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Monday, 13 February 2017

Anno Domini “On This New Day"1971 Irish Progressive/Folk Rock with Tiger Taylor (ex Eire Apparent)


Anno Domini “On This New Day"1971 mega rare & excellent Irish  Progressive/Folk Rock
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Limited vinyl release of a 1971 album from the band formed by Tiger Taylor (ex Eire Apparent).
This mildly folk/psych-flavoured album is incredibly hard to find in its original form: therefore, this vinyl reissue is a must for fans of melodic acoustic rock. Features a great version of Roger McGuinn's "So You Want To Be A Rock 'n' Roll Star" with some decent fuzz guitar work......~
Rare UK psych folk, originally released in 1971. This album makes one think, how the BYRDS would have sounded if they came from the UK. It contains mostly original songs, combining melodic folk and great voices. ....~
Vinyl reissue of rare and sought-after UK psych-folk album from 1971. Formed in Ireland by Tiger Taylor (Ex Eire Apparent), their album makes one think of what the Byrds would have sounded had they been British. Mostly original songs, although they do a brilliant cover of "So you want to be a rock'n'roll star", the record combines melodic folk tunes with other guitar-drenched rockers; great voices and delicious original songs. If you like the Byrds but are a fan of British psychedelia, this is for you. Limited edition of 500 copies with original artwork.....~
Rare and sought-after UK Psych-folk album from 1971. Formed in Ireland by Tiger Taylor (Ex Eire Apparent), their album makes one think of what the Byrds would have sounded had they been British. Mostly original songs, although they do a brilliant cover of "So you want to be a Rock'n'Roll star", the record combines melodic folk tunes with other guitar-drenched rockers; great voices and delicious original songs. If you like the Byrds but are a fan of British psychedelia, this is for you.Limited edition of 500 copies with original artwork.....
Incredibly hard-to-find, this highly coveted Holy Grail and folk-rock-psych masterpiece (a guaranteed original UK first issue/pressing) features sizzling riffs from former Eire Apparent lead guitarist Tiger Taylor, some stunning fuzz and dual lead guitar work throughout, and multiple highlights .....including a superb version of The Byrds' "Rock 'n Roll Star".
The album combines melodic folk tunes with guitar-drenched rockers, great vocal harmonies, 3 stunning covers and 7 delicious original songs.
Recorded late in 1970, the band's only LP was initially released only in the UK in April of 1971, but with little fanfare, no singles (in the UK) to promote the album and miniscule sales back home, the band did manage to stir up a little interest in Germany (following some local touring there)....leading to the release of the much-more common German version of the LP later that same year (Polydor 2310 096, which featured completely different cover artwork).
Clearly influenced by The Byrds, the album begins with some absolutely killer dual-guitars on the McGuinn-Hillman classic "So You Want To Be A Rock'n'Roll Star" that, arguably, even manages to outshine the guitar work of McGuinn's original version. "Bad Lands Of Ardguth" is full of ringing guitars, .....there are more awesome dual lead guitars on Cocker's "Hitchcock Railway", ....then there's a heavy rockin' version of Dion's little-known "Daddy Rowlin" .....and the album boasts several great melodic folky Mercer-Scott originals like "The Trapper", "June Tremayne" and "The Good Life I Have Known"....~

Anno Domini's only LP is a pretty diverse sounding totality. Some of the songs are soft and folk oriented while the others are more hard rock sounding. The album also includes some psychedelic elements. I enjoy this album quite much and some of these songs are damn beautiful. For example take a look at the B-side tracks "The Good Life I Have Known" and "The Trapper" and you'll see what I mean. 

Most of the time this record sounds very enjoyable but there are a couple of weaker tracks as well. I'll rate this album with 3,5 stars out of five but I almost gave it four stars. The best parts here are indeed really strong but the album is still a little bit inconsistent....by..CooperBolan ...~ 


Anno Domini was exactly the kind of band I once abhorred and avoided: vaguely British folk and vaguely psychedelic, but only in that post-Beatles way where they attempt to halfass some Indian or multinationalism into their music to pass it off as psychedelics or nag champa scented when really it's just a bunch of smelly hippies that smell like every other '71 Volkswagen that one (ONE) of their rich uncles happened to bestow upon them just to get the whole pack to leave them alone. Stoners in the 1970s. I know that music is cleverly bound with memory and with being loved, so I imagine a lot of these craggy dime-a-dozen psychedelic rock albums have all kinds of lays and Woodstock field handjobs associated with On This New Day. Or albums just like it that nobody would have told the difference between, because this is just about everything one could want. Smooth smoooooooth licks off the Hendrix homage machine, a quasi-feminine side with its folk sensibilities even though they were just feeling a bit extra oxytocin after that last Art Garfunkel flick, and again as mentioned, getting your doodle diddled out in public in the early '70s while tetrahydrocannabinol kisses the both of you from the inside-out. 

That's why people like a lot of this. It told me so. The messages in this are as vague as can be and that's why it's so far behind in the mix, but the good they did a generation with helping The Byrds find themselves was apparently a good struggle to help too. I never liked The Byrds much and would have seen Anno Domini play before them, but truthfully, this is the sort of thing that plays languidly in my head when I question whether or not I like the '70s for their spirit or for their fixation on and against sex. What a thing that decade must have been for the first world. This is the hazy bong rip out of some smelly van riders' lungs and into the face of some non-smoker, an unwelcome and uncalled-for display that's so mildly psychedelic that you'll wonder if it was something else. Then you'll panic. Then you'll start to bad trip. Then you'll wake up later with "June Tremayne" playing and you'll realize that you'd just passed out with how boring the halfway of this record is. 

It's okay though. Again, remember my lack of association culturally to this sound and that there are some that live for this. I gave[ i]Forever Changes[/i] like two stars, so, use that as a gauge for my credibility. This doesn't do it like I thought it did and has actually been less interesting than it was on the first day. That's... something that shouldn't happen...by...Vito_James...~ 







Personnel: 
David «Tiger» Taylor — lead guitar, acoustic guitar, vocals 
Kerry Scott — congas, harmonica, vocals 
David Mercer — rhythm guitar, bass, vocals 

John Evan-Jones — lead guitar 
Trevor «Gypsy» Jones — bass 
Billy Kennedy — producer 


Tracklist 

1 So You Want To Be A Rock 'N Roll Star 
2 On This New Day 
3 Bad Lands Of Ardguth 
4 Regency Days 
5 Hitchcock Railway 
6 This Good Life I Have Known 
7 The Trapper 
8 Daddy Rowlin 
9 Five O'Clock In The Morning 
10 June Tremayne 

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