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14 Feb 2017

The Mystery Trend "So Glad I Found You" 1966-67 US Psychedelic Folk Rock consists primarily of previously unreleased tracks.







The Mystery Trend  "So Glad I Found You" 1966-67 US Psychedelic Folk Rock  consists primarily of previously unreleased tracks. 
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They preferred alcohol to acid, tight arrangements to lengthy jams, and went to college while others dropped out. So what were they doing on the mid-'60s San Francisco rock scene? Named after a misheard lyric from Dylan's "Like a Rolling Stone," the Mystery Trend paid infrequent visits to the studio, releasing only one single during two years together, but gained the respect of fellow Frisco ballroom bands such as the Great Society. This collection of all of Mystery Trend's known studio recordings and usable demo performances documents the brief history of one of the great lost bands of the '60s. 

The Trend's precision-arranged two-minute masterpieces were mostly self-penned, the two exceptions being Smiley Lewis' "Shame, Shame, Shame (Miss Roxie)" and a quaint Americanized version of "Substitute"-where the band takes great pains to avoid Townshend's lyric about the subject's dad being black! "There it Happened Again" has an almost Bacharach-like middle eight; "House on the Hill" has sinister undertones lurking behind that whimsical facade. A little ragged on the harmonies, perhaps, but up there with the best of the '60s garage set. The only mystery about the Mystery Trend is why these nuggets weren't issued the first time around. 

this albums come from the mid-1960s vaults of Frank Werber's Trident Productions - the band was renowned as one of the first alternative rock groups from San Francisco, with artful, accomplished sound, similiar to the Zombies, Kinks or Lovin' Spoonful..................... 

The Mystery Trend’s name has proved appropriate in defining their fate. They were a band that lots of rock music scholars have heard of — mentioned in lots of essays about San Francisco in the mid-’60s — but never heard. The Mystery Trend never recorded much professionally, and a lot of what they did was in the realm of works-in-progress, rather than finished pieces of music. The group’s other big problem was that their sound wasn’t too much in sync with the music most people associate with mid-’60s San Francisco. They started out doing R&B based music, then gravitated toward the Beatles, the Kinks, the Zombies, and Lovin’ Spoonful, but they never really sounded like any other band. Their 21-song compilation, “So Glad I Found You”, finally presents their legacy properly, including all of their 1966-67 Trident studio recordings, as well as some demos and even a solo demo apiece by Ron Nagle and guitarist Bob Cuff. More often they’re intriguing oddball art-pop-rock with a dash of psychedelia. – Bruce Eder, Richie Unterberger 

Ron’s apprenticeship as a pop maverick amongst the self-absorbed hordes of 60s San Francisco in his legendary combo The Mystery Trend can be full appreciated on the Trend anthology So Glad I Found You, which gathers together all the studio sessions for Frank Werber’s Trident imprint, as well as some fascinating home recordings, 1965-1967............... 

The Mystery Trend have been more a legend than a band since their dissolution, although some lo-fi unreleased tapes have made the rounds on the collectors' circuit. This 21-song compilation finally presents their legacy properly, including all of their 1966-67 Trident studio recordings, as well as some demos and even a solo demo apiece by Ron Nagle and guitarist Bob Cuff. Although some of the tunes are run-of-the-mill period rock, more often they're intriguing oddball art-pop-rock with a dash of psychedelia. "Words You Whisper" and "Ten Empty Cups" have a wistful, keyboard-grounded air that will seduce any Zombies fan, while the similar but poppier "There It Happened Again" is something like L.A. sunshine pop played with guts and imagination. Other cuts give you more of the weirdness you'd expect from a mid-1960s San Francisco band, as in the anxious melody, dread-infused words, and constant stops and starts of "Mercy Killing"; the lovely, lilting jazzy instrumental "Mambo for Marion"; and the ominous but tuneful "What If I" and "Lose Some Dreams" (which are like a darker Zombies). It's too bad that more of the pre-Trident demos that have been heard by collectors on unreleased tapes were not included, as some of them are quite up to par with the Trident sessions in the quality of the songwriting (if not fidelity), although a couple of them do appear on the cd. Richie Unterberger........ 

Personnel 
Larry Bennett - bass 
Bob Cuff - vocals, guitar 
John Gregory - guitar 
John Luby - drums, vocals 
Ron Nagle - organ, piano, vocals, clavinet 
Larry West - guitar 

001. Carl Street (02:51) 
002. So Glad I Found You (02:20) 
003. Words You Whisper (02:23) 
004. Johnny Was A Good Boy (02:44) 
005. One Day For Two (02:08) 
006. Carrots On A String (01:57) 
007. Ten Empty Cups (02:21) 
008. Mercy Killing (03:02) 
009. Mambo For Marion (02:03) 
010. Substitute (03:00) 
011. There It Happened Again (02:28) 
012. House On The Hill (02:22) 
013. From The Collection Of Dorothy (02:14) 
014. What If I (02:46) 
015. Wake Up Cryin' (03:00) 
016. Lose Some Dreams (03:03) 
017. Empty Shoes (04:08) 
018. Let Me See With My Eyes (05:51) 

johnkatsmc5, welcome music..

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