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6 Jan 2017

Tonite Let`s All Make Love In London 1968 A Film By Peter Whitehead + Various “ Tonite Let’s All Make Love In London” soundrack Instant Records 1968

















Tonite Let`s All Make Love In London 1968   A Film By Peter Whitehead + Various  “ Tonite Let’s All Make Love In London” soundrack  Instant Records 1968
full movie…
full Lp
Pink Floyd London 66-67 live at the U.F.O Club with Syd Barrett. 
British filmmaker and novelist Peter Whitehead has been credited with inventing the music video with his promo films for the Rolling Stones in the mid-60s. According to Ali Catterall and Simon Wells, authors of Your Face Here, a study of “British Cult Film since the Sixties,” Whitehead was “a trusted confidant of the Rolling Stones… and a member of the inner circle.” In addition to the Stones, Whitehead had access to a surprising number of important figures in the countercultural scene of 60s London, including actors Michael Caine and Julie Christie, artist David Hockney, and a just-emerging (and then unknown) psychedelic band called Pink Floyd. All of these characters show up in Whitehead’s 1968 documentary Tonite Let’s All Make Love in London (above—the version of the film posted here is from a Japanese release and includes subtitles in Japanese). Catterall and Wells describe the film thus:

If any one film truly reveals “Swinging London,” it is Peter Whitehead’s little-seen documentary Tonite Let’s All Make Love In London (1968). Beautifully shot, with a Syd Barrett-led Pink Floyd supplying the soundtrack, it is perhaps the only true masterpiece of the period, offering a visually captivating window on the ‘in’ crowd. Revealing, often very personal interviews with the era’s prime movers – Michael Caine, Julie Christie, David Hockney and Mick Jagger – are interspersed by dazzling images of the ‘dedicated followers of fashion’, patronising the clubs and discotheques of the day.

Departing from typical documentary styles, Tonite eschews neat narrative packaging and voice-over, and opts instead for a sometimes jarring montage of scenes from the London clubs and streets, rare footage of performances by the Stones, the Floyd (in one of their first-ever gigs at the UFO club), and others, and political rallies (with Vanessa Redgrave singing “Guantanamera”)–all intercut with the abovementioned interviews. One of the best of the latter is with a very young and charming David Hockney (below), who compares London to California and New York, and debunks ideas about the “swinging London” nightlife (“you need too much money”).
Overall, Tonite Let’s All Make Love in London is a unique portrait of the era and its rising stars, and Whitehead’s visual style replicates an insider’s perspective of watching (but not participating) as a new cultural moment unfolds. Whitehead, who “never missed a 60s happening,” has a knack for recording such moments. His 1965 Wholly Communion (free here) captures the spirited Albert Hall Poetry Festival in 65 (presided over by doyen Allen Ginsberg), and 1969’s The Fall documents some of the most incendiary political action of late-60s New York…..

“This is Peter Whitehead’s first commercial film- a commentary of London when the world said that London was the first city.
The people in the film created the different image for everyone, their contributions are reflected in the attitudes and music contained in this album.”

This is a soundtrack LP that was released for a documentary film about swinging London, by Peter Whitehead. It merges a musical soundtrack from the likes of Pink Floyd, Vashti Bunyan, Small Faces, with interviews with David Hockney, Edna O'Brien and Allen Ginsberg and many others…………

TONIGHT LET’S ALL MAKE LOVE IN LONDON 1967
U.K. documentary. Cool and interesting audio-visual montage on the then-happening mod, swingin’ London pop, art, protest and fashion scenes. Rare concert footage and inside studio recording sessions. Psychedelic body painting. Music by Pink Floyd, the Animals, Rolling Stones. Interviews include: Mick Jagger, Andrew Loog Oldham, Eric Burdon, Julie Christie, Allen Ginsberg, Vanessa Redgrave, Michael Caine, David Hockney, Lee Marvin. Tonight Let’s All Make Love In London!

Plus these bonus selections…

PINK FLOYD LONDON 1966-1967
U.K. film. The famous 14-hour Technicolor Dream Extravaganza at Alexandra Palace in London is the setting for Pink Floyd’s “Interstellar Overdrive” and “Nick’s Boogie.” Wild happenings at the event include Yoko Ono’s performance art and a Sgt. Pepper-era John Lennon taking in the festivities. (John and Yoko had not yet met.) Also, Pink Floyd at a recording session and performing at the legendary underground psychedelic Club-UFO.

Peter Whitehead’s 1967 documentary of London scene in the swinging-60’s is a visual treat for Mod enthusiasts everywhere. Featuring a who’s-who of the scene, Tonight Let’s All Make Love In London is a visual patchwork of 60’s culture, seen through the eyes of the people leading it. Mick Jagger, Michael Caine, Vanessa Redgrave, Allen Ginsberg, and Julie Christie are all here, alongside counter-culture artists and other musicians who helped shape their generation and future ones to come.

Most of the musical content comes in the form of extremely rare concert footage and inside studio recording sessions, while other segments include candid interviews, strange political demonstration footage, and even a segment on the radical art of body painting! Yes, politics and sex are on the palette here as the psychedelic soundtrack from a very young Pink Floyd, swirls and pushes the film on towards the climax of it’s brisk 70 minute running time. Languishing in distribution limbo for too long, Tonight Let’s All Make Love In London is a fitting testimonial to the changing times in the mid-60’s and one that should be able to live on in the years to come for the young and old to look back on and enjoy…….


If any one film truly reveals “Swinging London”, it is Peter Whitehead’s little-seen documentary Tonite Let’s All Make Love In London (1968).
Beautifully shot, with a Syd Barrett-led Pink Floyd supplying the soundtrack, it is perhaps the only true masterpeice of the period, offering a visually captivating window on the ‘in’ crowd. Revealing, often very personal interviews with the era’s prime movers - Michael Caine, Julie Christie, David Hockney and Mick Jagger - are interspersed by dazzling images of the 'dedicated followers of fashion’, patronising the clubs and discotheques of the day. As a trusted confidant of the Rolling Stones, who had filmed their first US tour, and a member of the inner circle, Whitehead was able to give an unusually free rein to his eye for detail. excerpt from “Your Face Here” by Ali Catterall & Simon Wells

A sealed Time Capsule of that colourful and capering period known as Swinging London would probably contain a copy of 'Sgt Pepper’, David Bailley’s book of photographic icons ‘Goodbye
and Amen’, and Peter Whitehead’s 1967 documentary, TONITE etc …
VOX magazine

TONITE etc - named after Allen Ginsberg’s poem - is one of 1967’s archetypal psychedelic rockumentaries, filmed in the aftermath of the Mick Jagger and Keith Richards ‘butterfly on a wheel drugs trial and acquittal.
Q Magazine.Peter described the film as a “Pop Concerto for Film”; capturing the mood perfectly: pop music, pop artists, pop movie stars, with a dash of protest and druggy shots of Pink Floyd in one of first-ever gigs at the legendary UFO Club. Peter took the Floyd into a studio and for £80 recorded two songs for exclusive use in the film - Interstella Overdrive and Nick’s Boogie; almost 30 minutes of music.
“Seemed expensive at the time for an unknown band - I thought they were were lucky to get such good promotion!”
By the time TONITE was released, Syd Barrett had blossomed, faded and crashed out. The film includes the now famous (and often stolen!) shots of the Rolling Stones and some over zealous fans swinging round Mick’s and Keith’s stoned heads, at the Albert Hall - Mick bravely singing “Have you seen your mother baby….” The lyrical, hypnotising slow motion shots were edited to “Lady Jane” and somehow summed up the sombre, poignant side to the Sixties. It wasn’t all fun and games, as Vanessa Redgrave shows so effectively, singing (again at the Albert Hall) a Cuban revolutionary song dressed in an outfit (straight from the jungles of Bolivia?) that might have been made fashionable by Che Guevara. Eric Burdon’s song - “When I was Young” was grittily and grainily “illustrated” with images from the Second World War.

Intercut between the music sequences are interviews with Mick Jagger, (“I don’t see it as my job to change the world!”), Michael Caine, (some hints at Pop Art Seduction - “At least I never ask!”), Julie Christie, (“This is where it’s all happening!”), Donyale Luna (you don’t remember her? A peach!), Lee Marvin on the set of the film Dirty Dozen, (wondering what’s under the mini-skirts), Edna O'Brien, (“A girl can’t just go off alone across bloody Africa - or if she does, she’ll come back pregnant or something!”), the Pop artist Alan Aldridge, and various snap interviews with people in clubs like TILES or posturing on the streets - like Carnaby Street and the Kings Road.

This unique film not only captures the excitement of the that historic era - but also manages to capture most of the themes of the prevailing zeitgeist - and does so with great cinematic invention and style.
Dave Davies……………..
Tonite Lets All Make Love in London is a soundtrack album released on LP in 1968, for the 1967 semi-documentary film made by Peter Whitehead about the “swinging London” scene of the sixties. The film consists of a series of psychedelic performances and interviews and features live performance by Pink Floyd, together with footage of John Lennon, Yoko Ono, Mick Jagger, Vanessa Redgrave, Lee Marvin, Julie Christie, Allen Ginsberg, Eric Burdon, Michael Caine and many others attending one of the bands concerts.In 1990 See For Miles Records released an expanded version of the soundtrack on CD under the title Tonite Lets All Make Love in London …Plus (Catalog Number: SEEK 258). The album included most of the tracks from Tonite Lets All Make Love in London. Have You Seen Your Mother, Baby, Standing in the Shadow? and Lady Jane by the Rolling Stones is featured in the movie but not on any version of the soundtrack album. “Interstellar Overdrive” which had only appeared in a 3.02 edited form on the original release was replaced by the previously unreleased 16:46 full-length version. Another long and previously unreleased instrumental track by Pink Floyd, the 11:50 “Nicks Boogie”, was also included in this release, together with the interviews that appear in the film.

Other versions of this soundtrack have also been released. In 2001, Power House Records released a CD under the name, Pink Floyd & Friends – Interstellar Overdrive that included the full 16:49 “Interstellar Overdrive” and “Nicks Boogie” (at 11:47) by Pink Floyd, plus an interview with Mick Jagger and an introductory reading by Allen Ginsberg called “Tonight Lets All Make Love in London”. However, there are other tracks by Fleetwood Mac, the Nice, the Moody Blues and others that did not appear on the original album or the See for Miles reissue.

To help promote Tonite Lets All Make Love in London…Plus, the interviews with Michael Caine and Lee Marvin and the two extended instrumental tracks, “Nicks Boogie” and “Interstellar Overdrive”, were also released as a Pink Floyd CD. While the sleeve for the Pink Floyd release of Tonite Lets All Make Love in London…Plus states Mini Promotion – CD Sampler this item was in fact a full release and was available for sale in many independent record stores. The interviews are also as one track, thus the CD has three tracks, although the booklet incorrectly lists the interviews as two separate tracks.

Peter Whitehead’s disjointed Swinging London documentary, subtitled “A Pop Concerto,” comprises a number of different “movements,” each depicting a different theme underscored by music: A early version of Pink Floyd’s “Interstellar Overdrive” plays behind some arty nightclub scenes, while Chris Farlowe’s rendition of the Rolling Stones’ “Out of Time” accompanies a young woman’s description of London nightlife and the vacuousness of her own existence. In another segment, the Marquess of Kensington (Robert Wace) croons the nostalgic “Changing of the Guard” to shots of Buckingham Palace’s changing of the guard, and recording act Vashti are seen at work in the studio. Sandwiched between are clips of Mick Jagger (discussing revolution), Andrew Loog Oldham (discussing his future) – and Julie Christie, Michael Caine, Lee Marvin, and novelist Edna O’Brien (each discussing sex). The best part is footage of the riot that interrupted the Stones’ 1966 Royal Albert Hall concert…by.. Alchetron…….
Shot in the mid-sixties, 'Tonite Let’s All Make Love In London’ is a 1967documentary that captures the various themes personalities and music of an emerging psychedelic counter-cultural London. Featuring the sounds of early Pink Floyd, The Animals and the Rolling Stones the film is interlaced with interviews with such sixties icons as Julie Christie, David Hockney, Mick Jagger and Andrew Loog Oldham as well as archive footage of the 1965 Albert Hall poetry reading (which Peter Whitehead released as the short documentary Wholly Communion posted elsewhere) and the 1967 gig and happening called The 14 Hour Technicolour Dream (held at Alexandra Palace as a fundraiser for the underground paper International Times which featured a number of bands and artists with a legendary performance from an early Pink Floyd released as the short documentary Pink Floyd London 66/67).

These two events are considered the ground zero of sixties UK psychedelic counter-culture and Peter Whitehead captured both events on film. The documentary also features cameo appearances from John Lennon and Yoko Ono (before they met) and incongruously Lee Marvin. Of course some of the scenes seem terribly dated (such as the interview with a swinging London dollybird which in these days of hyper-sexuality and slut walks seems almost quaint) and yet it reminds us of a time when thinking was not considered suspect and pop stars and film stars had more to say than simply “buy me”.

(Depending on which face the English counter-cultural occultural magus Peter Whitehead decides to show you, he can be a seminal film maker; one of the world’s leading falcon expert and procurer; a novelist with over twelve books under his belt (some can be read on-line at his website); alleged British intelligence operative (which of course he denies) and a pop video pioneer (having made very early videos for Marianne Faithful and the Rolling Stones)).Peter Whitehead’s disjointed Swinging London documentary, subtitled “A Pop Concerto,” comprises a number of different “movements,” each depicting a different theme underscored by music: An early version of Pink Floyd’s “Interstellar Overdrive” plays behind some arty nightclub scenes, while Chris Farlowe’s rendition of the Rolling Stones’ “Out of Time” accompanies a young woman’s description of London nightlife and the vacuousness of her own existence. In another segment, the Marquess of Kensington (Robert Wace) croons the nostalgic “Changing of the Guard” to shots of Buckingham Palace’s changing of the guard, and recording act Vashti are seen at work in the studio. Sandwiched between are clips of Mick Jagger (discussing revolution), Andrew Loog Oldham (discussing his future) - and Julie Christie, Michael Caine, Lee Marvin, and novelist Edna O'Brien (each discussing sex). The best part is footage of the riot that interrupted the Stones’ 1966 Royal Albert Hall concert……..
“Tonite Lets All Make Love in London” is a soundtrack album released on LP in 1968, for the 1967 semi-documentary film made by Peter Whitehead about the “swinging London” scene of the sixties.

The film is based around a series of psychedelic performances and interviews and features live performance by Pink Floyd, together with footage of John Lennon, Yoko Ono, Mick Jagger, Vanessa Redgrave, Lee Marvin, Julie Christie, Allen Ginsberg, Eric Burdon, Michael Caine and many others attending one of the band’s concerts.

In 1990 See For Miles Records released an expanded version of the soundtrack on CD under the title Tonite Let’s All Make Love in London …Plus (Catalog Number: SEEK 258). The album included all the tracks from Tonite Let’s All Make Love in London, the only exception being “Interstellar Overdrive” which had only appeared in a 3.02 edited form on the original release and was now replaced by the previously unreleased 16:46 full-length version. Another long and previously unreleased instrumental track by Pink Floyd, the 11:50 “Nick’s Boogie”, was also included in this release, together with the interviews that appear in the film.
To help promote Tonite Let’s All Make Love in London…Plus , the interviews with Michael Caine and Lee Marvin and the two extended instrumental tracks, “Nick’s Boogie” and “Interstellar Overdrive”, were also released as a Pink Floyd CD. While the sleeve for the Pink Floyd release of Tonite Let’s All Make Love in London…Plus states 'Mini Promotion - CD Sampler’ this item was in fact a full release and was available for sale in many independent record stores. The interviews are also as one track, thus the CD has three tracks, although the booklet incorrectly lists the interviews as two separate tracks. …………
Peter Whitehead’s 1967 film Tonight Let’s All Make Love in London was an attempt to document the mid-'60s “swinging London” pop scene at its peak. The soundtrack was an instant collector’s item, divided between interview snippets with such scenemakers as Michael Caine, David Hockney, Julie Christie, and Mick Jagger, and marginal incidental music by ummemorable pop acts produced by Rolling Stones manager Andrew Loog Oldham (Vashti and Twice as Much). The Small Faces’ contribution, “Here Comes the Nice,” is easily available elsewhere. Allen Ginsberg (misspelled “Alan” on the original sleeve) reads the poem that gave the film its name. The chief attraction of this CD reissue is the addition of two lengthy, otherwise unavailable cuts by the original Pink Floyd lineup in 1967 (mere snippets had appeared on the original LP). Their 16-minute version of “Interstellar Overdrive” (re-recorded for their first LP) starts off scintillatingly, then degenerates into a rather aimless jam. The 12-minute “Nick’s Boogie,” not available in any other version, is a considerably more aimless, free-form instrumental piece dominated by scraping guitars. Even in its expanded CD reissue, this album will only appeal to hardcore collectors……. by Richie Unterberger …..allmusic……….

Tracks ListSide One:
1. Pink Floyd – “Interstellar Overdrive” (Barrett/Mason/Waters/Wright) - 3:02
This is the edited version of the almost 17 minutes long early take of the song, which is released on the London '66-'67 album and the See for Miles Records release Tonite Let’s All Make Love In London …plus
2. Marquess of Kensington – “Changing of the Guard” (Leander/Mills) - 3:06
3. Twice as Much – “Night Time Girl” (Skinner/Rose) - 3:00
4. Chris Farlowe – “Out of Time” (Jagger/Richards) - 3:36

Side Two:
1. Pink Floyd – “Interstellar Overdrive” (Reprise) (Barrett)
A clip from the beginning of the 17-minute long “Interstellar Overdrive” take.
2. Vashti – “Winter Is Blue” (Bunyan/Skinner) - 3:21
3. Chris Farlowe – “Paint It, Black” (Jagger/Richards) - 3:35
4. The Small Faces – “Here Come the Nice” (Marriott/Lane) - 3:10
5. Pink Floyd – “Interstellar Overdrive” (Reprise) (Barrett)
A clip from the beginning of the 17-minute long “Interstellar Overdrive” take.

Tonite Let’s All Make Love in London…Plus (1990) (See for Miles Records)

1. Pink Floyd – “Interstellar Overdrive” (Full Length Version) (Barrett/Mason/Waters/Wright) – 16:49
2. “Michael Caine” interview - 0:09
3. Marquis of Kensington – “Changing of the Guard” (Leander/Mills) – 2:52
4. Twice as Much – “Night Time Girl” (Skinner/Rose) – 2:41
5. “Interview: 'Dolly Bird’” - 0:52
6. Chris Farlowe – “Out of Time” (Jagger/Richard) – 3:04
7. “Interview: Edna O'Brien” - 2:23
8. Pink Floyd – “Interstellar Overdrive” (reprise) (Barrett) – 0:33
9. “Andrew Loog Oldham” interview - 0:22
10. Vashti – “Winter Is Blue” (Bunyan/Skinner) – 1:27
11. “Interview: Andrew Loog Oldham” - 1:22
12. Vashti – “Winter Is Blue” (Reprise) (Bunyan/Skinner) – 1:23
13. “Interview: Mick Jagger” - 3:15
14. “Interview: Julie Christie” - 0:46
15. “Interview: Michael Caine” - 1:29
16. Chris Farlowe – “Paint It, Black” (Jagger/Richard) – 3:28
17. “Interview: Alan Aldridge” - 0:46
18. Chris Farlowe – “Paint It, Black (Instrumental Reprise)” (Jagger/Richard) – 0:13
19. “David Hockney” interview - 0:09
20. The Small Faces – “Here Comes the Nice” (Marriott/Lane) – 3:00
21. “Lee Marvin” interview - 0:46
22. Pink Floyd – “Interstellar Overdrive” (Reprise 2) (Barrett) – 0:54
23. Allen Ginsberg – “Tonite Let’s All Make Love in London” (Ginsberg) – 1:09
24. Pink Floyd – “Nick’s Boogie” (Pink Floyd) – 11:50


Tonite Let’s All Make Love in London (1991) (Immediate Sound)

1. Pink Floyd – “Interstellar Overdrive” (Barrett/Mason/Waters/Wright) – 3:09
2. Michael Caine Interview – 0:09
3. Marquis of Kensington – “Changing of the Guard” (Leander/Mills) – 2:53
4. Twice as Much – “Night Time Girl” (Skinner/Rose) – 2:41
5. “Dolly Bird” Interview – 0:52
6. Chris Farlowe – “Out of Time” (Jagger/Richard) – 3:05
7. Edna O'Brien Interview – 2:23
8. Pink Floyd – “Interstellar Overdrive” (Reprise) (Barrett) – 0:34
9. Andrew Loog Oldham Interview – 0:22
10. Vashti Bunyan – “Winter Is Blue” (Bunyan/Skinner) – 1:28
11. Andrew Loog Oldham Interview – 1:22
12. Vashti Bunyan – “Winter Is Blue” (Bunyan/Skinner) – 1:24
13. Eric Burdon and The Animals – “When I Was Young” (Briggs/Burdon/Jenkins/McQuilock/Weider) – 2:58
14. Mick Jagger Interview – 3:15
15. Julie Christie Interview – 0:46
16. Michael Caine Interview – 1:30
17. Chris Farlowe – “Paint It, Black” (Jagger/Richard) – 3:29
18. Alan Aldridge Interview – 0:46
19. Chris Farlowe – “Paint It, Black” (Instrumental Reprise) (Jagger/Richard) – 0:13
20. David Hockney Interview – 0:09
21. Small Faces – “Here Comes the Nice” (Marriott/Lane) – 3:01
22. Lee Marvin Interview – 0:45
23. Pink Floyd – “Interstellar Overdrive (Reprise)” (Barrett) – 0:55
24. Allen Ginsberg – “Tonite Let’s All Make Love In London” (Ginsberg) – 1:08


johnkatsmc5, welcome music..