body{ text-shadow: 0px 0px 4px rgba(150, 150, 150, 1); }

Tuesday, 17 January 2017

Stonehouse “Stonehouse Greek” 1971 UK Hard Blues Rock


Stonehouse “Stonehouse Greek” 1971 UK ultra rare Hard Blues Rock,Heavy Rock
 
full



“ The Stonehouse are a group of young people from the West Country. They derive their name from a locality near Plymouth. They are a group of many musical colours, ranging from country rock to classical. This first album shows just one of their moods.” ...~


I have never been that impressed about this record if I’m honest. Stonehouse’s only studio album is a very generic and unoriginal mix of hard rock and blues rock with nothing special to offer. The guitarwork is pretty solid but not exceptional. The lead vocalist is one of the reasons why I don’t like this record that much. His voice and singing style are kinda annoying I think. 
The original pressing is a pretty rare one and there isn’t a vinyl reissue yet. So in case you want to get this LP to your record shelf you need to pay a couple of hundred euros to get it. Even if this is not a bad album it’s definitely nothing special either. There were numerous similar sounding bands active in the early 1970’s that were much more original than these guys. 
Many users here in RYM seem to like this album quite much but I’m not one of them. The guitarwork on this album is nice but that’s pretty much it. Not recommended…..by..CooperBolan……~   


Stonehouse: Stonehouse Creek 1971 is a great Heavy Rock record. Oftentimes wrongfully lumped into the hard progressive sub category, this is just plain old killer articulate early 70s Heavy Rock. The music and vocal stylings bear a slight resemblance to their fellow UK musicians in Free or very early Bad Company. The thing that definitely sets Stonehouse apart from other commonplace hard rock groups is their musicianship. Instead of arranging their material around the guitar, all the musicians use the acoustic piano as a rhythmic springboard allowing them all a more melodious approach to their individual contributions. The Piano is in no way dominant throughout the album, nor are the arrangements too angular. Unfortunately this was the groups only offering and details on the members & their activities are as rare as the RCA record itself…~ 


This is the definition of solid and consistent. The vocal performance is great and the playing is tight. There’s no bombast or posturing here, it’s all understated but heart-felt bluesy rock with great song-writing and a wonderfully warm production, as only the early ‘70s can offer. These qualities stretch over the whole album, not a sniff of repetition or filler to be found. 
Ian Snow (drums) and James Smith (vocals) were both in Asgærd which made one very different album to this, sounding more like an English version of Styx or Kansas, but it was good. 
Has anybody heard the track “Move Away” listed as A4 here? Was it only on the original vinyl? I have not seen it on any re-issues, which all have 11 tracks only. 
The album begins with a plaintive ode to the mysterious “Stonehouse Creek”, lamenting the loss of a well-loved local beauty spot, and then kicks off proper with the good-time bluesrock vibes of “Hobo”. This fully establishes the band’s tight skills; Ian Snow’s funky drumming, Peter Spearings’s nimble blues licks, Terry Parker’s adventurous bass lines and Jim Smith’s versatile wide-range vocal abilities. The second track is a real highlight of the album, “Cheater”, with Jim’s impassioned and brooding performance matching Pete’s doom-laden blues riff. 
“Nightmare” opens with Terry’s quirky, slightly proggy bassline, and this is the first track to include some light piano embellishment, the inclusion of which Jim will voice his minor grievances on later in the interview. Personally speaking, although piano can generally take the edge off hard rock, I like it on this album. It’s well played, not over-powering, and it suits an LP which has a good-natured, fun vibe over-all. 
Toward the end, “Don’t Push Me” introduces some great Sabbathian, progressive riffing. “Topaz” is a compact, groovy instrumental, perfect for those that like Led Zep’s “Moby Dick” but tend to reach for fast-forward at a certain point; this one is drum-solo free haha. Along with the earlier track “Ain’t No Game”, “Four Letter Word” delves into deeper lyrical subject matters, supporting tolerance and anti-war sentiments. The album reprises nicely with Stonehouse Creek pt2, coming back full circle to the homely pleasures of hanging about fishing on a lazy summer afternoon….by….r0b0c0p …~


Good hard boogie rock from 1971, the best year for music ever. Nice guitar and hard material make for a good listen. So catch a buzz, put on the headphones and listen. 

Another “one and done” from this great time in music…..by…rod45 … ~


I’ve read this described as “bludgeoning” hard rock. Well, their sound is plenty heavy alright, with dis-chordant, off key vocals reminiscent of Dio, or even Uriah Heep, with out the organ. But their song writing is much less compelling, which weakens the impact of their mat'l. It is highly consistently good just the same, just could’ve been much better. My grades - 5 B+’s, 4 B’s, and a B-. Recommended for fans of the genre…by…tymeshifter …… ~



“Stonehouse Creek” is one of the best records you’ll find if you peruse the archives of forgotten hard UK bluesrock. Stonehouse the band had their roots in Plymouth, not a place particularly remembered for hard rock, but Plymouth rock did exist, in places other than American history books. 
Many readers with a passing interest in ‘70s obscurities will by now have heard of Leaf Hound, their “Growers of Mushroom” album has long since become the stuff of legend. If you like them, you can’t go wrong with Stonehouse Creek. Cast from the same mold, both in 1971, they share an honest, earthy, blue collar bluesrock sound, with hard-as-nails riffs a’plenty. 
The album begins with a plaintive ode to the mysterious “Stonehouse Creek”, lamenting the loss of a well-loved local beauty spot, and then kicks off proper with the good-time bluesrock vibes of “Hobo”. This fully establishes the band’s tight skills; Ian Snow’s funky drumming, Peter Spearings’s nimble blues licks, Terry Parker’s adventurous bass lines and Jim Smith’s versatile wide-range vocal abilities. The second track is a real highlight of the album, “Cheater”, with Jim’s impassioned and brooding performance matching Pete’s doom-laden blues riff. 
“Nightmare” opens with Terry’s quirky, slightly proggy bassline, and this is the first track to include some light piano embellishment, the inclusion of which Jim has since voiced disapproval over, seeing as it was added by the producer without the band’s knowledge. Although piano can generally take the edge off hard rock, it works on this album. It’s well played, not over-powering, and it suits an LP which has a good-natured, fun vibe over-all. 
Toward the end, “Don’t Push Me” introduces some great Sabbathian, progressive riffing. “Topaz” is a compact, groovy instrumental, perfect for those that like Led Zep’s “Moby Dick” but tend to reach for fast-forward at a certain point; this one is drum-solo free. Along with an earlier track “Ain’t No Game”, “Four Letter Word” delves into deeper lyrical subject matters, supporting tolerance and anti-war sentiments. The album reprises nicely with Stonehouse Creek pt2, coming back full circle to the homely pleasures of hanging about fishing on a lazy summer afternoon. 
Stonehouse was given a very short space of time to record the album, only one day! it’s testament to all their talents that the album sounds as good as it does. Pete Spearing was the ideas man, he wrote all the music and lyrics. His skills, and those of singer Jim Smith (later vocalist of Asgared), are what make this. There are stories of the band playing an album-length progressive epic called “The War Suite” on stage. Alas, this was never recorded, although “Ain’t No Game” is rumoured to have been a final vestige of what must surely have been something to behold. 
Apart from a run-in with an irate shot gun-wielding farmer one cold night after their van broke down, Stonehouse were good lads. They deserved better luck, but non-existent promotion and label support saw them evaporate in a blink after the album was released. To close with Jim’s words: “We weren’t smashing things up, we didn’t get into trouble with anybody. We just played our music. Being good musicians was all we ever wanted.” Anyone who hears the album will be in no doubt that they certainly achieved that……~


Digipack re-issue by German "Universum" of extremely rare and underrated album from the 70s (11 tracks, reprise of title song as bonus). 
Classic rock, classic hard rock,powerful high-pitched vocals, tight drumming, impressive guitar work, and excellent melodies. 
The mastermind behind the band was Peter Spearing, very much underrated guitarist and composer, who toured Germany in 1966-67 (as majority of British acts did), recorded few singles for DEutsche Vogue and even appeared live on Bremen TV. Back in UK he released several singles on Decca and Columbia. 
"Stonehouse Creek" was named after a small locality in Plymouth, in the days of Queen Victoria also known as Deadlake and Tinkies, and surfaced in 1970 featuring (apart from Peter Spearing) James Smith on vocals (he goes nearly hysterical on "Hobo" and screaming like lost soul from hell on "Cheater"), "Snowy" - Ian Snow on drums, Terry Parker on bass. 
The band was soon offered a contract by RCA, and within 3 (!) days recorded their debut album in Advision Studios in London. 
As I failed to find any records of RCA promoting the album, I suspect that it was just dropped due to unknown reasons in spite of the huge potential. 
"Stonehouse" was one of those lesser souls of rock, who were equal to bigger names, but less fortunate; it's useless to look for similarities and try to compare, but just to give an idea - sometimes it reminds first two albums by "Rare Bird" (As Your Mind Flies By), early Led Zeppelin and Deep Purple. Jimmy Smith is pretty close also to the raving madness of Free to Be Stoned-Complete Anthology, when Paul Rogers of "Free" sounds rather low-key and tamed next to him. The musicianship of Peter Spearing must be heard to believe. 
After releasing the first album, the band split, James Smith and Ian Snow joined "Asgard" (In the Realm of Asgard). 
"Stonehouse" is far superior to better known "Jerusalem" (Jerusalem). 
I strongly advise to get it (it might be still available from UK or Hurricane Records in Berlin)....By Golovanov Alexey......~


I bought this album a couple of years ago...There have been rips of an over-modulated bootleg CD of this album at a low bitrate floating around cyberspace for years. Well it has finally gotten a long-awaited legitimate reissue! The first and last tracks are kinda 'country', but everything in between is early 70's hard rock of the highest order. Honestly this is some great stuff, what a shame this British band only released one album. Intelligent, well-played, no-frills heavy duty rock with great vocals, what more could you want? All fans of 70's rock will need to get this one. The album is now rare and sought-after by collectors of this genre, apart from the acoustic title track it consists of hard rock.....~


STONEHOUSE “Stonehouse Creek”, 1971 It’s often difficult to judge an album by its cover. However STONEHOUSE chose to throw their red herring in their first song which begins with a melodic pop song. The band then on “Hobo” show their hand at hard rock with piano playing in the background and high vocals that would be the envy of many a female jazz or blues singer in the foreground. “Cheater” is very much heavy rock due to the guitar tone and equals other heavy bands of the year. “Nightmare” has a huge guitar boogie feel despite the piano playing in parts of the song. The drums and bass compliment the huge guitar tone on tracks like “Down, Down”and leads that command attention. Often the production, which sounds tinny due to the sound of feedback left on the first few songs, means that unlike BLACK SABBATH’s “Master of Reality” it sounds somewhat dated and doesn’t demand the volume to be turned up all the way through. 
It's the kind of album that falls into the transition period from blues/country rock into the harder rock of bands like Thin Lizzy. For some, this could be considered one of those lost gems, but that's always been a label I'm weary of. Often I find 'lost gems' to have been lost for a reason. Many of those albums, though interesting, are very flawed and become forgotten for that reason. I feel this album falls into that category. There are some decent tunes on here, "Nightmare" and "Cheater" being the best, which are also the heaviest songs. Much of the rest of the record sounds like a Creedence Clearwater Revial imitation....by adamus67...~


Excellent and quite enjoyable UK Hard Rock with some great tracks, my favourite are "Cheater", "Crazy White Folk" and "Aint' No Game". You can listen hints of LedZep, Sabbath, Free... in their style. Sadly the album was almost unknown for years because it's extremely rare as an original and, as far as I know, it never was reissued in vinyl. 
Stonehouse: Stonehouse Creek 1971 is a GREAT Heavy Rock record. Oftentimes wrongfully lumped into the hard progressive sub category, this is just plain old killer articulate early 70s Heavy Rock. The music and vocal stylings bear a slight resemblance to their fellow UK musicians in Free or very early Bad Company. The thing that definitely sets Stonehouse apart from other commonplace hard rock groups is their musicianship. Instead of arranging their material around the guitar, all the musicians use the acoustic piano as a rhythmic springboard allowing them all a more melodious approach to their individual contributions. The Piano is in no way dominant throughout the album, nor are the arrangements too angular. Unfortunately this was the groups only offering and details on the members & their activities are as rare as the RCA record itself....~


Stonehouse: Stonehouse Creek 1971 is a GREAT Heavy Rock record. Oftentimes wrongfully lumped into the hard progressive sub category, this is just plain old killer articulate early 70s Heavy Rock. The music and vocal stylings bear a slight resemblance to their fellow UK musicians in Free or very early Bad Company. The thing that definitely sets Stonehouse apart from other commonplace hard rock groups is their musicianship. Instead of arranging their material around the guitar, all the musicians use the acoustic piano as a rhythmic springboard allowing them all a more melodious approach to their individual contributions. The Piano is in no way dominant throughout the album, nor are the arrangements too angular. Unfortunately this was the groups only offering and details on the members & their activities are as rare as the RCA record itself....by..DrXparaMental ...~


". It is a hard rock album as if it is a Stoner system, but there are various now, but it is like a thing that all of those are toppled away. Separately it is not right or royal road is not music, but it is a band that can be said to be a heavy rock of the 70's usually hot Moon moon. Although this enthusiasm is unbearable, the old rock packages the sound of that period is certain, and there is also the absence of technology at the same time so it is settled with power one shot, so there are places like it, it is interesting. That does not understand now, though. Heat is coming out of these places, but the story about whether you like it or whether it is easy to listen to is another thing, I can listen to this hand without any resistance at all ... because there is probably no aesthetics (Lol). 

 I can not say either blues rock or heavy rock, but where did it go? But since there are no keyboards in the 4 players, I tried to rock normally and guitar was distorted and the song was tasteful and tasty in the high tone type and I got a heavy sound, and it was only one sound in the singing band at the time ... It was the only one I guess it's a work, but it's pretty good....~


From Germany 's universal, digipack reissue. There is no remaster notation in particular, but the sound quality can be quite impressive. Stonehouse is a group originating from Plymouth Devon, and it may be known that James Smith and Ian Snow, who formed Asgard later, were enrolled. This album is the only album released from UK 's RCA in 1971, members are 4 members of Peter Spearing, James Smith, Terry Parker, Ian Snow, Produced by Mickey Clark, Not a sleeve, but the design is a key. The first track and the last number of its reply is a West Coast style folk rock number, but other songs develop a boogie bluesy hard that occasionally becomes a twin lead. On the whole, there is catchy without a sense of taste and a little progressive color, there is also a handy hood that looks a little like Andy Powell in the guitarist, it can not be said that it is like touching the wishbone ash more straight to the blues . It is not an impression that heaviness is so far in the front, but it is not necessarily light, but songs that release British moist fragrance and amber feeling, and occasionally a performance that seems like a wishbone ash are obviously braceful I am glad. The original LP is a pretty premium item, but there are enough taste of British ice-tailed darkness and darkness, but nothing boiled down, even if hard rock enthusiasts can withstand the premier price, It is a good edition of Class B British · Hard who will be able to enjoy it. After this release, the band broke up and Smith and Snow formed Asgard as mentioned above...~


This mysterious outfit originated from United Kingdom and a first look and listen fool your senses as an Another dragonfly band. With a cautious approach towards the songs and heavy spin on the turntable, Another Picture is revealing itself. This is a Hard/Blues/Psych rock record with great songwriting and faboulus drive. This is the only album by this obscure outfit, released in 1971. 

The production is timetypical with British Contemporary band´s but with a much more input towards the piano and the rhythmsection. The vocals are great but with a razor edge of turning to much in some songs. There are no standout tune on this album but there´s no song that falls between the Wheels either. The strongest effort is the even high standard on every tune. This is a good job!! 
Whatabout the drummer, Ian Snow?? This a great display of funky backbeat drumming with a nice striking ability. The nest best thing must be the fantastic drive put into every song. Dynamics and hit ratio doesn´t leave you with a divine experience but then again it is hard to get all at once. I enjoy listen to this drummer but I don´t hear the “extra”.. Overall a very good impression. Great input and playing!! 
This record is truly one in disguise. If you´re in for British Hard/Blues/psych rock with focus on “all instrument input” this one´s got few contenders. The Riffs are great, the songs are strong but it is a bit special. Good or bad is up to everyone to decide. 
Great copies are hard to find due to low distribution but there are good reissues on CD that perhaps suits your wallet a bit better. A piece of advice is that you must be patient with this album and then it will reveal its greatness. Cold beer helps to endure the waiting....~


Line-up: 
Peter Spearing - guitar, vocals 
James Smith - vocals 
Ian Snow - drums 
Terry Parker - bass 




Tracklist: 
1. Stonehouse Creek 
2. Hobo 
3. Cheater 
4. Nightmare 
5. Crazy White Folk 
6. Down, Down 
7. Ain’t No Game 
8. Don’t Push Me 
9. Topaz 
10. Four Letter Word 
11. Stonehouse Creek 

johnkatsmc5, welcome music..

volume

volume

Fuzz

Fuzz

Analogue

Analogue

Cassette Deck

Cassette Deck

Akai

Akai

vinyl

vinyl

Music

Music

sound

sound

Hi`s Master`s Voice

Hi`s Master`s Voice

Vinyl

Vinyl

music forever

music forever

“A Revolutionary New Triumph in Tape” 1958

“A Revolutionary New Triumph in Tape” 1958

vinyl

vinyl