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10 Jan 2017

Stack Waddy “Bugger Off!” 1972 UK Heavy Blues Rock




Stack Waddy  “Bugger Off!” 1972 UK Heavy Blues Rock
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Stack Waddy – from Manchester, England – formed in 1965 as a primal R&B and blues-rock band, taking their name from a Mad magazine character who lead vocalist John Knail (formerly of the Knails) vaguely resembled. Prior to this name change, the band had been known as New Religion, and were led by lead guitarist Mick Stott. The band’s nasty reputation often preceded them wherever they went, and they were known to be physically bullying towards promoters and agents. According to liner notes for this CD reissue, Knail would often throw bottles at their audience when he was “dissatisfied with their level of appreciation.” Frequently, this led to him being tossed into jail overnight. They were discovered in 1969 by Radio One DJ John Peel, who signed them to his own Dandelion label, which he’d founded in 1969 because he felt a lot of bands that he liked weren’t likely to ever get recording deals on their own. Their first self-titled album – Stack Waddy, recorded live in the studio, mostly first takes with no overdubbing – featured covers of standards like “Roadrunner,” “Susie Q,” Jethro Tull’s “Love Story,” and a few originals; their version of “Roadrunner” later surfaced on a Dandelion sampler CD culled from tracks recorded between 1969-1972. The most immediately recognizable element of the band’s recordings is Knail’s howling vocals, which would occasionally lapse into a guttural growl similar to Captain Beefheart (Don Van Vliet) or famed DJ Wolfman Jack. In 1972, the band repaired to Manchester’s Strawberry Studios, where they recorded their follow-up album in five hours’ time. According to Peel, who produced the album and contributed to the liner notes, they treated overdubbing with disdain and refused to run through a song before recording it, telling him to “bugger off!” when he asked them to give any particular song another run-through. The results, then, are what you might expect: sloppy, raucous, raw, and very “live.” Bugger Off – which was withdrawn from sale in many record shops because of its title – was also comprised mostly of covers, including Frank Zappa’s “Willie the Pimp,” the Kinks’ “You Really Got Me,” and Willie Dixon’s “Hoochie Coochie Man.” The original lineup finally imploded not too long after its release. In 1973, bassist Stuart Bamham re-formed the band with a new lineup – Mike Sweeney replacing Knail on lead vocals – that lasted until 1976, but the band failed to issue a third album. In 1994, the See for Miles reissue imprint compiled both of Stack Waddy’s Dandelion albums for the first time on CD, but “Girl From Ipanema” was left off to facilitate fitting everything on one CD…..by Bryan Thomas…allmusic….. 

StackWaddy were the rough kids of John Peel’s Dandelion label, their gruff blues-rock sounding like a fart at a funeral alongside the introspective outpourings of labelmates like Bridget St John and Clifford T Ward. They were a tough sell in such soft times, and had broken up by the time this charmingly titled second album appeared in 1972. But the subsequent admiration of American avant-rockers like Steve Albini has revived interest enough to make this expanded reissue of Bugger Off! worth investigating, if you’ve a penchant for sludgy proto-heavy metal in the vein of Black Sabbath. They relied heavily on covers of anthemic riffs like “Rosalyn”, “You Really Got Me” and Zappa & Beefheart’s “Willie The Pimp”, while their own heavy, heavy monster sound is best sampled via the intriguing psych-rocker “Meat Pies ’Ave Come But Band’s Not Here Yet”….. 

StackWaddy were the rough kids of John Peel’s Dandelion label, their gruff blues-rock sounding like a fart at a funeral alongside the introspective outpourings of labelmates like Bridget St John and Clifford T Ward. 

They were a tough sell in such soft times, and had broken up by the time this charmingly titled second album appeared in 1972. But the subsequent admiration of American avant-rockers like Steve Albini has revived interest enough to make this expanded reissue of Bugger Off! worth investigating, if you’ve a penchant for sludgy proto-heavy metal in the vein of Black Sabbath. 

They relied heavily on covers of anthemic riffs like “Rosalyn”, “You Really Got Me” and Zappa & Beefheart’s “Willie The Pimp”, while their own heavy, heavy monster sound is best sampled via the intriguing psych-rocker “Meat Pies ’Ave Come But Band’s Not Here Yet”…… 

Tracklist 
A1 Rosalyn 2:31 
A2 Willie The Pimp 4:03 
A3 I’m Your Hoochie-Coochie Man 4:19 
A4 It’s All Over Now 3:13 
A5 Several Yards 5:58 
A6 You Really Got Me 2:43 
B1 I’m A Lover Not A Fighter 2:05 
B2 Meat Pies'ave Come But Band’s Not ‘Ere Yet 5:19 
B3 It Ain’t Easy 3:50 
B4 Long Tall Shorty (Mainly) 3:26 
B5 Repossession Boogie 5:32 
B6 The Girl From Ipanema 1:27 

Discography 
Albums 

* Stack Waddy (1971) 
* Bugger Off! (1972) 

Singles 

* “Roadrunner” (1970) 
* “You Really Got Me” (1972) 

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