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18 Jun 2016

13th Floor Elevators “The Psychedelic Sounds of” USA 1966




13th Floor Elevators “The Psychedelic Sounds of” USA 1966

full album………a psychedelic masterpiece…!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QEQBfJwYlLY

The tragic irony behind Roger Kynard “Roky” Erickson’s vaunted legacy as the father of psychedelic rock is that the very things that make him so important to so many fans and that keep him prominent in so many listeners’ memories also ensured him a hard life spent in sanitariums and studios. Granted, for many that hard life is an integral part of his cachet: Arrested in 1969 and charged with possession, Erickson pleaded insanity rather than face jail time, and was committed to Rusk State Hospital. As legend has it, his mind was so devastated by the shock therapies and medications that he spent the rest of his life battling serious mental illness that left him easy prey for unscrupulous record promoters (who had him sign away his royalties for numerous reissues) and sabotaged almost every attempt at a comeback.

There are, of course, scores of 1960s cautionary tales, but the music Erickson helped to make and the lifestyle he promoted with the 13th Floor Elevators explicitly advocated drug use as mind expansion, as true spiritual freedom– a bunk idea he shared with Jim Morrison, although even at his most obtuse, Erickson never descended to the empty-headed blathering and lounge-act crooning that were the hallmarks of the celebrated Lizard King. Erickson’s psychedelia was not passive aural wallpapers– all pretty shapes and colors to listen to while tripping– but an active force of social, musical, and psychological change. Aside from the infamous album starter “You’re Gonna Miss Me”, which Erickson wrote for his previous band the Spades before rerecording with the 13th Floor Elevators, The Psychedelic Sounds is awash in narcotic philosophy. And in case you miss it, Tommy Hall explains it all in his original liner notes.

However, what makes The Psychedelic Sounds powerful 40 years later isn’t its questionable philosophy but, as the title makes clear, its psychedelic sound. The 13th Floor Elevators were a remarkable band: Erickson’s wild-man vocals create an atmosphere where unfettered mayhem reigns. Stacy Sutherland’s piercing guitar puts a dark mood on “Roller Coaster” and “Reverberation (Doubt)”, while drummer John Ike Walton ties it all together. It’s a dynamic that’s even more pronounced on the eight live tracks on this UK reissue, which were recorded in San Francisco following the album’s release. Their covers of Solomon Burke’s “Everybody Needs Somebody to Love”, the Beatles’ “The Word”, and even their take on that ‘60s live staple “Gloria”, are anything but placid drugs trips or by-the-numbers re-creation; instead, the songs get the full psychedelic treatment as the Elevators play them like they’re handling snakes.

As with any historical legacy, however, Erickson’s reputation as the father of psychedelia is largely oversimplified. He was a late addition to the 13th Floor Elevators, which was the brainchild of Tommy Hall. Hall’s acid poetry informs every song on The Psychedelic Sounds (aside from “You’re Gonna Miss Me”, Erickson’s lone contribution). And, perhaps most important, it was Hall who plugged in his jug and provided the psychedelic sound that evokes the chemical weightlessness of a trip. It’s the wiggedly-wiggedly of a dream sequence, the sound of your hands melting or of a dimensional door squeaking open. That the 13th Floor Elevators could translate that concept into an aural sensation is perhaps the root of their reputation and would have been impossible without Hall.

Erickson, however, undoubtedly was a creative force in the band, as a vocalist on Psychedelic Sounds and also as a songwriter on the follow-up, Easter Everywhere. Selections from those two albums, as well as from subsequent aborted comebacks, are collected on the two-disk I Have Always Been Here: The Roky Erickson Story, which is, unbelievably, the first overview of his long, strange career. Erickson’s is a long career to capture on only two disks, but Shout! Factory makes judicious use of the space not only to provide a chronology of Erickson’s development over four decades, but also to paint him as a sort of outsider artist rather than as a victim.

Emphasizing Erickson’s solo output over his reputation-making Elevators material, the collection includes only a handful of tracks from The Psychedelic Sounds and Easter Everywhere. “Slip Inside This House” is a masterpiece of psychedelic inventiveness, a spacey blues jam that circles back on itself and eats its tail. On “I Had to Tell You” and the heartbreaking same-session outtake “Right Track Now”, Erickson foregoes his usual hysterical vocals for a much more direct, reflective approach.

But I Have Always Been Here is more interested in Erickson’s less-explored post-Elevators period, roughly from the mid-70s to the present. Whether solo or with the Aliens, he churned out potent and patently weird Texas blues rock similar to Stevie Ray Vaughn or early ZZ Top and often mimicked the vocal hiccups of fellow Texan Buddy Holly. In the 1970s, Erickson became fascinated with science fiction, re-creating B-movies with songs like “Creature With the Atom Brain” and “Stand for the Fire Demon”. What makes these songs so kick-ass is that it’s the sound of someone going right off the page of the rock script– like so many B-movie auteurs of the '60s (Ray Dennis Steckler and Hal Warren, ill-fated director of Manos: The Hands of Fate, come to mind), he’s doing whatever he wants with no one to tell him that’s not how it’s done.

As a result, very few of the songs on I Have Always Been Here Before depend for their impact on the listener’s knowledge of Erickson’s mental health at the time. This is perhaps the singer’s true achievement, which this compilation generously spotlights: even when he was suffering, his strange music sounds wholly idiosyncratic and spiritually curious, the sound of a man who won’t let the world’s ugliness diminish his enjoyment of life or hinder his search for something solid and secure….

Did the 13th Floor Elevators invent psychedelic rock? Aficionados will be debating that point for decades, but if Roky Erickson and his fellow travelers into inner space weren’t there first, they were certainly close to the front of the line, and there are few albums from the early stages of the psych movement that sound as distinctively trippy – and remain as pleasing – as the group’s groundbreaking debut, The Psychedelic Sounds of the 13th Floor Elevators. In 1966, psychedelia hadn’t been around long enough for its clichés to be set in stone, and Psychedelic Sounds thankfully avoids most of them; while the sensuous twists of the melodies and the charming psychobabble of the lyrics make it sound like these folks were indulging in something stronger than Pearl Beer, at this point the Elevators sounded like a smarter-than-average folk-rock band with a truly uncommon level of intensity. Roky Erickson’s vocals are strong and compelling throughout, whether he’s wailing like some lysergic James Brown or murmuring quietly, and Stacy Sutherland’s guitar leads – long on melodic invention without a lot of pointless heroics – are a real treat to hear. And nobody played electric jug quite like Tommy Hall…actually, nobody played it at all besides him, but his oddball noises gave the band a truly unique sonic texture. If you want to argue that psychedelia was as much a frame of mind as a musical style, it’s instructive to compare the recording of “You’re Gonna Miss Me” by Erickson’s earlier band, the Spades, to the version on this album – the difference is more attitudinal than anything else, but it’s enough to make all the difference in the world. (The division is even clearer between the Spades’ “We Sell Soul” and the rewrite on Psychedelic Sounds, “Don’t Fall Down”). The 13th Floor Elevators were trailblazers in the psychedelic rock scene, and in time they’d pay a heavy price for exploring the outer edges of musical and psychological possibility, but along the way they left behind a few fine albums, and The Psychedelic Sounds of the 13th Floor Elevators remains a potent delight. …by allmusic….

Considering the news that the legendary, infamous Texas band The 13th Floor Elevators are performing for the first time in 45 years, a review of their debut album seemed about right. The Psychedelic Sounds of the 13th Floor Elevators is a brilliant rock album, somewhere between the spooky menace of the Doors and the careening weirdness of Nuggets bands like the Barbarians and Green Fuz. It’s made particularly distinctive by the genuinely wild, revelatory vocals of frontman Roky Erickson and the incredible “electric jug” playing of Tommy Hall; the wispy and ornithological sounds of Hall truly made the Elevators a bizarre myth to be reckoned with.

“You’re Gonna Miss Me” is one of the best rock openers ever, a furious break-up song infused with spite and a descent into the darker recesses of the mind. Stacy Sutherland’s playing here is a benchmark for any psychedelic guitar from Robbie Krieger to the MC5. But this was also a band that could be surprisingly beautiful and warm - the harmonies on “Splash 1” are, as with much of the band’s music, inviting and distancing at the same time. More than many of their ilk the 13th Floor Elevators wanted to expand your mind (“Thru The Rhythm” might have slinky stop-start rhythms but also has genuinely philosophical lyrics) but could also rock the fuck out - “Monkey Island” is just ridiculous fun. This is a clean 35 minute album with a perfect balance of slow and fast songs - “Kingdom of Heaven” though is my favorite on the record, a creepy, moody slow burner climaxing with a perfect Roky Erickson scream of either passion or pure terror (or both at once).

The Elevators’ legend has sometimes eclipsed their actual music - arrests for possession, LSD-drenched shows, and Roky Erickson’s struggles with schizophrenia (and recent comeback) all come to mind as much as their best songs do when thinking of them. But that’s why it’s important to focus on the greatness of this proto-punk classic, whose DNA is in the Butthole Surfers, Brian Jonestown Massacre, Sonic Youth, and Ty Segall. Gorgeous, frightening, and immersive, a work swelling with nerve, ideas, and music that wants to take you to the limits of everything as you struggle helplessly then succumb…..

Considering the news that the legendary, infamous Texas band The 13th Floor Elevators are performing for the first time in 45 years, a review of their debut album seemed about right. The Psychedelic Sounds of the 13th Floor Elevators is a brilliant rock album, somewhere between the spooky menace of the Doors and the careening weirdness of Nuggets bands like the Barbarians and Green Fuz. It’s made particularly distinctive by the genuinely wild, revelatory vocals of frontman Roky Erickson and the incredible “electric jug” playing of Tommy Hall; the wispy and ornithological sounds of Hall truly made the Elevators a bizarre myth to be reckoned with.

“You’re Gonna Miss Me” is one of the best rock openers ever, a furious break-up song infused with spite and a descent into the darker recesses of the mind. Stacy Sutherland’s playing here is a benchmark for any psychedelic guitar from Robbie Krieger to the MC5. But this was also a band that could be surprisingly beautiful and warm - the harmonies on “Splash 1” are, as with much of the band’s music, inviting and distancing at the same time. More than many of their ilk the 13th Floor Elevators wanted to expand your mind (“Thru The Rhythm” might have slinky stop-start rhythms but also has genuinely philosophical lyrics) but could also rock the fuck out - “Monkey Island” is just ridiculous fun. This is a clean 35 minute album with a perfect balance of slow and fast songs - “Kingdom of Heaven” though is my favorite on the record, a creepy, moody slow burner climaxing with a perfect Roky Erickson scream of either passion or pure terror (or both at once).

The Elevators’ legend has sometimes eclipsed their actual music - arrests for possession, LSD-drenched shows, and Roky Erickson’s struggles with schizophrenia (and recent comeback) all come to mind as much as their best songs do when thinking of them. But that’s why it’s important to focus on the greatness of this proto-punk classic, whose DNA is in the Butthole Surfers, Brian Jonestown Massacre, Sonic Youth, and Ty Segall. Gorgeous, frightening, and immersive, a work swelling with nerve, ideas, and music that wants to take you to the limits of everything as you struggle helplessly then succumb…..

It is easy to understand why The Psychedelic Sounds of the 13th Floor Elevators is a cult-classic. It more or less features a billboard advertisement for LSD and other psychedelics on the back cover. The underground-press typeset on it conjures up the days when hits of Owsley’s magical lysergic was legally obtainable in pure and massive quantities and texts like Timothy Leary et al’s The Psychedelic Experience were read as substitute Bibles. The cover art by John Cleveland evokes the reflections of an ergot eye. Then there’s the music. Though an early contribution of the genre of psychedelic music, its lack of studio trickery and extended guitar solos also squarely places it in the garage rock and proto-punk traditions. The driving musical novelty of the LP is the electric jug playing of Timothy Hall, which serves as a second bass and lead guitar simultaneously, and gives this music an exhaustive immediacy. Lastly, Roky Erickson’s vocals foreshadow the breathy, oscillating crooning of punk-era heroes Iggy Pop and Richard Hell, suggesting this music is as much for heads as it is for rockers who want to fuck shit up.

Though Psychedelic Sounds is uneven (the A-side and “Fire Engine” are vastly superior to the tracks that follow), it reconfigures common perceptions about psychedelic music. This is morose music, music that conjures the images of bad trips and pessimism that must undoubtedly result for the sane brain cleansing the back cover liner notes advocate. This is most clearly delineated in “Roller Coaster.” This isn’t Viewmaster-kaleidoscope-have-fun-watching-tracers mental excavating. This is serious, overwhelming business. The first side of the album communicates this vision, and is only matched by The Doors’ debut in terms of dark psychedelic intensity. Though “You’re Gonna Miss Me” is the clear hit here, “Fire Engine” is the arsonists birthday party highlight it’s cracked up to be. Flower Power is Dour Power here: this is not your grandpappy’s happy memory of his trip to Haight-Ashbury. This is murky, disturbing stuff – the poor production simply reinforces its new clear corrective reality…..

This is a terrific album, a gem for history, and the sounds of the Texas Psychedelic movement. Too many people complain about the production and sound quality and I have to believe that most of them weren’t around when this album was laid down. If you weren’t around, let me tell you, most of us have better equipment in our living rooms then was available at the time to most artists.

On this album and Roky, capture the time in music more then most people were ever able to do. From the very first song they grab hold and draw you deeper into the heat of a Texas summer in the early 60’s. Don’t go blaming them for not being proficient, they were just a bunch of spaced out kids with something to say, using the language of the day. They were true to the spirit of the times, as were not many of the successful psychedelic or want'a be psychedelic artists who just jumped on board the latest trend. These guys lived the life and it’s reflected in their work. So the music is a little insane, so it’s a bit immature as viewed through today’s eyes and ears, but they paved the way for many to follow and I defy anyone out there to not be blown away by “You’re Gonna Miss Me” for the first time.

Still today it knock my socks off. And on a side note, in High Fidelity [the movie, not the recording process] what better song to blast from your window as your lover moves out. Hey, I may just be a chick, but I know my roots.

SOME FUN FACTS: The 13th Floor Elevators formed as a band in Austin, Texas in late 1965. Tommy Hall, a University of Texas philosophy/psychology student, had been experimenting with psychedelics and playing the jug in a folk band. Hall came up with the unique idea of placing a microphone next to his jug which created a very unusual sound. He could see that combining his electric jug with psychedelic lyrics opened up a strange new territory, and Hall recruited several additional musicians from a Port Aransas-Rockport area group called the Lingsmen: Stacy Sutherland (lead guitar), Benny Thurman (bass), and John Ike Walton (drums). The final link was Roky Erickson.

Erickson was seventeen when he had written and released a local Top Ten single with The Spades (August 1965/zero Records) called “You’re Gonna Miss Me.” He was an accomplished rhythm guitar player with a powerful voice, and The Elevators signed with a Houston record company called International Artists. “The Psychedelic Sounds of the 13th Floor Elevators” was released in August 1966, and the song “You’re Gonna Miss Me” eventually reached #56. The album also included such psychedelic songs as “Roller Coaster,” “Kingdom of Heaven,” “Reverberation (Doubt),” and “Splash 1.”

Before a second album had been attempted, internal friction and drug problems forced the departure of John Ike Walton and Benny Thurman. Replacements were found in Danny Thomas (drums) and Ronnie Leatherman (bass) although Leatherman only lasted until July 1967 to be replaced by Danny Galindo. This unit entered the studio for two months to cut the worthy follow- up album Easter Everywhere (Sept. 1967). It contained an eight minute poem “Slip Inside This House” as well as “Postures (Leave Your Body Behind)” and a cover of Dylan’s “Baby Blue.”

The Elevators did a good deal of touring that included an appearance on the Dick Clark show. When the Elevators had finished their song, Dick Clark innocently asked Roky, “Who is the head of the band?” Roky’s response was, “We’re all heads.”

The Elevators were having a rough time of it in Texas as they were constantly in trouble with the police and the Texas Rangers. The penalty at that time for being caught with one joint was twenty years in jail. The first time the Elevators were busted they were not prosecuted due to a technicality, but a second bust occurred at a state university with Roky being ordered to stand trial. The defense attorney decided a plea of insanity (based on Roky’s altered state) would be less harsh for his client, but the result was a five year sentence. Roky would spend the next three and a half years at a mental institution called Rusk State Hospital.

The Elevators, without Roky who was their figurehead and unofficial leader, were finished. International Artists tried to capitalize on what success the Elevators had by releasing The 13th Floor Elevators Live album (January 1968) which was essentially studio outtakes that were overdubbed with phony cheering and applause. The last Elevator album to appear was Bull of the Woods (December 1968) that was primarily the effort of Stacy Sutherland.

The Elevators tried to get back together several times after Roky’s release, but an ongoing feud between Roky and Tommy never seemed to get resolved. The death of Stacy Sutherland (killed in a domestic squabble with his wife in 1978) confirmed the Elevators existence was officially over.

Except for a bizarre single called “Red Temple Prayer (Two-Headed Dog)” that was released in 1975, Roky’s sabbatical would last thirteen years. Roky Erickson returned with the 1980 album based on B-grade horror movie material called Roky Erickson and the Aliens (August 198O/CBS-U.K.) It was produced by Stu Cook (ex-bass player for Creedence Clearwater Revival) and included such songs as “Creature with the Atom Brain,” “Cold Night for Alligators,” “Stand for the Fire Demon,” and “I Walked with a Zombie.”

Roky continued to make several more interesting albums throughout the 1980s, but his mental condition seemed to be deteriorating. Then in 1989 he was charged with the federal crime of tampering with the U.S. Mail—apparently he collected mail for an apartment complex and never gave it to the addressees. Consequently, he went to court where the judge did not believe that Roky had a mental condition and had him sent to Missouri for “testing.” At some point in the process, Roky snapped……

Emerging from Austin, Texas in the mid-sixties was the band which many consider to be the pioneers of psychedelic rock, The 13th Floor Elevators. The band was led by guitarist and vocalist Roky Erickson and lyricist Tommy Hall who added a very special and unique element to the band’s sound with the “electric jug”. This was a crock-jug with a microphone held up to it while it was being blown into. However, in contrast to traditional musical jug technique, Hall vocalized musical runs into the mouth of the jug, using the jug to create echo and distortion of his voice.

The band’s debut album, The Psychedelic Sounds of The 13th Floor Elevators was recorded in Texas and released in late 1966. The band found some commercial and artistic success in 1966-67, before dissolving amid legal troubles due to heavy drug use and unabashed vocal advocacy for the practice. In fact, in the album’s liner notes Hall wrote a manifesto detailing the history of mind-altering substances and advocating for societal acceptance of LSD, mescaline, and marijuana as a gateway to a higher, ‘non-Aristotelian’ state of consciousness”. At Hall’s urging, the band played most of their live shows and recorded their albums while under the influence of LSD, which was not yet illegal in 1966. At the peak of their success, the band appeared on Dick Clark’s American Bandstand, where the host innocently asked, “who’s the head of the band?” To which Hall replied, “we’re all heads”.

Despite their very short time in the limelight, The 13th Floor Elevators are credited with being major influences for many future artists including Big Brother and the Holding Company, the Allman Brothers, and fellow Texans ZZ Top, whose guitarist Billy Gibbons credits Elevators’ axe man Stacy Sutherland with shaping his band’s earliest sound. Further, Erickson’s wild, banshee-like screams and high-pitched notes have been credited by some as a major influence on Robert Plant of Led Zeppelin. The band was also credited by many as being a major influence on the punk rock genre, which wouldn’t fully emerge until a decade later.
The 13th Floor Elevators were formed in late 1965, when Erickson left his band the Spades to complete the lineup. In January 1966, the band went to Houston to record two songs for producer Gordon Bynum to be released as a 45 single. The songs were Erickson’s “You’re Gonna Miss Me”, which he had previously recorded with the Spades, and Hall-Sutherland’s “Tried to Hide”. These songs would eventually bookmark the Psychedelic Sounds… album. “You’re Gonna Miss Me” eventually became popular outside Texas, and by October it peaked at #55 on the Billboard charts, the band’s one and only “hit” single. The song sounds like it was influenced by a mixture of Van Morrison and Them and California surf music. It is quite edgy for the time, with the electric jug going wild and powered by Erickson’s feral vocals and Sutherland’s concise but agile guitar work. “Tried to Hide” finishes the album ends on a “high” note (no pun intended) with some high-pitched percussion up front and all the intensity of Hall’s electric jug and Erickson’s voice.

The album’s body contains a mixture of adequate, sixties-style rock and ballads cut with this new “acid rock” sound the band was forging. “Roller Coaster” is a song with sharp, echoed, electric notes that was likely a heavy influence on Pink Floyd’s “Lucifer Sam” on their own psychedelic debut a year later. “Splash 1 (Now I’m Home)” is a pleasant little ballad with a dreamy, nicely picked guitar and the noted absence of the electric jug (which appears on just about every other song). “Reverberation (Doubt)” is a song which was clearly years ahead of its time, a true hippie creed in 1966, while “Fire Engine”, with its wild, freaky siren effects (which may be laughable using today’s technology), may be one of the earliest examples of punk. Although there are some throw-away, forgettable songs on the album, most of it is interesting, innovative, and unique, probably due to the very mind-altering substance that would lead to the band’s quick demise.

By 1968, four of the five members of the 13th Floor Elevators were facing pending drug possession charges and Erickson was eventually sentenced to 10 years for marijuana possession (but pleaded insanity and spent much of the coming decades in and out of mental institutions). To this day, there is much debate over whether the band members were the single originators of “psychedelic rock” or just part of a select movement spearheaded by lesser known artists. In either case, there is no doubt that the 13th Floor Elevators were rock pioneers…….

The Elevators were probably the beginning of psychedelic rock. Nothing like this had been recorded before. No other bands were high and still played on stage, while they were high. This was their debut LP. It didn’t chart, but it had a single that did chart. “You’re Gonna Miss Me” charted at #55 and was their only charting single. This album is great, better than there final LP, but not as good as their second. The music is great, and even features an “instrument” band member Tommy Hall invented, the electric jug. This was a jug that he made noises into that was amplified with a microphone. Some people find this annoying, but I don’t mind it, in fact, I ENJOY it. This album was produced by Lelan Rogers. He did a good job, but it sounds muddy. This probably isn’t his fault, as their label (International Artists) didn’t really care about them. In fact, drummer John Ike Walton even said they weren’t recording when they first playing in the studio but in fact WERE actually recording. They used this material for the 1968 LP “Elevators Live!” and dubbed in the phonny “live” sounds. I quite enjoy this LP. The kind of music you should expect to find here is a psychedelic sound with lyrics that make no real sense. My favorite song here is probably the 5 minute “Roller Coaster”. It’s a great song with awesome guitar playing and vocals. I also enjoyed the quiter “Splash 1”. My least favorite track here is probably “Don’t Fall Down”. I like the song but the vocals at the end (when it says can you feel it) sound kind of strange. The final thing I want to do on this review is rate each song….

The Psychedelic Sounds of the 13th Floor Elevators is the debut studio album by The 13th Floor Elevators. The album’s sound, featuring elements of psychedelia, garage rock, folk and blues, is notable for its use of the electric jug, as featured on the band’s only hit, “You’re Gonna Miss Me”, which reached number 55 on the Billboard Charts with “Tried to Hide” as a B-side. Another single from the album, “Reverberation (Doubt)”, reached number 129 on the Billboard’s Bubbling Under Chart……….

B.F.Trike "B.F.Trike"1971 US, superb heavy garage psych Rockadelic records.



B.F.Trike  "B.F.Trike"1971 US, superb heavy garage psych
Rockadelic records.

full album

Superb 1971 album of heavy fuzzy rural psych-rock with a bit of a country-boy edge by this trio formally known as Hickory Wind. Great vocal harmonies, acidic fuzz-buzz lead guitar and innocent good ol' boy grows his hair long lyrics. Production is not perfect, but it was a different day then. For the opening track they re-record their 1969 Hickory Wind track 'Time & Changes'. Note that the Hickory Wind album is also an excellent album, but is not as heavy as BF Trike which is kind of their 'electric' phase in comparison. Play loud....by...Magognip........
B.F. Trike formed when three members of late 60’s psyche band Hickory Wind decamped to Nashville in 1971 and started work on an album for RCA Records. Eschewing the psychedelic style of their previous band the trio turned up the fuzz guitar and produced ten tracks of great heavy rock.

The tapes were then shelved for eighteen years until Rockadelic issued them in 1989 in a limited edition of 100 vinyl copies as well as on CD. The vinyl is now long gone and fetches astronomical sums at auction, so if you want to hear the album then you will have to go for the CD. The question is, therefore, is it worth it. Well, in this case it might well be, as the songs are catchy, well played and sung, they have great fuzz guitar solos, the rhythm section is restrained where it needs to be and upfront on the heavy rockers, and the whole album hangs together extremely well.

It opens with a re-recording of one of their Hickory Wind songs ‘Time And Changes’, done in a much heavier style and with some fine guitar-work. ‘For Sale Or Lease’ is slightly slower, but still as heavy, with a crisper guitar sound and some good riffing. ‘Lovely Lady’ is a mixture of commercial hook overlaid with stunning fuzz guitar, making it catchy and accessible while at the same time raw and powerful. ‘Sunshine’ lets you catch your breath after the onslaught of ‘Lovely Lady’, being an upbeat acoustic number, while ‘Bench Of Wood’ has a distinct Hawkwind feel to the vocals and heavy riffing.

They keep the style for ‘Six O’Clock Sleeper’ and manage to pull it off by giving it more of a groove and throwing in some nifty guitar-work. ‘Magic Makin Music Man’ is another one of their catchy heavy rockers, and the album ends with ‘Be Free’, which combines the ubiquitous fuzz guitar with some inventive percussion and a staccato chorus which lifts it above the average.

Why RCA refused to issue this at the time Heaven knows, but be thankful that we can hear it now.
PeterJolly…

Poison recommended and musically it’s quite varied but right ‘in’ with the heavy rock/psych school of the time!! Band ex-Hickory Wind!! The Indiana band Hickory Wind made just one self-titled album in 1969, pressed in a run of 100 copies!! Later changed its name to B.F. Trike and recorded an unreleased album for RCA in Nashville in the early ‘70s, though it was eventually issued on a small collector label in the late '90!!…

This album begins with what is probably it's strongest track, Time & Changes. The fuzz runs rampant and the whole song has a nice groovy feel; I love that awesome druggy riff that repeats throughout. The next couple of tracks also offer some enjoyable fuzz fun. For Sale Or Lease is catchy, and Wait & See has a cool little riff that slowly crawls up through the spine and into the mind's eye. Lovely Lady comes next, but I'm not as fond of it. It's got tons of fuzz, so of course it still rocks, but it doesn't quite float my boat as much as the previous three songs. The fifth track, Sunshine, was one two songs on the album not done during the initial recording sessions. For the Rockadelic release, Rich Haupt contacted the guitarist Mike McGuyer to release the band's music, but he told him they would need a bit more material to have a proper album. Fortunately McGuyer had some additional songs he recorded in 1977 to provide. But if I didn't know better, I'd have never guessed the songs came from 1977 when drug rock like this was already dead and forgotten (for the most part anyway). But after learning about the separate recording dates, I do definitely hear a difference in the sound (even though they certainly sound like they could have came from '71). However Sunshine unfortunately does not contain the fuzz of previous tracks and is fairly tame and mellow; but I still enjoy it enough and it seems to work with the album's flow. Upon entering side B of the album, or the second half of the CD tracks, we return to the vibe of the first four jams - catchy, head-boppin' fuzz. Track number seven is an ode to power trios, which is pretty cool. Although I'm not a huge fan of the song itself (it's kind of silly and too upbeat for me), I still dig the effort. Following this, we have the second song of the 1977 recording sessions, Six O'Clock Sleeper. Unlike Sunshine, this song is drugged out of its mind and doesn't shy away from fuzzland. It's also ridiculously catchy and always gets me into motion. This one I'd have never guessed was recorded six years later. Finally, the album concludes with two strong cuts with tons of, you guessed it, fuzz! This album as a whole is very consistent, and I'd say there are no real weak moments. There are only two types of song on here. Fuzz and MORE FUZZ! For me, that is a very good thing :)....by...Groovy_.....


B.F.Trike

*Bobby Strehl - Vocals, Drums
*Mike McGuyer - Vocals, Guitar
*Alan Jones - Bass

Tracks
1. Time And Changes - 2:44
2. For Sale Or Lease - 3:03
3. Wait And See - 2:38
4. Lovely Lady - 3:08
5. Sunshine - 4:51
6. Bench Of Wood - 3:31
7. Three Piece Music - 2:39
8. 6 O'Clock Sleeper - 4:15
9. Magic Makin’ Music Man - 2:13
10. Be Free - 3:42











Gagalactyca.“Gagalactyca” 1971 original Holyground Records Uk Progressive Rock












Gagalactyca.“Gagalactyca” 1971 original Holyground Records Uk Progressive Rock released Private in 425 copies.

full album on dailymotion……

http://www.dailymotion.com/playlist/x4cm7r_John_Dug_gagalactyca-gagalactyca-1971-uk/1#video=x3uaz8h

watch…V.A. Loose Routes 2. Music From Holyground UK 1970-75 Psych Folk Rock….


https://goo.gl/photos/UnMcagedZ66E9KtC6

Gagalactyca is a sister album to Astral Navigations. Lightyears Away has pretty much the same line-up, though with less from Brian Wilson and Brian Calvert who had both left the country. Four songs were destined for Astral Navigations when it was to be called Windows Of Limited Time : Save The Big Jam Roll, The People Show and Woman In My Life. Aren’t You Glad You Stayed? was intended to open the album, which is why it is heard at the end of A - Austr.

1970 and 1971 were prolific times for Holyground - a lot of their very best work was from this period. ASTRAL NAVIGATIONS had been released and yet there were tracks un-issued : such as Chris Coombs’ THAT IS WHAT WE NEED, and several THUNDERMOTHER tracks. At one time or another several of these tracks were destined for Astral, but were left off for others. The solution was obvious: Astral Part Two!

Although planned, the album was not actually released until the early 1990’s when a vinyl version was released with the help of Hugo Chavez’ ‘Magic Mixture’ label. Only 450 of these were made, most signed by Dave Wood and Mike Levon.

LIGHTYEARS AWAY

Originally there was no group name on ASTRAL NAVIGATIONS for the songs on side one of the vinyl LP. The two sides of the record were however given titles : “Light Years Away” and “Heavyside Layer”. Gradually the mix of musicians and composers on side one became known as LIGHTYEARS AWAY, so this name was used for the group on GAGALACTYCA.

Recording Gagalactyca

Like 'Astral Navigations’ Gagalactyca was recorded in mono on one track of a two track Ferrograph tape machine. This was then copied to the other track adding more instruments or vocals, and back again adding more. It was usual to do this three, and occasionally up to five times. Mike used a mixer built by drummer Ted Hepworth, and had a grand total of six microphones. He also had a hand built compressor and a spring echo unit. The studio was twelve foot square, covered in polystyrene ceiling tiles, and the control room was a small landing outside, only seven foot by five.

Tracklist:

Chris Coombs & Lightyears Away
01. Save The Big Jam Roll
02. That Is Wat We Need
03. Cold Tired & Hungry
04. Melanie -Merlin Est
05. Aren’t You Glad You Stayed
06. February
07. Pretty Ane (Original Mix)
08. Pretty Ane (Remix)

Thundermother
09. Woman
10. Lady (Lay By Me)
11. The People Show
12. Come On Home
13. Woman In My Life
14. Main Line Woman Blues.


Fuzzy Duck “Fuzzy Duck” 1971 UK Prog Rock





Fuzzy Duck “Fuzzy Duck” 1971 Mega Rare Original Uk first pressing in Mam Label UK  Prog Rock

full album

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=4LZFm82OgTk

The only LP group from North London + = added bonus, all captured material group. In 1970, the division of Decca Records MAM “attributed to” a new group, seeing it as part of a super-group. Quartet were - guitarist Graham White (Graham White), former bassist and Andromeda Five Day Week Straw People Hoksuort Mick (Mick Hawksworth), keyboardist and Spice Group Arthur Brown (Arthur Brown) Roy Sharland (Roy Sharland) and drummer Paul Francis Tucky Buzzard ( Paul Francis). Quite quickly the musicians prepare material for the album, which was released in early ‘71. Was limited to 500 copies. Presenting to the audience a refined progressive jazz-rock to blues-based, they did not even try to sound a little more affordable for this 1971. Their music can be compared with the works of the early Colosseum, and more - with the Mogul Thrash, but without the brass section. When the group left the plate Graham White to join Capability Brown (he later worked with Christie, Krazy Kat and Jackie Lynton Band). He was replaced by Garth Watt-Roy (Garth Watt-Roy), who had just “jumped off the sinking ship” called Greatest Show On Earth. In this structure, the band recorded two singles - Double Time Woman / Just Look Around (April 1971) and the Big Brass Band / One More Hour (November 1971). Musicians obviously went on the road easier sound, attracted entries brass section, forgetting subtle improvisation - and good old Fuzzy Duck turned into another faceless business. However, their only album, continues to delight fans of progressive rock to this day. In late 1971 the band decided to dissolve the band. Garth Watt-Roy later played in the East Of Eden, Marmalade and under Bonnie Tyler (Bonnie Tyler). Mick Hoksuort collaborated with Matthew Fisher (Matthew Fisher) for his solo work in the late 70’s was a part of Ten Years Later Alvin Lee (Alvin Lee). Paul Francis recorded with Maggie Bell (Maggie Bell) and Mick Ronson (Mick Ronson).

Personnel:
- Graham White - guitar, vocals, acoustic guitar (02)
- Roy “Dazel” Sharland - organ, “ducking vocals”, electric piano (03)
- Mick “Doc” Hawksworth - bass, vocals, acoustic 12-string guitar, electric cello & the cricket bat (07)
- Paul Francis - drums, percussion.

Tracks:
01. Time Will Be Your Doctor (Paul Francis, Nick Graham, David Brown) - 5:09
02. Mrs. Prout (Paul Francis, Roy Sharland) - 6:46
03. Just Look Around You (Mick Hawksworth) - 4:20
04. Afternoon Out (Paul Francis, Roy Sharland) - 4:55
05. More Than I Am (Mick Hawksworth) - 5:30
06. Country Boy (Paul Francis, Roy Sharland, Grahame White) - 6:02
07. In Our Time (Mick Hawksworth) - 6:36
08. A Word From Big D (Grahame White, Mick Hawksworth) - 1:36


Harvey Andrews “ Writer of Songs” 1972 UK



Harvey Andrews “ Writer of Songs” 1972 UK

full album……….

http://www.dailymotion.com/playlist/x330nj_John_Dug_harvey-andrews-writer-of-songs-1972-uk/1#video=x1e5u31

“The songs are completely free from the dross that drags down a goodly number of our singer/songwriter albums… this record is uncluttered, the product of an uncluttered mind, one that has cast out cant and any suggestion of affectation, the mind of Harvey Andrews, a very important writer of songs.”
New Musical Express

“This is an outstanding record which does justice to Harvey’s varied and formidable talent. It should be welcomed with open arms.”
Folk Review magazine

“To many who will undoubtedly buy his new Cube album for its brilliantly contemporary feel, it will come as something of a suprise. The title says it all, simply, uncomplicatedly: a writer of songs. A damn good one”
Melody Maker – Album of the month

“An outstanding collection.”
Record Mirror

“An offering with more facets than Jacobean glassware.”
Manchester Evening News

“A fistful of wise intelligent songs.”
Radio Times

“His voice is amazingly adaptable and his lyrics make most others seem ignorant and ill-considered. Above all though, Andrews’ music is real, gimmick free, and tasteful; rare qualities these days.”
Time Out

“For my money, clear and away the best record of 1972 has been Harvey Andrews’ ‘Writer of Songs’. Since he joined Cube records he has emerged as a writer of national status. He is now beginning to get airtime, and his album is superbly produced and performed.“To him also goes my award for the song of the year; his stark, moving, haunting – no, unforgettable – song ‘Soldier.’ If you haven’t bought his record and you care at all about British songs, go get it and find out what it’s all about.”
‘Sounds’ Review of the year.

Musicians
Harvey Andrews, vocals, acoustic guitar [1, 5-7, 11, 12];
Ralph McTell, acoustic guitar [1-3, 5-11];
Les Thatcher, acoustic guitar [2, 9];
Bob Falloon, acoustic guitar [7];
Paul Keogh, electric guitar [1, 2, 8];
Danny Thompson, string bass [1, 8, 10];
Dave Pegg, bass guitar [2, 3, 11];
Roy Babbington, bass guitar [6, 9];
Ted Taylor, keyboards [3, 8];
Rick Wakeman, piano [3, 9];
Alfie Rees, euphonium [10];
Cozy Powell, drums [1, 9];
Dave Mattacks, drums [2, 3, 11];
Stan Gorman, drums [6]

Hey! Sandy (4.21)
In the Darkness (2.10)
Boothferry Bridge (4.25)
Unaccompanied (3.54)
Gift of a Brand New Day (2.25)
Soldier (4.54)

Anna (My Love) (2.40)
Born on the Breeze (3.32)
Martha (3.30)
When I Am Old One Day (1.50)
Soap Opera (6.09)
Writer of Songs (3.20)


Citta Frontale “El Tor” 1975 Italy Prog





Citta Frontale “El Tor” 1975 Italy Prog

full album…………………………………..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Do3A8Yd9gM

After first Osanna’s split up in 1974, Lino Vairetti and Massimo Guarino reformed a band called Citta Frontale. The band offer a peculiar mix between gentle folk and pastoral tunes within some jazzy incursions and melodic vocals winking at the left wing tradition.

Their only album, “El Tor” is a very easy album to assimilate and enjoy right out of the box, much less complex and crazy than Osanna or some other heavy Italian bands. The mood is mostly light and happy and the songs feature high quality vocals, musicianship, and melodies. Classic keyboards, good electric guitar, acoustic guitars, flutes, sax, there’s a bit of everything thrown into the mix here.

“Alba” features lovely acoustic, hand percussion and flutes soon joined by angelic choir vocals. It is a very lovely and relaxing opening song that puts you in a good mood. “Solo Uniti” then flys out of the gate as a jazzy number with some fiery guitars and nice vocals. The lead singer(s) on this album do a fantastic job and all have pleasing voices. The song veers to pop-rock before bringing back the jazzy flourishes at the end. The title song “El Tor” is next beginning with lovely classical guitar. Pure romantic Italian here as the warm vocals are joined by the choral voices again. Around 3 minutes a nice sax burst gives the mellow tune a kick in the rear and it gets more active with some nice soloing. “Duro Lavoro” is a very good track with more complexity and development. It seems a bit darker and more serious with nice bridges leading to different sections. There is great flute, bass, and guitars. A real Italian epic.

Side two kicks off with “Mutazione” which is a jazzy instrumental, nice playing throughout. “La Casa Del Mercant” is a nice folksy acoustic number with lots of nice vocal harmonies. True it sounds a little pop but still pleasant. “Milioni di Persone” has some harmonica with acoustic and sax, again a light pop song. “Equilibrio Divino” closes the album with a good light symphonic number that sounds more ambitious again like “Mutazione”.

Line-up:
- Enzo Avitabile / flute, sax, vocals
- Massimo Guarino / percussion, vocals
- Gianni Guarracino / guitars, Moog, vocals
- Paolo Raffone / keyboards
- Lino Viaretti / keyboards, lead vocals
- Rino Zurzulo / bass

Track List:
01. Alba Di Una Citta – 3:03
02. Solo Uniti.. – 4:57
03. El Tor – 6:30
04. Duro Lavoro – 8:23
05. Mutazione – 6:52
06. La Casa Del Mercante ‘sun’ – 4:06
07. Milioni Di Persone – 3:39
08. Equilibrio Divino – 6:36

Writing On The Wall “Cracks in the Illusion of Life” 1995 Tenth Planet Label Compilation rarities from 1967-73 UK Psych Heavy Prog











Writing On The Wall “Cracks in the Illusion of Life” 1995 Tenth Planet Label Compilation rarities from 1967-73 Limited Edition in 1000 copies  UK Psych Heavy Prog.

full album

http://www.dailymotion.com/playlist/x2jzve_John_Dug_writing-on-the-wall-cracks-in-the-illusion-of-life/1#video=xyi6w0

Rare unreleased psychedelic material by this great Scottish band who were regulars at Middle Earth etc in the ‘60s. Subtitled 'A History Of Writing On The Wall’, this 1995 release is a great retrospective compilation covering the career of this late 60’s to early 70’s band from Edinburgh who released a true prog classic with 1969’s 'The Power Of The Picts’. Stoned psychedelic rock with a twisted dark side.

Released on a beautiful gatefold sleeve TENTH PLANET RECORDS (UK TP017) in 1995 and is strictly limited to 1000 handnumbered copies,as well as is available Re-issue CD 2002 Progressive Line 24 BIT Digitally Remastered.

This excellent collection is a history of the band 11 tracks of acid may hem collected from the period 1967-1973 contains some previously unreleased recordings. Of their retrospective albums, Cracks In The Illusion Of Life contains both sides of a 1967 45, 'Words And Music’ / 'Peter Gunn’, issued originally as The Jury. Also featured are two promising pop-psych tracks from 1968; 'Felicity Jane’ and 'Flight Of The Mind’ plus the more mainstream 'Katie’s Been Gone’. From 1972 there’s the keyboard-orientated’ Fishers Of Men’. .

Personnel:
Willy Finlayson - Guitar
Alby Greenhalgh - Wind
Jimmy Hush - Drums
Linnie Patterson - Vocals
Bill Scott - Keyboards
Jake Scott - Bass
Robert Smith - Guitar

1. Words and Music 02:18
2. Peter Gunn 02:51
3. Felicity Jane 03:17
4. Flight of the Mind 03:35
5. Katie’s Been Gone 02:38
6. Fishers of Men 06:28
7. Buffalo 06:54
8. Nobody Knows 03:58
9. Bellyful of Rock 05:37
10. Man of Renown 03:28
11. Tripsy Lady 04:03


Chimera “ Chimera” UK Acid Folk/Baroque Psychedelia 1969-70




Chimera “ Chimera” UK ultra rare Acid Folk/Baroque Psychedelia 1969-70.

full album……………………………

https://vk.com/wall312142499_3731

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SyDkt5o8YMA



Legendary in collector circles for years, this magnificent unreleased album from the late ‘60s UK acid folk/psych scene is now available on CD for the first time, with a cache of pre-LP sessions bonus tracks making their debut in any format. Led by a couple of Swinging London pop groupies, Chimera recorded their album for Morgan Blue Town, but it was never released because of an accident to the lead singer that would have prevented her from promoting it. The sessions were produced by the group’s manager, Pink Floyd’s Nick Mason - both he and Floyd keyboardist Rick Wright make cameo instrumental appearances, while other names involved include the Smoke’s Mal Luker, who plays guitar and produces the earlier tracks, future Fleetwood Mac guitarist Bob Weston, and the Orange Bicycle’s Wil Malone, who arranges all the songs. Detailed booklet tells the full Chimera story (and what a story it is!) with quotes and photos.
Legendary lost masterpiece of late 60s acid folk/baroque psychedelia, the unreleased 1969 album by Chimera – featuring future Fleetwood Mac guitarist Bob Weston – was partly produced by Pink Floyd drummer Nick Mason who, like Rick Wright, makes a cameo appearance. First released a couple of years ago in vinyl-only format, this first-ever CD issue adds an extra eight previously-unheard pre-album demos to come up with the definitive Chimera anthology. 12 page booklet with lots of photos and the full story behind the band’s astonishing adventures in Swinging London.
Reviewed by Paul Martin:
Chimera were basically two young girls Francesca Garnett and Lisa Bankoff accompanied by an ever changing line up of musicians (all of them good). The album presented here is mastered from a cassette tape (though you’d never know it to hear it) which was all that was left of these sessions. A projected then abandoned album, the recordings ended up as a miscellaneous collection of sessions partly due to their label, Morgan Bluetown’s, dithering which led to people leaving the group or becoming disinterested. Pink Floyd’s Nick Mason produced all of these sessions and Rick Wright plays harpsichord on 'Lady With The Bullets In Her Hair’, the whole (and sometimes harrowing) story of which can be found in the liner notes and in more depth and context in Francesca and Lisa’s self-published book 'Making It: Famous Names And Silly Girls’.
What we have as the musical legacy is a game of two halves. Half, or perhaps slightly more, of the songs are real vehicles for the girls voices (all the songs are originals). These are acid-folk of the very first order and any Mellow Candle fans for instance will want this album and many of the numbers would have fitted deftly in to 'The Wicker Man’ film soundtrack. Francesca and Lisa’s voices on album opener, 'Come Into The Garden’ suddenly emerge out of a swirling introduction and proceed to take off like two uncaged birds soaring towards the sun. Backed by busy drums, this mid paced number (as most of these numbers are and thus allowing both singers and musicians to stretch out) is a jaw dropper for anyone attuned to an acid-folk vibe. It should be said that none of the songs on this album have a predictable or conventional pattern to them. They are beautifully syncopated affairs with interesting vocal patterns lilting bass lines etc., in fact 'progressive’ in the very best sense of that often abused word, with rhythms rising seemingly from nowhere and winding back down again.
The Grail’ is brooding, full of foreboding and warning with great keyboards in an almost improvised rhythm, whilst 'Sad Song For Winter’ is a beautiful solo vocal from Lisa accompanied by acoustic guitar and harpsichord which produces a surprisingly full sound for such spartan instrumentation. 'Lady With The Bullets In Her Hair’ features Rick Wright on harpsichord (or Spinet or some such) and is a beautiful pastoral and orchestrated number (Cellos, wood wind and a touch of brass) with acoustic guitar. Similarly 'Morning Sounds’ takes us in the same direction. 'Song In E’ is also a beautiful light number featuring acoustic guitar and tablas with a dual female vocal, soft and flowing, a nice tune with good changes.

The other dimension of the album are those songs which feature the band more strongly. Most famously, or at least the track most widely heard by anyone that is part of this aspect is 'Peru’ with its swooping, loping bass line and compulsively addictive rhythm. In similar style is 'Mary’s Mystery’ which has a phased guitar part and a long instrumental passage which rises to a crescendo. The band dominated numbers can best be described as Fairport Convention meets Little Feet as they have a blend of blues-funk and folk rock in them. Both 'Black Hat Babe’ and 'Episode At Telegraph Hill’ (which also includes some John Mayall-like guitar work lacing its way throughout the number) are other examples of this style.

All songs on this album are instrumentally very strong and seem to go out of their way to find counter rhythms rather than plump for the obvious, both instrumentally and vocally. The whole project was far more worthy than the way it got treated, and it is a pleasure to have it here now. I could listen to this all day and still want more. It is slated for release on CD by Sanctuary who own the Morgan Bluetown catalogue as well, and if there is even just one extra track not on the LP, I’ll be bagging that as well! Acid-folkers, dreamers and seekers after musical cerebral accompaniment should all tap into Chimera, this albeit posthumous release deserves a much wider audience.
Personel:
Lisa Bankoff - guitar (tracks 2,3,9) and vocals on all tracks
Francesca Garnett - vocals on all tracks except “Sad Song For Winter”
Mal Luker - guitar and keyboards on “Sad Song For Winter”
Bob Weston - guitar on tracks marked *
Nick South - bass on tracks marked *
Roy Temro - drums on “Mary’s Mystery”
Nick Mason - drums on “The Grail”
Rick Wright - keyboards on “Lady With Bullets In Her Hair”
Ian Milne - keyboards on “The Grail”

1. Come Into The Garden*
Interlude #1
2. The Grail
Interlude #2
3. Sad Song For Winter
Interlude #3
4. Mary’s Mystry*
5. Lady With Bullets In Her Hair
6. Black Hat Babe*
7. Song In E*
8. Episode At Telegraph Hill*
9. Morning Sounds
10. Peru*

All tracks written by Lisa Bankoff
Tracks recorded 1969 except* 1970

Produced by Mal Luker
except* produced by Nick Mason
Orchestral arrangements by Wil Malone

Bambi Fossati & Garybaldi “Blokko 45” 1996 Italian Heavy Prog




Bambi Fossati & Garybaldi “Blokko 45” 1996 Italian Heavy Prog

full album

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uyjdpUT6uXY&list=PL6755C818AFBDE6B1


Bambi Fossati: guitars, vocals
Angelo Traverso: bass
Maurizio Cassinelli: drums

 Tracklist:
01. Cento Volte
02. Scazzo Matto
03. Calda Lava
04. Tuxedo
05. Soffitto Blu
06. Palazzo Pazzo
07. Ali
08. Tecno FYB
09. Peace Pipe
10. Gud Nait 

Fantasy "Paint A Picture" 1973 + Fantasy. "Beyond The Beyond" 1974 + Fantasy "Vivariatum" 1970-76 UK Prog Rock









Fantasy "Paint A Picture" 1973 first lp Uk Prog Rock.

full album…………………………..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8fI1COkVqiw

 Fantasy "Vivariatum" 1970-76  .....

full album.......

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gRRyAFkiDBc

Fantasy. "Beyond The Beyond" 1974 second album

full album......

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gRRyAFkiDBc

The story of this band started at the Chapel Farm, a farmhouse near Gravesend (Kent) were the band had their first rehearsals. It was the family home of singer Paul Petley, other musicians were Geoff Whitehorn (electric guitar), Paul Lawrence (acoustic guitar/vocals), David Metcalfe (keyboards), David Read (bass guitar) and Brian Chatham (drums), later replaced by John Webster. The lead guitar was by the promising Bob Vann but he died in a car accident, he was replaced by Pete James. The new line-up FANTASY sent a demo tape to the label Decca and changed their name in FIREQUEEN. But Polydor was also interested and they pursuaded the band to sign for them. Again the band decided to change their name, it became FANTASY, a name that fitted more to the style and flavour of the music. The debut album was called “Paint A Picture” and released in ‘73…[net]
……………………………..
Along with Spring and Cressida, Fantasy was one of the classic bands in the soft, symphonic and melodic vein of early British progressive rock. “Paint…” was unfortunately the only album they managed to get out while they still existed, but in return, the whole album is a true delight! Very beautiful, melodic and atmospheric with great songwriting from the first to the last track. Personally I like the band best when they were at their most mellow, and tracks like “Icy River”, “Gnome Song”, “The Award” and the title-track are among my favourites. “Politely Insane” is probably the best of the more uptempo tracks, with its catchy melody and great brass-arrangement. Both the atmosphere, sound and lyrics of the last track, “Silent Mime”, reminds me actually quite a lot of the title track from Novalis’ “Banished Bridge”. Vocals are soft and pleasant with lots of good harmonies. Arrangements are tasty with lots of atmospheric organ, Mellotron and guitar. Overall, this is classic stuff…

Line-up / Musicians

- Paul Lawrence / 12 string guitar, vocals
- David Read / bass, vocals
- David Metcalfe / keyboards, vocals
- Peter James / lead guitar, vocals
- Jon Webster / percussion, vocals

Songs / Tracks Listing

1. Paint A Picture (5:24)
2. Circus (6:18)
3. The Award (4:52)
4. Politely Insane (3:27)
5. Widow (2:12)
6. Icy River (5:53)
7. Thank Christ (4:06)
8. Young Man’s Fortune (3:41)
9. Gnome Song (4:19)
10. Silent Mine (4:39)

……… …………………… ………………………….

Fantasy. "Beyond The Beyond" 1974 second lp Acme label Norway. Uk Prog Rock.extra edition in 1045 copies.

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x11h1k1_fantasy-reality-1973-hq-uk-prog-rock_music

full album………………………….

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gRRyAFkiDBc

Fantasy, origianlly known as Chapel Farm, were an odd sort of band, being rather late-psych/proto-proggish in 1973, by which time most bands had moved on to pastures new. For all that, Paint a Picture (the only record released in their lifetime) is a good album, just not the classic that it’s sometimes made out to be. The songwriting’s excellent, slightly reminiscent of the late-psych style that Gracious did so well, with strong melodies and coherent song structures to the fore, particularly on the title track. Most of the album’s keyboard work, from David Metcalfe, is either Hammond or Farfisa organ, plus bits of synth. To be honest, there’s nothing like as much Mellotron as has often been claimed, with only (to my ears, anyway) three tracks on the album, only two of which make particularly good use of the instrument. Paint A Picture itself, as well as being a gorgeous song, builds up to a 'Tron strings-heavy part towards the end, and Gnome Song has some excellent string and flute parts, although Thank Christ is very low-key on the 'Tron front.

After recording an unreleased second album, the band hung around for another few years until quietly slipping away as punk hit in '77. That would’ve been it for Fantasy, if it hadn’t have been for Pete Sarfas at the Audio Archives label, who dug up those unreleased tapes, releasing them as Beyond the Beyond in 1992. Well, would you believe it? It’s brilliant. The songwriting’s easily the equal of that on their debut, while their sound had progressed towards a slightly more 'rock’ direction, and there’s more Mellotron, although not on possibly the album’s best track, Afterthought, which ends with a fantastic classical adaptation, more than the equal of many by better-known bands. The title track waits until the chorus to bring in the 'Tron strings, to incredible effect, whereas Alanderie is several minutes in before any appears. Metcalfe uses choirs on this track, incidentally, proving M400 ownership (I had some strange idea at some point that they used a Mark II). The other 'Tron tracks make good use of the instrument, though not in quite the same league as these two, but all in all, an excellent album on every front. Top marks Audio Archives.

In '94, Audio Archives put out another Fantasy album, Vivariatum (***½), made up of early- and late-period demos, plus a b-side from the Paint a Picture sessions, I Was Once Aware. The CD is, sadly, entirely 'Tron-free, but the story doesn’t end there. After both CDs sold out, most of the best tracks from Vivariatum, irritatingly minus the b-side, were added to the Beyond the Beyond tracks, along with a previously-unavailable demo, as Beyond the Beyond Plus… If only I Was Once Aware was on the disc, it would be the ideal complement to Paint a Picture, as the later tracks really aren’t worth the effort. To add to the confusion, Lake Eerie Records, based in Illinois, reissued Paint a Picture, adding most of Beyond the Beyond as bonus tracks, though not I Was Once Aware. Again.
So; Paint a Picture’s good, with a little 'Tron. Beyond the Beyond (Plus…) is excellent, with loads of 'Tron, and at least both are now easily available.

1. Introduction (2:09)
2. Beyond the Beyond (5:34)
3. Reality (2:56)
4. Alanderie (8:58)
5. Afterthought (5:49)
6. Worried Man (2:53)
7. Just A Dream (3:31)
8. Winter Rose (3:24)
9. Church Clock (3:47)
10. Fire-Fire (6:45)
11. Vacuum (4:06)
12. Alone (4:35)
13. Afterthought (original version)(7:28)
14. Church Clock (original version)(3:36)

Line-up/Musicians
- Paul Lawrence / 12 string guitar, lead vocals
- David Read / bass, double bass, vocals
- David Metcalfe / keyboards, clarinet, vocals
- Peter James / lead guitar, vocals
- Jon Webster / drums, vocals
- Geoff Whitehorn / lead guitar on 10-13
- Paul Petley / lead vocals on 10-13
- Brian Chattam / drums on 10-13

…………………………… …………………….

Fantasy "Vivariatum" 1970-76. UK 1994 CD

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yDnGW-_AtQ8&feature=related

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B4uurBEzxJQ&feature=relmfu


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvGJppLJRPc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l0MlLMIOkio

full

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SO6m8ibq6QQ

The story of this band started at the Chapel Farm, a farmhouse near Gravesend (Kent) were the band had their first rehearsals. It was the family home of singer Paul Petley, other musicians were Geoff Whitehorn (electric guitar), Paul Lawrence (acoustic guitar/vocals), David Metcalfe (keyboards), David Read (bass guitar) and Brian Chatham (drums), later replaced by John Webster. The lead guitar was by the promising Bob Vann but he died in a car accident, he was replaced by Pete James. The new line-up FANTASY sent a demo tape to the label Decca and changed their name in FIREQUEEN. But Polydor was also interested and they pursuaded the band to sign for them. Again the band decided to change their name, it became FANTASY, a name that fitted more to the style and flavour of the music. The debut album was called “Paint A Picture” and released in '73 (now on CD). Soon FANTASY belonged to the past, the tapes for a next album remained in the vaults of time.

Fortunately the label Audio Archives released these tapes as a CD called “Beyond The Beyond”. This one is an absolute beauty and it contains nine very refined compositions with warm vocals and 12-string acoustic guitars, flowing and sensitive electric guitar and lots of Hammond organ and Mellotron. The highlight on this album is the track Alexandrie (almost 9 minutes) with the Mellotron in all its splendor: majestic eruptions and beautiful waves along a typical Sixties sounding organ.

Track Listings
01. Fire-Fire (6:41)
02. Vacuum (4:03)
03. In My Life (3:56)
04. Low Love (4:26)
05. Stardrifting (4:32)
06. I Was Once Aware (3:30)
07. Could It Be Forever (3:55)
08. Fantasy Moods (4:11)
09. Angel (3:24)
10. Alone (4:31)
11. Afterthought - Original version (7:26)

Original recordings re-mixed and produced by Denis Blackham.
Tracks 1, 2, 10 and 11 recorded in 1970; tracks 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, and 9 recorded in 1976; track 6 recorded in 1973.

Line-up/Musicians
- David Read / bass, double bass, vocals
- Paul Lawrence / 12 string guitar, vocals
- David Metcalfe / keyboards, clarinet, vocals
- Paul Petley / lead vocals
- Peter James / lead guitar, vocals
- Geoff Whitehorn / lead guitar
- Jon Webster / drums


johnkatsmc5, welcome music..