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15 Oct 2016

A Euphonious Wail ‎ “A Euphonious Wail” 1973 US Psych Rock




rarer than rare one sheet poster of A Euphonious Wail concert












A Euphonious Wail ‎ “A Euphonious Wail” 1973 US Psych Rock 
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This is a real great San francisco Psych-rock in 1970’s.
Built around the talents of drummer Doug Hoffman, keyboardist Bart Libby, singer Suzanne Rey, singer/guitarist Steve Tracy and bassist Gary Violetti, the bands self-titled 1973 debut teamed them with producer Brian Ingoldsby. If you like Jefferson Airplane please pick this. ……
Heavily influenced by San Francisco bands (Big Brother and the Trucking Company and The Jefferson Airplane quickly come to mind), the Santa Rosa, California-based A Euphonious Wail was roughly five years behind creative and popular tastes. Not that it seemed to matter given a financially struggling Kapp Records went ahead and signed the quintet to a recording contract. Built around the talents of drummer Doug Hoffman, keyboardist Bart Libby, singer Suzanne Rey, singer/guitarist Steve Tracy and bassist Gary Violetti, the band’s self-titled 1973 debut teamed them with producer Brian Ingoldsby (Lowell Levinger of Youngbloods fame reportedly also helped out). While “A Euphonious Wail” had a couple of nice moments, for the most part the LP was surprisingly lame and uninspired. As lead vocalists Rey and Tracy had decent, if unexceptional voices (though Rey tended to screech in the higher registers). The same type of limitations were true of the band as songwriters (all but Hoffman contributing material). Taken individually guitar and keyboard propelled rockers such as ‘Pony’, 'We’ve Got the Chance’, 'When I Start To Live’ and 'F#’ weren’t bad, but stretched over an entire album, there simply wasn’t much that really stood out. The band were even less successful when they tried slowing things down - check out the lame ballads 'Did You Ever’ and 'I Want To Be a Star’. (The Michael Hawes cover drawing was interesting. Depending on how you looked at it you saw something completely abstract, or possibly obscene.) Needless to say, the album vanished without a trace, followed in short order by the band. ……
(side 1)
1.) Pony (John Brandenburg Jr.) - 4:36
2.) We’ve Got the Chance (Bart Libby - Suzanne Ray) - 4:09
3.) Did You Ever (Steve Tracy) - 3:41
4.) When I Start To Live (Steve Tracy) - 4:50
5.) F# (Steve Tracy) - 3:36

(side 2)
1.) Chicken (Gary Violetti - Bart Libby) - 4:32
2.) Night Out (Gary Violetti - Suzanne Rey) - 2:49
3.) Love My Brother (Gary Violetti - Suzanne Rey) - 4:40
4.) I Want To Be a Star (Bart Libby) - 5:29 

Medusa “Medusing”1979 recording in Norway reissue by Anazitisis records 2003 Prog Jazz Rock.






Medusa “Medusing”1979 recording in Norway reissue by Anazitisis records 2003 Prog Jazz Rock.
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Medusa was a multi racial, progressive rock quintet with Greek, Irish, Norwegian and Argentinean members. 
Their only release was Medusing in 1979. 

Members 
Thanasis Zlatanos (guitar), John Dunne (vocals), Bengt Jensen (keyboards), Per Sveinson (bass), Luis Maria Gambolini (drums) 
Tracklist 
A1 Infinite Progress 5:11 
A2 Loving Every Day 6:53 
A3 Funky Madness 5:22 
A4 Goals 6:56 
B1 Queen 5:09 
B2 Realise 6:49 
B3 Friend 3:25 
B4 Theater Funk 4:39 
B5 Going Home 3:13 

Bo Grumpus “Before The War” 1968 US Psych Pop Rock with Felix Pappalardi












Bo Grumpus “Before The War”  1968 US Psych Pop Rock  with Felix Pappalardi  
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I came to this one working backwards along bassist Jim Colegrove’s timeline. I’d heard Colegrove’s wonderfully idiosyncratic bass playing on Bobby Charles’s eponymous album, whence I’d backtracked him to Hungry Chuck. It turned out that in an earlier life both Colegrove and Charles/Chuck drummer N.D. Smart II were founder members of Bo Grumpus, hence my initial interest in this album. 

Originally assembling in Boston as a funky jugband comprising Colegrove, Smart and guitarists Ed Mottau and Joe Hutchinson, Bo Grumpus mutated into a New York-based folk-rock outfit in the style of the Byrds and veered towards psychedelia at about the same time as their West Coast contemporaries. Indeed, Before The War has been compared to The Notorious Byrd Brothers, though IMHO it also owes a debt to Revolver-era Fabs. The harmony vocals are sometimes very Byrds-ish indeed, but at others very Beatle-ish, as are the keyboards and other esoteric instruments provided by their George Martin equivalent, the classically-trained Felix Pappalardi. The production by Pappalardi is also more sophisticated and glossy than anything the various homely McGuinn collectives ever laid down. 

Whatever, Before The War is a classy folk-rock-into-psych collection in its own right with carefully-constructed songs and excellent musicianship and vocals. For no obvious reason its original release on Atco in spring of 1968 tanked completely, and the album lay dormant until resuscitated by Wounded Bird for CD release forty years later. Meanwhile Bo Grumpus had moved to Bell Records with Pappalardi when he was headhunted by that imprint and recorded a further album Home under the changed name of Jolliver Arkansaw, again featuring Felix and also a guest appearance by his future colleague Leslie “Mountain” West. When this too bombed they called it a day late in ’69 and Colegrove and Smart subsequently joined Ian and Sylvia Tyson’s Great Speckled Bird. Today Before The War is readily available on CD or as an Atco vinyl re-release, but Home still awaits rediscovery and originals on vinyl will set you back a pretty penny. 

Despite the intricacy of much of the playing and production and the frequently mournful and introspective hippy-trippy lyrics, this album has a carefree, floating feel to it. Most of the tracks use the same gentle 4/4 rhythm and seem to flow into one another effortlessly; it almost feels like the whole album is one suite. Colegrove’s nimble flatpicked Gibson bass work is distinctive throughout; like Paul McCartney he was a lead guitarist turned bassist, which helps explain the nature of his playing, adventurous but never intrusive. Probably by comparison to their live sound, the guitars are mostly mixed well back but provide plenty of sonic variety, with fuzz, wah and electric 12-string all exercised. By the time recording had finished drummer Smart had left to be replaced by Ronnie Blake; their no-frills styles are pretty well indistinguishable. The polymath Pappalardi contributes various keys, trumpet, ocarina and glockenspiel. The opening “Sparrow Tune” sets the template, led out by a trademark Colegrove riff and coloured by fuzzed guitar and churchy organ backing. Also notable are the overtly psychedelic “Yesterday’s Streets” with its electronically treated vocals, baroque harpsichord trills and glock fills; the string-laden “Travelin’ In The Dark” which recalls early Moody Blues, and the unmistakeably Beatle-ish “The Moon Will Rise” with lush answer-back vocals and a sublime ocarina solo. The wry “Ragtimely Love” and “Brooklyn” are hangovers from the outfit’s jugband origins. 

Oh, and that name? Pappalardi’s artist wife Gail provided the name Bo Grumpus from a drawing of a fictional monster that she’d hung on their living-room wall. Perhaps that’s why the record didn’t sell; a distinctive name, but one unlikely to be taken seriously even in those hippy-dippy days. (Why they thought Jolliver Arkansaw would be an improvement is even more inexplicable.) …Rising Storm review…… 
BO GRUMPUS was formed in Boston in 1967 and are not to be confused with the group using the name in the 1990s—2000s. N.D. Smart and Jim Colegrove traveled from Ohio to team up with guitarists, Eddie Mottau and Joe Hutchinson. Eddie and Joe had performed as a duo in the mid-sixties called Two Guys From Boston. They had done some recording with Noel “Paul” Stookey as their producer but had only one single released on the Scepter label. N.D. had met the Two Guys when they performed in Dayton, Ohio at the local folk club, The Lemon Tree. N.D. then both recorded and performed with them. When they asked him to join them to make a band he was prompt to say yes. N.D. asked Jim Colegrove to join them on bass. 

The group first performed at The Loft on Charles Street in Boston using the name The Bait Shop. It wasn’t long before Eddie and Joe called their friend Felix Pappalardi in New York to come to Boston to hear the group play. Felix had played bass with The Two Guys on their recordings. At the time, Felix had already produced The Youngbloods records for RCA and was in the midst of recording Cream for their upcomingBoston Tea Party handbill, 1967 Disraeli Gears LP. Felix came to Boston and heard the group. He and his partner, Bud Prager, liked the band and set about to secure a recording/publishing deal for them. The Bait Shop moved to New York City in June, 1967 and prepared to record. 


The first of many changes occurred when Felix asked the band to change their name. His suggestion was a name that his wife, Gail Collins, came up with. Gail was an artist and had a drawing that hung on their living room wall she called Bo Grumpus. It was a strange-looking creature with other equally strange-looking creatures crawling out of a hole in its stomach. Felix thought the name was so unusual that it would be defined by the style of music that the group recorded. Felix was quoted as saying, “It’s a good name that means nothing.” The band made its New York debut at the Gaslight Café on MacDougal Street. 

In the autumn of 1967 they began working at The Café Wha?. The group still hadn’t completed an LP. By the end of the year N.D. decided to leave the group to join John Hall’s band, Kangaroo. The former Hello People drummer, Ronnie Blake, replaced N.D. Music at The Wha? worked in two shifts. The bands on the night shift when Bo Grumpus started were Cat Mother and the All-Night Newsboys and the Peepl. Cat Mother went on to have a big hit with Good Old Rock and Roll on Polydor. Two of the guys in the Peepl, Joey DeJesus and Peter Alongi, went on to record with a group called Banchee on Atlantic and Polydor. Comedian David Frye appeared there that summer. Other bands that worked there during this time were the Raves, the Cherry People, the Roman Numerals, Kangaroo, the Hello People, the Turnkeys, Meat (with Rob Stoner), The Castilles (with Bruce Springsteen), Watertower West (with Alan Merrill) and Jessie’s First Carnival (with Jeff Gutcheon).
In the spring of 1968, Before The War was issued on the Atco label. A couple of tracks were engineered by Chris Houston, former member of The Undertakers. Felix said that the roots to his rock group, Mountain, can be traced to this recording. When Bell Records approached Felix with an offer for him to produce a record, he wanted Bo Grumpus to be the band. The problem was, The Richmond Organization (the group’s publishing company) owned the rights to the name Bo Grumpus being used for a musical group. That meant another name change. 
Boston Tea Party poster, 1968 

At the suggestion of Eddie Mottau, the group changed its name to Jolliver Arkansaw. They went into the studio early in 1969 to record. On one of the tracks, Gray Afternoon, they were joined by guitarist Leslie West. The solo that Leslie played on this track convinced Felix to start a band with him. That band became known as Mountain. Jolliver Arkansaw’s LP, titled Home, was issued on Bell in 1969. Gray Afternoon has been reissued on a Sound Stories compilation CD (see below). It still gets played on cable music channels. 
By August, 1969, Jolliver Arkansaw had come to its end and the group’s members went their separate ways. Jim Colegrove joined Ian & Sylvia’s band Great Speckled Bird and reunited with N.D. Smart. Eddie Mottau became Noel Stookey’s producer, recorded and performed with John Lennon then started his own solo career. Joe Hutchinson headed back to Pennsylvania to start a new life. In the 1970s he would reunite with Colegrove in a band called Jook. 
It is a strange twist of fate that in this day and age some characterize the original Bo Grumpus as “the psychedelic band from Boston” or “anti-war band” when in fact they were a ragtime group in their formative years performing tunes such as Sister Kate, Gimme A Pigfoot, The Preacher and The Bear, Big Fat Woman, Charlie Green (Trombone Charlie) and many others in that style. They were steered in another direction as is evidenced on Before The War. Additionally, the name Jolliver Arkansaw is often spelled “Arkansas” on many Web sites. This seems to indicate that the writer was not familiar with the spelling of the name or else figured the group hadn’t enough sense to spell it correctly. Of course, the name Jolliver Arkansaw did not refer to the state and, in fact, had no meaning. …..
This is a long lost gem from 1968 by a little known, somewhat psychedelic group called Bo Grumpus. Originally issued on Atco Records. 180 gram vinyl. Bo Grumpus was formed in Boston in 1967 and are not to be confused with the group using the name in the 1990s-2000s. N.D. Smart and Jim Colegrove traveled from Ohio to team up with guitarists, Eddie Mottau and Joe Hutchinson. Eddie and Joe had performed as a duo in the mid-sixties called Two Guys From Boston. They had done some recording with Noel ‘Paul’ Stookey as their producer but had only one single released on the Scepter label. N.D. had met the Two Guys when they performed in Dayton, Ohio at the local folk club, The Lemon Tree. N.D. then both recorded and performed with them. When they asked him to join them to make a band he was prompt to say yes. N.D. asked Jim Colegrove to join them on bass.The group first performed at The Loft on Charles Street in Boston using the name The Bait Shop. It wasn’t long before Eddie and Joe called their friend Felix Pappalardi in New York to come to Boston to hear the group play. Felix had played bass with The Two Guys on their recordings. At the time, Felix had already produced The Youngbloods records for RCA and was in the midst of recording Cream for their upcoming Disraeli Gears LP. Felix came to Boston and heard the group. He and his partner, Bud Prager, liked the band and set about to secure a recording/publishing deal for them. The Bait Shop moved to New York City in June, 1967 and prepared to record. …..
Great 1968 Atco US psych/pop/rock album by this Boston four piece, produced and arranged by Felix Pappalardi before he joined Mountain. Pappalardi also shares some writing credits with the band (there is an early version of “Travelling In the Dark” later recorded with Mountain) and he plays on a couple of cuts, but this is by no means a heavy rock record. At times the album has quite an unusual spaced out folky pop feel to it and overall is more of a typical 1968 pop/rock psych album - certainly not what one would normally expect from Pappalardi. Singer/guitarist Eddie Mottau went on to play guitar on John Lennon’s “Walls And Bridges” and “Rock'n'Roll”. 

BO GRUMPUS was formed in Boston in 1967 and are not to be confused with the group using the name in the 1990s. N.D. Smart and Jim Colegrove traveled from Ohio to team up with guitarists, Eddie Mottau and Joe Hutchinson. Eddie and Joe had performed as a duo in the mid-sixties called Two Guys From Boston. They had done some recording with Noel “Paul” Stookey as their producer but had only one single released on the Scepter label. N.D. had met the Two Guys when they performed in Dayton, Ohio at the local folk club, The Lemon Tree. N.D. then both recorded and performed with them. When they asked him to join them to make a band he was prompt to say yes. N.D. asked Jim Colegrove to join them on bass. The group first performed at The Loft on Charles Street in Boston using the name The Bait Shop. It wasn’t long before Eddie and Joe called their friend Felix Pappalardi in New York to come to Boston to hear the group play. Felix had played bass with The Two Guys on their recordings. At the time, Felix had already produced The Youngbloods records for RCA and was in the midst of recording Cream for their upcoming Disraeli Gears LP. Felix came to Boston and heard the group. He and his partner, Bud Prager, liked the band and set about to secure a recording/publishing deal for them. The Bait Shop moved to New York City in June, 1967 and prepared to record. 

The first of many changes occurred when Felix asked the band to change their name. His suggestion was a name that his wife, Gail Collins, came up with. Gail was an artist and had a drawing that hung on their living room wall she called Bo Grumpus. It was a strange-looking creature with other equally strange-looking creatures crawling out of a hole in its stomach. Felix thought the name was so unusual that it would be defined by the style of music that the group recorded. Felix was quoted as saying, “It’s a good name that means nothing.” The band made its New York debut at the Gaslight Café on MacDougal Street. 

In the autumn of 1967 they began working at The Café Wha?. The group still hadn’t completed an LP. By the end of the year N.D. decided to leave the group to join John Hall’s band, Kangaroo. The former Hello People drummer, Ronnie Blake, replaced N.D. Music at The Wha? worked in two shifts. The bands on the night shift when Bo Grumpus started were Cat Mother and the All-Night Newsboys and the Peepl. Cat Mother went on to have a big hit with Good Old Rock and Roll on Polydor. Two of the guys in the Peepl, Joey DeJesus and Peter Alongi, went on to record with a group called Banchee on Atlantic and Polydor. Comedian David Frye appeared there that summer. Other bands that worked there during this time were the Raves, the Cherry People, the Roman Numerals, Kangaroo, the Hello People, the Turnkeys, Meat (with Rob Stoner), The Castilles (with Bruce Springsteen), Watertower West (with Alan Merrill) and Jessie’s First Carnival (with Jeff Gutcheon). 

In the spring of 1968, Before The War was issued on the Atco label. A couple of tracks were engineered by Chris Houston, former member of The Undertakers. Felix said that the roots to his rock group, Mountain, can be traced to this recording. When Bell Records approached Felix with an offer for him to produce a record, he wanted Bo Grumpus to be the band. The problem was, The Richmond Organization (the group’s publishing company) owned the rights to the name Bo Grumpus being used for a musical group. That meant another name change. 

At the suggestion of Eddie Mottau, the group changed its name to Jolliver Arkansaw. They went into the studio early in 1969 to record. On one of the tracks, Gray Afternoon, they were joined by guitarist Leslie West. The solo that Leslie played on this track convinced Felix to start a band with him. That band became known as Mountain. Jolliver Arkansaw’s LP, titled Home, was issued on Bell in 1969. Gray Afternoon has been reissued on a Sound Stories compilation CD (see below). It still gets played on cable music channels. 

By August, 1969, Jolliver Arkansaw had come to its end and the group’s members went their separate ways. Jim Colegrove joined Ian & Sylvia’s band Great Speckled Bird and reunited with N.D. Smart. Eddie Mottau became Noel Stookey’s producer, recorded and performed with John Lennon then started his own solo career. 

It is a strange twist of fate that in this day and age some characterize the original Bo Grumpus as “the psychedelic band from Boston”, or “anti-war band,” when in fact they were a ragtime group in their formative years performing tunes such as “Sister Kate,” “Gimme A Pigfoot,” “The Preacher and The Bear,” “Big Fat Woman,” “Charlie Green (Trombone Charlie)” and many others in that style. …….
Personnel:
Ed Mottau – guitar
Joe Hutchinson – guitar, bass
Jim Colegrove – bass, guitar
Ronnie Blake – drums
+
N.D. Smart – drums
Felix Pappalardi — keyboards, trumpet, bass, guitar, percussion, ocarina, producer 
Tracks:
01. Sparrow Tune — 2:59
02. Think Twice — 2:22
03. Yesterday’s Street — 4:14
04. The Breath O’ Love — 3:06
05. A Knowing Young Touch — 2:46
06. Ragtimely Love — 2:10
07. Travelin’ In The Dark — 2:43
08. Brooklyn — 2:44
09. The Moon Will Rise — 5:26
10. If I Came To You — 2:58 

Wilkinson Tri-Cycle “Wilkinson Tri-Cycle”1969 US Psych Blues Rock






7 metal ACETATE Miss Poe psych-fuzz (1969
Wilkinson Tri-Cycle “ Wilkinson Tri-Cycle”1969 US  Psych Blues Rock
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This trio of Boston, famous for having made the opening act of the Velvet Underground and because Yesterday’s Childrens made a version of one of his songs, was composed by Michael Clemens (drums), David Mello (guitar) and Richard Porter (low ).
Although few articles related to them on the internet are entertained counting chorradas how are you, or talking about the producers of the disc, ie anything but the disc itself, at the end they all agree that the album is very good and it has wonderful songs. I guess this will be because there is more information from them than this, because after the disc do nothing more.
Pilarin Finally, a great album that I put 180gr vinyl edition, and I recommend listening with headphones…..
Wilkinson Tri-Cycle combined a more melodic approach with flashes of heavy rock. They had the power behind them but were more prone to take excoursions into psychedelic imagery and softer moments of balladry. Again the touch of Schatz and Schlaks can be heard in the production on this, the band’s sole album. Taking their hand at blues classics like “Leaving Trunk”, made famous by the great Taj Mahal, they handle them skill but not necessarily ingenuity. The variety of the album works well together, never really rutting into one sound for too long but keeping consistent through the ever-present blues rumble of David Mello’s leads. A thoroughly enjoyable listen, though not necessarily a lost classic.

This obscure power trio is thought to have come from Boston, where they supported the Velvet Underground in 1969, the same year their sole LP appeared. An inspired blend of tough electric blues (Leavin’ Trunk, Antique Locomotives), commercial songs with distinctive hooks (What Of I?, Pourscha Poe) and more overtly acid-influenced material (David’s Rush, Yellow Wall), it’s an overlooked psychedelic gem that deserves far wider recognition.

A strange bit of lost psychedelia – one of the many gems recorded by Columbia during the late 60s and early 70s by artists like this group, who left behind a brief and strong recorded legacy, but never really made it big time. The album’s got a spacey feel on most tracks – with a mix of tripped out guitar, bass, and drums that ring out in kind of a post-Jefferson Airplane vein. Vocals are spooky enough – and titles include “Yellow Wall”, “I Like Your Company”, “9-5, 95”, “David’s Rush”, and “What Of I”. This obscure power trio is thought to have come from Boston, where they supported the Velvet Underground in 1969, the same year their sole LP appeared. An inspired blend of tough electric blues (Leavin’ Trunk , Antique Locomotives), commercial songs with distinctive hooks (What Of I?, Pourscha Poe) and more overtly acid-influenced material (David’s Rush, Yellow Wall), it’s an overlooked psychedelic gem that deserves far wider recognition. …..
Credits
Bass – Richard Porter
Drums – Michael Clemens
Guitar – David Mello 
A1 What of I
A2 Leavin’ Trunk
A3 David’s Rush
A4 Pourscha Poe
B1 Antique Locomotives
B2 9-5, ‘59
B3 I Like Your Company
B4 Yellow Wall 

Travelling “Voici La Nuit Tombée” 1973 France Prog Rock






Travelling  “Voici La Nuit Tombée” 1973 France Prog Rock
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The last of the releases on the ultra-rare and now very collectible Futura Red label, this group’s sole album as leader’s Yves Hasselman dominating it from start to end. This does not mean that drummer Gremillot and bassist Gouré are inexistent, far from it, as they support him quite aptly. Hasselman has a long history of recording with the greatest singers in La Chanson Française and is still active today.
Un-like most KB-lead trio, Travelling does not even attempt to sound or even make the slightest attempt at ELP, preferring a much more pleasant sound rather Canterbury- esque. In this regard, we might think of another trio with a three-letter name: Egg, but Travelling is more than that also, as they sing in French. But the use of a Fuzz- organ and the jazz-inflicted piano playing (sometimes resembling Keith Tippet’s style but much more melodic) cannot help but bring you to the verdict that this French music trio is definitely looking across La Manche (The Channel) at the first mid-size city in Kent. The first side of the vinyl is dominated by the sidelong title track and is a pure joy to hear with Hasselman’s voice somewhat not that far away from Wyatt and constant time-changes contrasting with the numerous switches from the Hammond to the piano.
Flamenco, the first track on the second side is not Spanish-tinged but somehow is a brilliant Kent adaptation with a Wyatt-like scatting reminding you of Andalusia with Nelson not just stopping at Trafalgar. Passo with its ever-present piano and Soleil with its fuzzed-out Hammond are textbook case of how a KB trio can sound other than an Emerson-clone band, both superb. Tout Compte Fait (all considered) is a reflective piece where Hasselman joins both the keyboards in solo. While Shema is a slight return to the title track with Haqsselman scatting again to our purest of delight.
While not essential to the average proghead, this might just indispensable to the Canterbury nuthead, so it plainly deserves its fourth star, but this is the type of album most would want to have simply because of the class of Hasselman….. by Sean Trane….
I am not really into Canterbury and jazzrock but while listening to this album I got more and more and impressed, especially the keyboardplay is amazing, he is a virtuosic who also plays with emotion! In the title track he manages to let his Hammond organ deliver all the excellent sounds that it hosts, this is at the level of Keith Emerson and also the jazzy piano play is great. The overdubs on piano and organ create a captivating sound, this is supported by a very dynamic rhythm-section. The other four songs (between 3 and 4 minutes) contain a bit melancholic French vocals and lots of interestin work on the piano and (fuzzed) organ. An overwhelming CD that should be checked out by the aficionados of this category!….. by erik neuteboom…..
TRAVELLING were a trio from France who released only one album(1973). The organ and piano dominates their sound that is without question Canterbury flavoured. SOFT MACHINE had to be an influence on these guys as the vocal style and fuzz organ certainly bring them to mind. This band does have it’s own sound though and I love it. The side long opening track is one of the best songs that i’ve heard in a while. What a pleasure to listen to. Pure joy indeed.
“Voici La Nuit Tombee” is an 18 minute ride that I have taken over and over again this past week. It opens with cymbals and bass before the organ quickly joins the fray, and it sounds fantastic. A full sound before a minute that includes piano, fuzz organ, bass and drums. Organ and piano then create a piece of heaven before the vocals come in. The light drums, organ and vocals are other worldly. Did I mention I love this song ? Piano joins in. Vocals stop as fuzz organ returns. I could listen to this all day. Vocals are back after 6 minutes. The fuzz organ comes and goes. The piano takes the lead with bass and light drums 8 minutes in. This section is very jazzy. A spacey, experimental, eerie passage arrives before 10 ½ minutes that changes 2 minutes later as an uptempo organ, light drums and bass melody arrives. Fuzz organ after 14 minutes. A change a minute later as piano again takes the lead. Vocals are back 17 minutes in. Amazing song !
“Flamenco” features more bass, drums and piano. The vocal melodies a minute in are outstanding and a nice touch. Perhaps a nod to Mr.Wyatt. Some fuzz bass after that with organ. Piano starts to take over.This song blends into the next one “Passo”. The uptempo piano melodies continue but bass and drums help out here. This song then blends into “Soleil” as piano melodies continue to dominate. Before 2 minutes we get some fuzz organ joining the piano melodies. “Tout Compte Fait” opens with slower paced piano as the organ provides a nice background. This song blends into the final track “Shema”.This sounds better than the previous song because bass, light drums and vocal melodies are added.
This is another French band that has impressed me to pieces. I had heard about them on the ProgEars site and am so thankful I did. A must have for Jazz and Canterbury fans…… by Mellotron Storm…..
Line-up / Musicians
Yves Hasselmann/ piano, Hammond organ, vocals
Jacques Goure/ bass 
Roger Gremillot/ drums
Songs / Tracks Listing

1. Voici La Nuit Tombée (18:00)
2. Flamenco (4:02)
3. Passo (3:05)
4. Soleil (3:03)
5. Tout Compte Fait (3:27)
6. Shema (3:06)

Amonite “Première “Folk Évolutif 1979 France Prog Folk Rock






Amonite “Première “Folk Évolutif  1979 France Prog Folk Rock
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Folk Rock band, for which little is known.Amonite came from France and consisted of Dominique Meslier on flutes, guitars and voices, Didier Dubreuil on guitars, psaltery and drums, Thierry Chatry on metallophone and Jean-Pierre Sandillon on piano, organ, and flute.They recorded their debut “Premiere-Folk evolutif” somewhere in Poitiers, but apparently no date was printed on the album.This was a private release, which some critics place it around 1979, with a fifth member appearing on the front cover, reputedly it was the band’s producer Michel Demily.Soundwise this rare LP is deeply grounded in Folk Rock territories with a strange, fairytale atmosphere and lots of sensitive, romantic passages with poetic French lyrics.However the album has little to do with Breton Folk movement, having often a singer/singwriter atmosphere, based on acoustic guitars, piano and an intense lyricism.The few narrations, surrounded by drums and piano often remind the folkier and more emotional side of Ange.The lack of significant electric passages though grounds Amonite’s album strongly on the Folk fields.While the mood is quite sensitive, the music is very much laid-back with no true dynamics and the pastoral passages often sound too minimalistic.The longer cut “Elles?” is definitely an accomplished composition, featuring Ange-like dramatic organs with a smooth electric solo after the middle, while the constant presence of Psych-tinged drumming and the deep voice of Meslier make this one a beautiful piece of Progressive Folk Rock.Unfortunately the rest of the album is good but not fully convincing with a few adventurous and captivating moments.There is no need to say this was the only release of Amonite, moreover all of the members are yet to be indicated in any further music developments.Their producer Michel Demily appeared many years later as the sound engineer of Taal on their “Mister Green” allbum. ……
Tracklist 
A1 Première 1:38 
A2 Les P'tis Papiers 2:57 
A3 Le Roc Qui Boit 3:44 
A4 Elles ? 6:07 
B1 L'auberge Rouge 3:56 
B2 Souveraine 3:35 
B3 Beau Biat 3:01 
B4 Ballade Médiévale Sur Un Manche 3:28 

Le Match “Legendes” 1974 Canada Prog Rock










Le Match  “Legendes” 1974 Canada Prog Rock
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Highly consistent, though unspectacular, semi-comm vocal prog, featuring some orchestration. The album was recorded Sept, 1974. They were supposedly from Montreal. Grades - 1 B, 6 B-’s, 3 C+’s, and a C. I believe this issue on Sonogram to be the first label of issue for this release, since Sonogram was such a tiny label. It was probably later picked up for national distribution by the much larger T-C label. I also believe the currently posted release date for the T-C release to be incorrect…….
One of Quebec mythical progressive folk album came from the short-lived Le Match, who had time to release one sole album called Légendes. As can be expected when an excellent album hasn’t been reissued in Cd format, the vinyl keep disappearing and become scarce on the market, and while I had the album through most of my youth, it got lost during the crossing of the pond, so now thanks to Alain Malette, he’s sent me a burned from vinyl Cd-r so I could finally re-listen this album after almost 20 years. As one can expect from the whacky artwork gracing the front sleeve, Le Match’s progressive Folk Rock is a bit strange itself.. 12 short tracks (6 aside) of max 5:15, a certainly fun spirit distilled throughout the lyrics and the music, all five members having a good mastery of their respective instruments, Légendes can indeed be considered one of Quebec’s small gems that still needs yet to be discovered by the greater public.
The quintet (a standard prog quartet plus violinist/flutist) develops one of the province’s more diversified folk rock ranging from the hillbilly-type jigs, to semi-medieval solemn ballads, while keeping a fairly accentless French singing, singing their own compositions While the main songwriter is keyboardist Normand Théroux with 50% of the tracks, the other half handled by either guitarist Pierre Yves Migneron or collective efforts (excluding Théroux), it’s most likely to say that each sung their own sung, but both have relatively similar voice (or close enough), thus avoiding a schizophrenic group ala Supertramp and no rift musically speaking. Strangely enough only violinist Leduc seems to soar above the rest of the musicians, not participating anymore than his strict minimum, although he’s often in the forefront.
Comparing Le Match with Harmonium’s first album or the two Conventum albums, or Brêche’s sole effort or L'Engoulevent’s two albums, one might say that Le Match is definitely more earthy or hick-like folk rock (I want to avoid “pastoral” when speaking of this album), somewhere Barde took things yet a bit further. In some ways, Le Match’s folk rock might be closer to Horslips than Gryphon, closer to Steeleye Span than Jan Dukes de Grey, but closer to Comus than to Pentangle or ISB with a tad of Pink Floyd touch. In some strange way, Le Temps’ two albums, while trying to copycat Harmonium’s folk success, but end up closer to Légendes without LeMatch’s excellent all-around musicianship.
While I wouldn’t go as far as investing a fortune on the now-rare vinyl, it is very much time that a label thinks about reissuing this on a Cd format, so I am of course thinking of Sean and Stephen from ProgQuebec, but Unidisc has done a credible job with Opus 5’s Contre Courrant. In either case, this album screams out for a legit reissue, before some ugly bootlegger gets his paws onto a mint copy of the vinyl. While the album’s title might be a bit too much a compliment to describe the album, one can’t say it would be a complete sham either. Just an excellent prog folk-rock album from La Belle Province…… by Sean Trane…..
Line Up: 
Drums, Percussion, Vocals – Jacques Lauzon 
Violin, Flute, Cello – Francois Leduc 
Vocals, Bass – Gaston Rousseau 
Vocals, Guitar – Pierre-Yves Migneron 
Vocals, Keyboards, Flute, Synthesizer – Normand Theroux 
Tracklist: 
A1. Marchand De Nuages 2:10 
A2. Le Soleil Des Plants D'huile 4:05 
A3. Pensez-Y Donc 3:52 
A4. Troubadour 2:23 
A5. Lucifer 5:17 
A6. Epilogue De M. Germain Content 5:18 
B1. Le Vieux Sorcier 4:12 
B2. Le Fou Du Roi 3:05 
B3. Pour Communiquer 4:00 
B4. Les Plaines D'abraham 2:22 
B5. Espace 4:48 
B6. La Cloture 4:45 

johnkatsmc5, welcome music..