back to UK in 1967.
It was in Rome, in May 1968, that they had the opportunity to approach Nick Mason while the Pink Floyd were taking part to a festival. Back to UK, Nick Mason offered to become their manager with David Gilmour as producer. With Nick Mason as manager the two girls signed off a contract with Blue Morgan and assembled a band including Ian Milne on keyboards and two unknown musicians.
The band didn't last long so they had to hire the instrumentist through melody maker. After some changes in the lineup, when they were recording the album, the label closed down. Nick Mason tried a deal with Atlantic, but the band rapidly disbanded.
Lisa Bankoff wrote: The project fell to pieces mainly because I had a car accident shortly after the recordings were finished and couldn't walk for a couple of years. Our producer was called Mal Luker. Almost all of those musicians appear in the album lineup: MAL LUKER (The Smoke) who is currently a successful producer in films industry (OST of Pirates of Caribbean), the bassist NICK SOUTH (Alexis Korner), the guitarist BOB WESTON, the drummer Roy Temro and the appearance of NICK MASON and RICK WRIGHT. Atlantic declined its interest, then later Bob Weston joined the Fleetwood Mac.
There was a brief reunion in 1975 but nothing more happened until 1980 when ten survived tracks were discovered in the Morgan's archives during a project for reissues. The tape was remastered from a cassette copy, but it remained in the archives only to be rediscovered in 2001, year of the final release of their album. A couple of tracks feature Nick Mason and Rick Wright. The album was released 32 years after being recorded. All their music, except those 10 tracks seemed lost forever, but 9 more tracks have been resumed somewhere and included in a later edition of the album. It's not official, but it looks like one of the reasons why the tracks remained unreleased was that Nick Mason was owning the rights and didn't allow the material to be published. This is what a Lisa's friend says. FRANCESCA and LISA wrote a book about their life in London during the late '60s / early '70s called Making It! Famous Names and Silly Girls. A copy is in the Australian National Library (Lisa moved to Perth). ROY TEMRO and LISA BANKOFF are now dead (RIP).
The music of Chimera is influenced by the British psychedelia of late 60s with folky elements mainly in the high-pitch voices and the use of acoustic guitars. With a bit more luck, they could have been predecessors to bands like Fairport Convention...~
The amazing story of this album begins in 1969 just to be relaeased 32 years after the end of recordings. Who is curious to know why, can give a read to the band's bio. The ten tracks, all written by Lisa Bankoff, are a mix of British psychedelia with folk elements that add a touch of "hippyness".
Most of the tracks were produced by Nick Mason, and he and Richard Wright appear on two tracks, but this is no more than a curiosity for Pink Floyd's completionists. Only "Lady with Bullets in Her Hair" is floydian enough to be compared. Lisa's music is more close to the athmospheres of Fairport Convention or to the early Renaissance.
The quality is not perfect because the original masters are lost and the tracks are copied from a tape, but not perfect doesn't mean poor. It's better than many of its contemporary productions, anyway.
This is an important document of that period, and it's a pity that Lisa and Francesca didn't have the possibility to continue making music as they were very talented.
I won't go track by track. I want to leave you the possibility to discover it on your own.
Looking at its absolute value and taking into account that it's just the printout of 10 spare recordings, it should be 3 stars, but if you think to all the things that happened behind it has more value.
Lisa lived enough to see it released, the drummer Roy Temro didn't. Also Rick Wright is no longer here. I rate it 4 stars as a small compensation to the injustice that was suffered by both the band and the album....by octopus-4 .....

"Legendary lost masterpiece of late '60s acid folk/baroque psychedelia, the unreleased 1969 album by Chimera -- featuring future Fleetwood Mac guitarist Bob Weston -- was partly produced by Pink Floyd drummer Nick Mason who, like Rick Wright, makes a cameo appearance. First released a few years ago in vinyl-only format, this first-ever CD issue adds an extra eight pre-album demos to provide the definitive Chimera anthology. 12-page booklet with lots of photos and the full story behind the band's astonishing adventures in Swinging London." 2004 release. 




First ever release of this legendary masterpiece of late 60's UK ACID-FOLK rock psychedelia, recorded for the cult Morgan Blue Town label and produced by Pink Floyd's Nick Mason who, together with Floyd keyboard player Rick Wright, also makes a appearance on the album. Also featuring SMOKE guitarist Mal Luker, ORANGE BICYCLE leader Will Malone and future Fleetwood Mac guitarist Rob Weston. This CD adds 8 previously unheard pre-album demos and comes with a 12 booklet with the band's full story......~ 




Personel: 
Lisa Bankoff - guitar (tracks 2,3,9) and vocals on all tracks 
Francesca Garnett - vocals on all tracks except “Sad Song For Winter” 
Mal Luker - guitar and keyboards on “Sad Song For Winter” 
Bob Weston - guitar on tracks marked * 
Nick South - bass on tracks marked * 
Roy Temro - drums on “Mary’s Mystery” 
Nick Mason - drums on “The Grail” 
Rick Wright - keyboards on “Lady With Bullets In Her Hair” 
Ian Milne - keyboards on “The Grail” 

1. Come Into The Garden* 
Interlude #1 
2. The Grail 
Interlude #2 
3. Sad Song For Winter 
Interlude #3 
4. Mary’s Mystry* 
5. Lady With Bullets In Her Hair 
6. Black Hat Babe* 
7. Song In E* 
8. Episode At Telegraph Hill* 
9. Morning Sounds 
10. Peru* 

All tracks written by Lisa Bankoff 
Tracks recorded 1969 except* 1970 

Produced by Mal Luker 
except* produced by Nick Mason 
Orchestral arrangements by Wil Malone 

watch....
Chimera “Holy Grail” 1970 UK Psych Folk Rock released 2017 Remastered from original tapes with 11 previously unreleased bonus track second album


Bambi Fossati & Garybaldi “Blokko 45” 1996 Italian Heavy Prog


Bambi Fossati & Garybaldi “Blokko 45” 1996 Italian Heavy Prog

full

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uyjdpUT6uXY&list=PL6755C818AFBDE6B1

Bambi Fossati: guitars, vocals 
Angelo Traverso: bass 
Maurizio Cassinelli: drums 

Tracklist: 
01. Cento Volte 
02. Scazzo Matto 
03. Calda Lava 
04. Tuxedo 
05. Soffitto Blu 
06. Palazzo Pazzo 
07. Ali 
08. Tecno FYB 
09. Peace Pipe 
10. Gud Nait 

Fantasy "Paint A Picture" 1973 + "Beyond The Beyond" 1974 + "Vivariatum" 1970-76 UK Prog Symphonic


Fantasy "Paint A Picture" 1973 first album

full vk

https://vk.com/wall312142499_8455

https://vk.com/id312142499?z=audio_playlist-154144657_408
Fantasy "Beyond The Beyond" 1974 second album 
Fantasy "Reality"1973 {HQ} UK 
full vk
Fantasy "Vivariatum" 1970-76  third album 

full vk

The story of this band started at the Chapel Farm, a farmhouse near Gravesend (Kent) were the band had their first rehearsals. It was the family home of singer Paul Petley, other musicians were Geoff Whitehorn (electric guitar), Paul Lawrence (acoustic guitar/vocals), David Metcalfe (keyboards), David Read (bass guitar) and Brian Chatham (drums), later replaced by John Webster. The lead guitar was by the promising Bob Vann but he died in a car accident, he was replaced by Pete James. The new line-up FANTASY sent a demo tape to the label Decca and changed their name in FIREQUEEN. But Polydor was also interested and they pursuaded the band to sign for them. Again the band decided to change their name, it became FANTASY, a name that fitted more to the style and flavour of the music. The debut album was called “Paint A Picture” and released in ‘73….~


Along with Spring and Cressida, Fantasy was one of the classic bands in the soft, symphonic and melodic vein of early British progressive rock. “Paint…” was unfortunately the only album they managed to get out while they still existed, but in return, the whole album is a true delight! Very beautiful, melodic and atmospheric with great songwriting from the first to the last track. Personally I like the band best when they were at their most mellow, and tracks like “Icy River”, “Gnome Song”, “The Award” and the title-track are among my favourites. “Politely Insane” is probably the best of the more uptempo tracks, with its catchy melody and great brass-arrangement. Both the atmosphere, sound and lyrics of the last track, “Silent Mime”, reminds me actually quite a lot of the title track from Novalis’ “Banished Bridge”. Vocals are soft and pleasant with lots of good harmonies. Arrangements are tasty with lots of atmospheric organ, Mellotron and guitar. Overall, this is classic stuff…. ~



Fantasy "Paint A Picture" 1973 first lp Uk Prog Rock 

Line-up / Musicians 

- Paul Lawrence / 12 string guitar, vocals 
- David Read / bass, vocals 
- David Metcalfe / keyboards, vocals 
- Peter James / lead guitar, vocals 
- Jon Webster / percussion, vocals 

Songs / Tracks Listing 

1. Paint A Picture (5:24) 
2. Circus (6:18) 
3. The Award (4:52) 
4. Politely Insane (3:27) 
5. Widow (2:12) 
6. Icy River (5:53) 
7. Thank Christ (4:06) 
8. Young Man’s Fortune (3:41) 
9. Gnome Song (4:19) 
10. Silent Mine (4:3 

Fantasy, origianlly known as Chapel Farm, were an odd sort of band, being rather late-psych/proto-proggish in 1973, by which time most bands had moved on to pastures new. For all that, Paint a Picture (the only record released in their lifetime) is a good album, just not the classic that it’s sometimes made out to be. The songwriting’s excellent, slightly reminiscent of the late-psych style that Gracious did so well, with strong melodies and coherent song structures to the fore, particularly on the title track. Most of the album’s keyboard work, from David Metcalfe, is either Hammond or Farfisa organ, plus bits of synth. To be honest, there’s nothing like as much Mellotron as has often been claimed, with only (to my ears, anyway) three tracks on the album, only two of which make particularly good use of the instrument. Paint A Picture itself, as well as being a gorgeous song, builds up to a 'Tron strings-heavy part towards the end, and Gnome Song has some excellent string and flute parts, although Thank Christ is very low-key on the 'Tron front. 
After recording an unreleased second album, the band hung around for another few years until quietly slipping away as punk hit in '77. That would’ve been it for Fantasy, if it hadn’t have been for Pete Sarfas at the Audio Archives label, who dug up those unreleased tapes, releasing them as Beyond the Beyond in 1992. Well, would you believe it? It’s brilliant. The songwriting’s easily the equal of that on their debut, while their sound had progressed towards a slightly more 'rock’ direction, and there’s more Mellotron, although not on possibly the album’s best track, Afterthought, which ends with a fantastic classical adaptation, more than the equal of many by better-known bands. The title track waits until the chorus to bring in the 'Tron strings, to incredible effect, whereas Alanderie is several minutes in before any appears. Metcalfe uses choirs on this track, incidentally, proving M400 ownership (I had some strange idea at some point that they used a Mark II). The other 'Tron tracks make good use of the instrument, though not in quite the same league as these two, but all in all, an excellent album on every front. Top marks Audio Archives. ~

In '94, Audio Archives put out another Fantasy album, Vivariatum (***½), made up of early- and late-period demos, plus a b-side from the Paint a Picture sessions, I Was Once Aware. The CD is, sadly, entirely 'Tron-free, but the story doesn’t end there. After both CDs sold out, most of the best tracks from Vivariatum, irritatingly minus the b-side, were added to the Beyond the Beyond tracks, along with a previously-unavailable demo, as Beyond the Beyond Plus… If only I Was Once Aware was on the disc, it would be the ideal complement to Paint a Picture, as the later tracks really aren’t worth the effort. To add to the confusion, Lake Eerie Records, based in Illinois, reissued Paint a Picture, adding most of Beyond the Beyond as bonus tracks, though not I Was Once Aware. Again. 
So; Paint a Picture’s good, with a little 'Tron. Beyond the Beyond (Plus…) is excellent, with loads of 'Tron, and at least both are now easily available....~

Before reading my short review of this album, I have to admit being a bit biased. I really love this style of early English progressive rock. Although the musicians are not virtuosos, and the tracks are not terribly complex the music here is so warm, sincere, and melodic that you immediately fall for the colorful sounds coming out of your speakers. 1973's "Paint A Picture" is FANTASY's only official release (the second album, which was rejected by Polydor in the 70s, was released on CD in 1992). Some of the music on "Paint A Picture" reminds me of David BOWIE's "Space Oddity". Not that the tracks here sound like BOWIE's classic song, but the orchestration is very similar. Especially with the use of acoustic guitar, and mellotron. The band also knew when to pick up the pace in a song with an aggressive instrumental section or two, but the overall atmosphere is relaxed. This classic will appeal to fans of SPRING, EARTH AND FIRE, PENTACLE, and PFM's "Per Un Amico"......by Steve Hegede .....~
Paint a Picture" was the debut album release by England's FANTASY and represents a lovely early work of art. This 5 piece English band play a highly symphonic styled melodic progressive rock with some lovely deep mellotron and keyboards. FANTASYy were known as a song based band and this album showcases their lyrical approach to symphonic music. Instrumentally these guys were amazing with some lovely bass, guitar and drum interplay all put to the expressive and flowing vocals. Hard to exactly peg down but one might draw some similarities to the approach of STARCASTEL, Alan PARSONS PROJECT (ie. Politely Insane) GENESIS and even BARCLAY JAMES & HARVEST. Their sound is full and rich with lots of great instrumentation. Recommended for your collection !....by loserboy ....~
Another band from the seventies era that I only knew recently from a friend of mine who knew the band in the seventies. As this was released in 1973, the only connection I can make is that by that time Genesis had already released 'Foxtrot' and at the same time of Fantasy debut, Genesis also released 'Selling England By The Pound'. And talking about Yes, they already released 'Close To The Edge' a year in advance and 'Tales From Topographic Ocean' was released at the same time with Fantasy's debut. Nope! I am not trying to make a connection between Fantasy and Genesis nor Fantasy and Yes in terms of music style as they are NOT alike. My point is pretty simple: what would I think about Fantasy 'Paint A Picture' when I knew it in 1973 and at that time I had already been familiar with Genesis, Yes, King Crimson, Gentle Giant, ELP? Well of course I would not consider this 'Paint A Picture' at par excellent as 'Selling England By The Pound' or 'Tales From Topographic'. Worse, maybe I was not interested at all with the music as the composition is so simple and nothing as complex as 'Supper's Ready' or 'The Battel of Epping Forest' or 'The Ancient'. See my point?
Well, I need to make that connection because I am afraid if I only make a review of this 1973 album that I knew only in recent years, I would tend to rate it higher to compensate my 'mistake' for not knowing the band for such a long time. I also want to avoid the 'halo effect' because of the feeling of peacefulness enjoying vintage record like this.

Composition-wise, nothing really spells out from this debut album of Fantasy. Each composition revolves around song approach where the music was most likely composed on top of previously written melody as typically pop song. In fact there are many pop elements in the music even though the music is much more to psychedelic prog. I may refer the music is in the vein of Procol Harum even though they are not precisely the same. But don't get me wrong, I do enjoy spinning this album especially with its vintage sound and simple composition. All of the ten tracks provided here have good to excellent melody as this is a song-orientated album.

The opening track 'Paint A Picture' (5:24) lays down the overall tone of the album nicely with an atmospheric opening using long sustain keyboard as background of vocals. It moves in soft to medium tempo. The key of the song is on vocal harmonies backed with long sustain organ / keyboard work. The electric guitar sometimes provide its solo. It's a psychedelic music, really. 'Circus' (6:18) is a nicely composed track with bass guitar providing the role of beet keeper combined with drums. The electric and acoustic guitar become a rhythm section that overlays keyboard sound. The interlude of the song is nice, exploring organ work backed with solid bassline and electric guitar fills. 'The Award' (4:52) brings the music back to mellow style with nice guitar work. The tempo is slow to medium. 'Politely Insane' (3:27) sounds like an unfinished pop song.

'Widow' (2:12) is a nice mellow track with catchy melodies and very nice acoustic guitar work accompanying vocal line. 'Icy River' (5:53) brings the music into much upbeat style at the opening part followed with a break using acoustic guitar work and organ sound. 'Thank Christ' (4:06) sounds like a ballad. 'Young Man's Fortune' (3:41) brings the music in upbeat mode with organ and guitar as main instruments on top of solid basslines. 'Gnome Song' (4:19) is a nicely composed song in dark nuance using a combination of piano and catchy acoustic guitar work accompanying the vocal line. The acoustic guitar work is excellent. The album concludes nicely with an ambient organ work that remarks the intro of 'Silent Mine' (4:39). The concluding track is an organ-driven composition.

Overall, this is a good album and will favor you if you really love vintage music. Composition-wise there is no complex track offered here, but I am sure you would enjoy the album. Keep on proggin' .....!by Gatot ....~
Another UK outfit with a style close the likes of early 70's British Prog bands.Formed in 1970 in Kent as ''Chapel Farm'',the original line-up consisted of Paul Lawrence, David Read, David Metcalfe, Bob Vann and Brian Catham.Unfortunately Vann was killed in a car accident and Catham got off the board soon after,but the rest of the band decided to carry on with Peter James on guitars and Jon Webster on drums (both coming from a band called ''Joy''),along with a new name ''Firequeen''.Focusing on original material they were finally signed by Polydor on a three-year contract and released their first album ''Paint a picture'' (original title was ''Virgin on the ridiculuous''),after they were offended to change their name.
A rather unknown and much sought-after album in the past,''Paint a picture'' pays a tribute to the albums which established the early-70's UK Progressive sound,next to the likes of BARCLAY JAMES HARVEST and, mostly in this case,CRESSIDA.That means that this is carefully-performed well-orchestrated rock music with Pop-Psychedelic elements, but also delicate guitar playing,symph-like keyboards and a heavy amount of vocal arrangements.Similarities with CRESSIDA are undeniable.So,FANTASY deliver mainly song- based tracks with clear and sensitive vocals and tried to mix the British Psychedelic sound with a somewhat Orchestral Rock approach,obviously based on the strong use of keyboards,mainly Hammond organ and mellotron.The album is rather soft and flows nice and easy from track to track,additionally it contains some very good and memorable moments.However, while CRESSIDA belong to the early British Prog movement entering the 70's,FANTASY presented the same thing three years later,when progressive rock had already worn better-sounding clothes.

Totally unoriginal yet undoubtfully pleasant and enjoyable,''Paint a picture'' speaks to fans of the afore-mentioned prog pioneers,along with early CARAVAN or even GENESIS.Recommended..... by apps79 ......~
I've heard people say that if you like SPRING you will like this band. Not as much mellotron on this debut by FANTASY when comparing them to SPRING but the focus is on the vocals (lyrics) and they are well done. Every member helps in the vocal department by the way. There's a couple of songs on this album that really do it for me.
"Paint A Picture" opens with soft vocals and organ, then a fuller sound comes in before a minute. Guitar before 3 minutes when the vocals stop. It settles right down with organ to end it. "Circus" is one of those songs I was talking about that just does it for me. It's kind of catchy and vocal-led early as the organ pulses. Guitar around 2 minutes after the vocals have stopped. Great sound when the vocals return after 3 1/2 minutes. Nice organ 5 minutes in followed by guitar.

"The Award" is my favourite tune on here. The vocals almost quiver and we get some vocal melodies too. It moves me for some reason. "Politely Insane" opens with strummed guitar then it kicks in quickly with vocals. "Widow" opens with melancholic guitar as reserved vocals join in. Piano and what sounds like violin too. "Icy River" has a good intro then it settles when the laid back vocals come in and the organ floats. "Thank Christ" slowly builds as strummed guitar and vocal melodies join in. Vocals after a minute. Mellotron in this one too. Nice guitar late. "Young Man's Fortune" kicks in quickly. I like the guitar before 3 minutes. "Gnome Song" is mellow with fragile vocals then mellotron. Drums after a minute. The tempo picks up with guitar. "Silent Mine" opens with organ and drums as reserved vocals join in. A drifting track really... 
A good album with some really good songs. 3.5 stars.....by Mellotron Storm ..~

Fantasy. "Beyond The Beyond" 1974 second album 
FANTASY's second album which sadly never really saw the light of day is nothing short of a superb recording. FANTASY blend highly melodic themes with great tempo changes and superb musicianship. FANTASY play music inspired with loads of analog keyboards (aka GENESIS) and even the odd sprinkle of the ol' mellotron. Vocals are charismatic with lyrics drawing heavily on fantasy-like themes and imagery. Their music is probably best described as somewhere in the middle of the road between GENESIS and YES. It would be a mistake to also review thios album and fail to mention the superb guitar playing throughout, which is much more accentuated than on their debut album. Thanks to the fine folks at Audio Archives for not only doing an excellent job in carefully remastering and repackaging this lost gem but including the 5 bonus tracks (3 old 1970 tracks and 2 demo versions). "Beyond The Beyond Plus" is a great album and I would recommend this album to the lovers of English 70's prog.....by loserboy ....~

Repackaging of a lost pearl of 70's English prog/art-rock; I borrowed this last summer (with SPRING's sole album and some others) expecting to be blown way by superb Genesis-like prog, but for me Fantasy was a mild disappointment, lovely Spring being just the opposite. I can't exactly spot what's wrong: nice old prog sound with Mellotrons and all, good playing of keyboards and guitars, decent compositions, imaginative lyrics, sound quality fine enough. I feel I should enjoy this more. Maybe I consider the singer too colourless (while the other reviewer describes him charismatic) and the music somehow mild and predictable for its time. I admit I haven't been listening my tape very often, and right now I have only two songs in my memory. But surely worth checking, that much can be said....by Matti ....~

Fantasy their debut gig at the famous London 'music temple' The Marquee alongside Robin Trower, not bad at all for such an unknown progrock formation. It was the start of a succesfull tour in the country, supporting bands like Uriah Heep, Argent, Free, Supertramp, Geensis, Greenslade and The Kinks. And one night, again at the Marquee, two bands were billed to promote their debut albums: Fantasy and...Queen! The debutalbum was called Paint A Picture and released in '73. Soon Fantasy belonged to the past, the tapes for a next album remained in the vaults of time. Until the label Audio Archives released these tapes as a CD called Beyond The Beyond. In my opinion this CD is one of the highlights of the Early British Progressive Movement, what a wonderful and elaborated compositions! Every track is very melodic and harmonic featuring tasteful keyboards (lots of Hammond organ), strong guitarwork, a dynamic rhythm-section and good vocals. The climates changes from mellow with acoustic guitar and warm vocals to bombastic with fiery electric guitar and majestic Mellotron eruptions ("Alanderie" is such a beautiful example!). THIS IS VERY WARM AND COMPELLING PROGRESSIVE ROCK, ONE OF MY FAVORITES SEVENTIES ALBUMS!!.....by erik neuteboom ......~

This is one of those albums, that like groups like Eloy & Nektar, you end up telling yourself - If only this was put out 2-3 earlier. This is good symphonic prog. For 1972. At this point, the symph prog connoisseur has already enjoyed Genesis' Selling England by the Pound, Tull's Thick as a Brick, Yes' Close to the Edge, and even the beginnings of the classic Italian wave of prog , with PFM's Per un Amico, & Storia di Un Minuta. So is this album unnecessary or bad ? Well, as one who was disappointed with every Nektar album save Recycled due to what I felt were dated sounds. And also, as a prog fan that felt that even Eloy's best - Ocean & Dawn - sounded like echos of a more glorious past; I must say that ... well ... this album won't disappoint those who keep searching for the next new find in 70s symphonic prog. 
But, if you are looking at classics, if you want to hit the highlights only , due to the many high quality releases during the 70s, this is an album that you can safely pass by. Good, but so what. The old dit-ons - been there , done that, done it better. Fine if you can get it a a great price, if not, save your money for more deserving hidden treasures....by debrewguy ......~

One of these bands where you can really enjoy symphonic melodicity. Not so pandering, the strength of this record lies elsewhere (I'm aware that it's in fact 90's release, but from current point of view, I take this as it is. First part of this albums being mostly soft symphonic rock, but not soft as weak, more like tender (and beautiful), I really felt like giving best mark here, but then came second half of this record and with it, something like heavy prog, which brings it down a little bit. But I remember, something like "epic", Afterthought improves whole feeling. So I hesitate again. And that it's 1974 instead of 1971/2 ? Well, I take this as that they matured. From current point of view it doesn't matter so much, now it's golden age of prog & -||- (the same). 
5(-), well, some heavy parts are way too heavy and keyboards can sound annoying, but after all, they're just bonus tracks, aren't they ...by Marty McFly ...~

1. Introduction (2:09) 
2. Beyond the Beyond (5:34) 
3. Reality (2:56) 
4. Alanderie (8:58) 
5. Afterthought (5:49) 
6. Worried Man (2:53) 
7. Just A Dream (3:31) 
8. Winter Rose (3:24) 
9. Church Clock (3:47) 
10. Fire-Fire (6:45) 
11. Vacuum (4:06) 
12. Alone (4:35) 
13. Afterthought (original version)(7:28) 
14. Church Clock (original version)(3:36) 

Line-up/Musicians 
- Paul Lawrence / 12 string guitar, lead vocals 
- David Read / bass, double bass, vocals 
- David Metcalfe / keyboards, clarinet, vocals 
- Peter James / lead guitar, vocals 
- Jon Webster / drums, vocals 
- Geoff Whitehorn / lead guitar on 10-13 
- Paul Petley / lead vocals on 10-13 
- Brian Chattam / drums on 10-13 











Fantasy "Vivariatum" 1970-76. UK 1994 CD
The story of this band started at the Chapel Farm, a farmhouse near Gravesend (Kent) were the band had their first rehearsals. It was the family home of singer Paul Petley, other musicians were Geoff Whitehorn (electric guitar), Paul Lawrence (acoustic guitar/vocals), David Metcalfe (keyboards), David Read (bass guitar) and Brian Chatham (drums), later replaced by John Webster. The lead guitar was by the promising Bob Vann but he died in a car accident, he was replaced by Pete James. The new line-up FANTASY sent a demo tape to the label Decca and changed their name in FIREQUEEN. But Polydor was also interested and they pursuaded the band to sign for them. Again the band decided to change their name, it became FANTASY, a name that fitted more to the style and flavour of the music. The debut album was called “Paint A Picture” and released in '73 (now on CD). Soon FANTASY belonged to the past, the tapes for a next album remained in the vaults of time.

Fortunately the label Audio Archives released these tapes as a CD called “Beyond The Beyond”. This one is an absolute beauty and it contains nine very refined compositions with warm vocals and 12-string acoustic guitars, flowing and sensitive electric guitar and lots of Hammond organ and Mellotron. The highlight on this album is the track Alexandrie (almost 9 minutes) with the Mellotron in all its splendor: majestic eruptions and beautiful waves along a typical Sixties sounding organ...~

Line-up/Musicians
- David Read / bass, double bass, vocals
- Paul Lawrence / 12 string guitar, vocals
- David Metcalfe / keyboards, clarinet, vocals
- Paul Petley / lead vocals
- Peter James / lead guitar, vocals
- Geoff Whitehorn / lead guitar
- Jon Webster / drums

Track Listings
01. Fire-Fire (6:41)
02. Vacuum (4:03)
03. In My Life (3:56)
04. Low Love (4:26)
05. Stardrifting (4:32)
06. I Was Once Aware (3:30)
07. Could It Be Forever (3:55)
08. Fantasy Moods (4:11)
09. Angel (3:24)
10. Alone (4:31)
11. Afterthought - Original version (7:26)

Original recordings re-mixed and produced by Denis Blackham.
Tracks 1, 2, 10 and 11 recorded in 1970; tracks 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, and 9 recorded in 1976; track 6 recorded in 1973. 








johnkatsmc5, welcome music..

volume

volume

Fuzz

Fuzz

Analogue

Analogue

Cassette Deck

Cassette Deck

Akai

Akai

vinyl

vinyl

Music

Music

sound

sound

Hi`s Master`s Voice

Hi`s Master`s Voice

Vinyl

Vinyl

music forever

music forever

“A Revolutionary New Triumph in Tape” 1958

“A Revolutionary New Triumph in Tape” 1958

vinyl

vinyl