body{ text-shadow: 0px 0px 4px rgba(150, 150, 150, 1); }

30 Mar 2017

Cheryl Dilcher "Butterfly" 1973 US Folk Pop Rock






Cheryl Dilcher "Butterfly" 1973 US Folk Pop Rock

full

"Every record company should have its own Melanie if it wants one; now A&M has its. Whatever does it for you." M.A. (Morgan Ames) [High Fidelity, Nov. 1973, p. 155].............

"In Cheryl Dilcher, A. & M. have Franc's female counterpart. It's possible that she could have made more impact if Melanie, whom she resembles vocally, hadn't got there first. Still, she has the redoubtable Jeff Barry producing her--which could help her on her way. In the meantime she just about deserves A:2 for her efforts, which she can share with Peter Franc." [Hi Fi News & Record Review, Dec. 1973, p. 2633.].................

With two tremendous late 60s style femme-psychrock tracks this is Dilcher's most interesting LP, and while the rest of the album goes in an eclectic singer/songwriter direction the entire LP is enjoyable with excellent lyrics and a cool attitude. Packaging is apex for 70s fans too. Dilcher made several LPs that fall outside the scope of the Archives although it should be noted that her debut "Special Songs" from 1971 marks the first known appearance of Bette Midler! [PL]..................

This is by far Dilcher's best album, and due to the inclusion of the two hot funk-rock songs "All Woman" and "High" on the "Hippie Goddesses" compilation, the one that has received the most attention. Those two songs are musically unlike the rest of the album, but still fit as part of a cohesive thematic whole. The overall musical style retains a few remnants of her folk rock debut SPECIAL SONGS, but is more electric and melodic. At times it would almost resemble bubblegum if not for Dilcher's tough, gravely voice. That's not necessarily a bad thing, though, because this is a wholly well-written and extremely catchy record, one that grew on me and stayed in regular playing rotation for a long time in my home. The blend of styles (pop and singer/songwriter) probably puzzled listeners who took themselves too seriously, which is the only logical explanation for the album's commercial failure. It's hard to imagine fans of, say, Janis Ian's BETWEEN THE LINES, loosening up and enjoying a song like "Chocolate Candy," even though a close look at the lyrics reveals intelligence and depth beyond Ian's more calculated album. Besides, Ian hadn't written a hook like that in "Good Morning World" since she was 15. Finally, the harder rocking appeal of "All Woman" and "High" give this album an edge that other singer/songwriters sorely lacked. In a way, the closest comparison is early Melanie, as she also combines a gravely voice with a sweet demeanor, and her first few albums occasionally rocked out ("Uptown And Down," "Lovin Baby Girl,") Dilcher is a little bit wilder and more dangerous, though, as BUTTERFLY came after the flower child dream has been destroyed, not while it was still within reach. BUTTERFLY is one of the finest singer-songwriter albums of all, an explosion of talent where least expected. Dilcher's other albums, most of which compromised her style in hope of achieving commercial success, are spotty and nowhere near as good as this, but all of them have an interesting moment or two. [AM] [The Acid Archives of Underground Sounds, 1965-1982...lysergia acid archives............

This was a very pleasant surprise from an artist I was not familiar with. Somehow, it ended up on my want list, recommended by God knows who. When I attend a record fair, if I come upon a dealer carrying my style of music, I shove my 12-page want list in his hand while I start perusing, so he can save me some time pulling out what he knows he has from it. When one guy handed me this, I looked at it, and then back at him, thinking there must be some mistake. But he showed it to me on my list, so I took it. As I'm listening, I felt I could see what this was all about. Most of the material is in the typical hippy-chick folk/rock vein that artists such as Melanie are known for. But Dilcher's song writing style has an edge to it that makes it stand out, comparatively. There are two atypical psych influenced rockers that make this particular release of her's a collectible by genre fans. It is these two tracks that are the best of the collection, in my opinion. But it's nice to know that there is some other stuff on here beyond those two cuts that are worth getting into......tymeshifter ..........

Though there's no denying namesake Cheryl Dilcher was cute, when I stumbled across this album at a yardsale I didn't have a clue who she was. As a result I bought the album based on the Jeff Barry connection. In carrying a dedicated to Barry, he produced this album and was credited with playing percussion throughout. 

Judging by the title and cutesy packaging (butterflies, kittens, etc.) my initial thoughts were that 1973's "Butterfly" was liable to be little more than a collection of cloyingly earnest singer/songwriter tracks; maybe something along the lines of early Janis Ian, Melanie, or Carly Simon. The other thought was that this would turn out to be throwaway pop - Barry having found a cute, young woman whom he was willing to mentor for awhile. Well, technically I wasn't completely wrong with the initial assessment. Listening to the album it turned out that Dilcher actually did sound a bit like a slightly pissed off Melanie and on tracks like 'Sweet Mama', 'Rainbow Farm' and 'So Sad' her material could have been mistaken for something off of one of Melanie's mid-1970s albums (check out side two's 'Irma' or 'Chocolate Candy' if you doubt the comparison). Like Melanie, Dilcher owned a deep and raspy voice that wasn't the most musical thing you ever heard, but proved to be well suited to her material and grew on you with a couple of spins. Similarly I wasn't completely off target with respect to Jeff Barry's influence. Though all twelve tracks were Dilcher originals and nothing here was overtly bubblegum, Barry's commercial touch was evident throughout the set. 

Unknown to me at the time, this one's generated a cult following among psych collectors. Turns out that 'High' and 'All Woman' were included in a bootleg compilation entitled "Hippie Goddesses". While it's easy to see why they were included (fuzz guitar and a far more rock oriented attack than the rest of the set), musically those tracks were quite atypical. Too bad, since they were amongst the collection's standout performances. ....by... RDTEN1 ..............

Judging by the title and cutesy packaging (butterflies, kittens, etc.) my initial thoughts were that 1973's "Butterfly" was liable to be little more than a collection of cloyingly earnest singer/songwriter tracks; maybe something along the lines of early Janis Ian, Melanie, or Carly Simon. The other thought was that this would turn out to be throwaway pop - Barry having found a cute, young woman whom he was willing to mentor for awhile. Well, technically I wasn't completely wrong with the initial assessment. Listening to the album it turned out that Dilcher actually did sound a bit like a slightly pissed off Melanie and on tracks like 'Sweet Mama', 'Rainbow Farm' and 'So Sad' her material could have been mistaken for something off of one of Melanie's mid-1970s albums (check out side two's 'Irma' or 'Chocolate Candy' if you doubt the comparison). Like Melanie, Dilcher owned a deep and raspy voice that wasn't the most musical thing you ever heard, but proved to be well suited to her material and grew on you with a couple of spins. Similarly I wasn't completely off target with respect to Jeff Barry's influence. Though all twelve tracks were Dilcher originals and nothing here was overtly bubblegum, Barry's commercial touch was evident throughout the set. 

Unknown to me at the time, this one's generated a cult following among psych collectors. Turns out that 'High' and 'All Woman' were included in a bootleg compilation entitled "Hippie Goddesses". While it's easy to see why they were included (fuzz guitar and a far more rock oriented attack than the rest of the set), musically those tracks were quite atypical. Too bad, since they were amongst the collection's standout performances. ...Bad Cat............. 

- Jeff Barry -- percussion 
- Max Bennett -- bass 
- George Bohannon -- trombone 
- Jack Conrad -- bass 
- Cheryl Dilcher -- vocals, guitar 
- Ed Green -- drums, percussion 
- Clarence McDonald -- keyboards 
- Mike Melvoin -- keyboards 
- Art Munson -- lead guitar 
- Chuck Rainey -- bass 
- David Walker -- lead guitar

Tracklist 
A1 Butterfly 
A2 Deep Down Inside 
A3 Sweet Mama 
A4 Rainbow Farm 
A5 So Sad 
A6 Can't Get Enough Of You 
B1 Irma 
B2 High 
B3 Good Morning World 
B4 Once Upon A Crime 
B5 Chocolate Candy 
B6 All Woman

johnkatsmc5, welcome music..

volume

volume

Fuzz

Fuzz

Cassete Deck

Cassete Deck