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26 Mar 2017

Doris “Did You Give The World Some Love Today, Baby" 1970 Swedish Jazz,Funk,Soul,Psych






Doris “Did You Give The World Some Love Today, Baby" 1970 Swedish Jazz,Funk,Soul,Psych
full
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8h4wkZAedkI

Highly recommended reissue of the classic Swedish psych LP from 1970 with 3 amazing mod/psych party tunes! Essential!….

This was Doris’ jazz album though it contains more than a hint of Joni Mitchell, Led Zepellin and the like. Backed by her husband Lukas Lindholm on bass she was able to lay down some seriously funky bass lines on tracks like Don’t and Beatmaker. On You Never Come Closer, an experimental track that was way ahead of its time, Janne Carlssonunleashes a fearsome sound on drums helped by Bernot Egerladh on organ…….

This LP marks the highlight in the career of a talented Nordic blond vocalist - Doris Svensson from Gothenburg, Sweden. It seems as though she’s finally managed to find and record a set of songs that suit her 100%. Maybe this isn’t surprising when you consider the musical genius that went into writing and scoring the album. Most of the material was written and arranged by TV producer, jazz-pianist, composer, “rarely-out-of-the-news-man-about-town” Berndt Egerbladh. Lyrical assistance was generously provided by a 6 foot kiltless Scottish giant, Francis Cowan. Francis also plays the cello on a few tracks which explains why he’s kiltless. Anyway, quite a combination which gave a fantastic result, with a little help from the producer Håkan Sterner. Incidentally, Håkan found the job so exciting that he was forced to retreat behind a beard after its completion.
Doris’ album provides 36 minutes of qualified musical jou guaranteed to satisfy all tastes. Discotheques will find that two numbers in particular, “Don’t” and “Beatmaker” are good box office draws. Jazz die-hards might even start visiting discotheques after digesting “I wish I knew” and “I’m pushing you out”. Note too an incredible ballad called “Daisies” and tell me if Sweden hasn’t produced a dangerous competitor for Melanie.

Once again, this LP’s got something for everybody, the best of underground, jazz, rock and folk - not mixed up in one gigantic hotch-potch, but all in gentle harmony. Listen to Doris - a good time will be has by all.
–Roger Wallis………..

A vintage pop oddity of sorts, but one that’s worthwhile for its musical content at least as much as its curiosity value, the lone LP by Swedish chanteuse Doris (née Svensson) is an accomplished and somewhat offbeat collection of lush pop, soul, and light funk. Cut in 1970 with a handful of veteran Swedish jazz and rock musicians who sound completely at home playing in a variety of primarily American idioms, Did You Give the World Some Love Today Baby reveals Doris to be a singer of considerable range with plenty of personality. She’s a throaty belter on the funky, country-inflected “Waiting at the Station,” the Northern soul-styled groovers “Don’t” and “Beatmaker,” and the brassy pop-soul title tune (even coming off a bit worryingly unhinged as she exhorts “you’ve got to love the one you love/and the whole darn world as well”) – but she scales back the fireworks for sweet, if somewhat fey, ballads like “Grey Rain of Sweden” and “Daisies,” which call to mind the sophisticated songwriter pop of fellow lost gem Margo Guryan. There’s also a heartfelt, tastefully orchestrated rendition of the Band’s “Whispering Pines,” and – easily the album’s most unusual moment – the bizarre, unsettling jazz-psychedelia of “You Never Come Close,” which sounds like nothing you’d expect to hear on an ostensibly pop record from any era (it evokes something similar to Portishead’s enigmatic melancholy, or Candie Payne’s tormented retro-pop noir, several decades down the line.) Add in a smattering of upbeat big-band swing tunes – “I’m Pushing You Out” and the organ-led shuffle “I Wish I Knew” – the goofy, vaudeville-ish “Won’t You Take Me to the Theatre,” and a jaunty cover of Harry Nilsson’s “Bath,” and you’ve got a true smorgasbord – a little something for everybody, although it’s all still quite listenable as a single entity. The world may not have given Doris much love in her day, but she’s certainly comparable in terms of raw vocal ability to would-be peers like Lulu and Petula Clark – or, as the liner notes suggest, Melanie – arguably outstripping them in the adventurousness of her musical range (in a single album, no less), and is outfitted here with perfectly decent if not necessarily exceptional material. Worth rediscovering, particularly since several CD reissues have made it readily available….allmusic……….

Doris is best known for her lone solo album, eclectic pop, rock and funk Did You Give the World Some Love Today Baby recorded in 1970.
Her singing career began in 1960 by recording an album with the Swedish band The Strangers. She went on recording with Plums, including the tracks “You Made a Fool of Me Last Night” and “Wouldn’t That Be Groovy”, and The Dandys, including “Go Back to Daddy”.
In April 1970, Doris went to record in the EMI studios of Stockholm. Most of the lyrics of the songs were by Scottish writer Francis Cowan. The material was composed by TV producer, jazz-pianist, and composer Berndt Egerbladh. He also provided the big band brass arrangements for the tracks.The heavy drumming on the trackswas performed by Janne Carlsson from the duo Hansson & Karlsson, and the bass was played by Doris’s husband Lukas Lindholm. The album Did You Give the World Some Love Today Baby was issued by Odeon in Sweden, 1970.
The promotional singles distributed in U.K. and France in 1970 attracted little attention among the audiences. The Montreal Mirror newsweekly reviewed it as:”A relic of epic Swedish pop from ’70. Perfectly hilarious and hilariously perfect.” The Sunday Times reviewed the song’s instrumental and vocal style as:”…Hendrix backing Björk.” The Blaxploitation.com database listed Did You Give the World Some Love Today Baby among the Forty Essential Funk Albums of the music history.
“You Never Come Closer” was sampled on “Closer” by influential hip-hop producer Madlib for Quasimoto…………

Originally released on EMI Sweden, original copies of this album still change hands in excess of $500. This was Doris’ jazz album though it contains more than a hint of Joni Mitchell, Led Zepellin and the like. Backed by her husband Lukas Lindholm on bass she was able to lay down some seriously funky bass lines on tracks like Don’t and Beatmaker. On You Never Come Closer, an experimental track that was way ahead of its time, Janne Carlsson unleashes a fearsome sound on drums helped by Bernot Egerladh on organ.

“This brand-new repress of our tenth release uses a new master and carefully restored artwork we created from original copies, to bring you the highest quality reproduction possible. We very proud of it, we hope you enjoy it as much as we do.”…………………….

It was initially released in Sweden in 1970 by Swedish singer Doris {Svensson}, but did not get much attention until its re-issue in the 90’s. This album is a diverse collection of covers and also songs that I think may have been written for her by a songwriting team of Francis Cowan and Berndt Egerbladh.
Wikipedia lists its genres as “pop, soul, funk, and psychedelia”. That basically sums it up except I would add “jazz” to the list. The album does indeed have an interesting paraphernalia of songs, from the strange siren-wails and psychedelia of ‘You Never Come Closer’, to soft ballads such as 'Grey Rain of Sweden, to the almost western fiddles of 'Waiting at the Station’, to the big band arrangements of half the songs… it epitomizes eclectic. Even Doris’s voice is uncommon. At times she sounds like a child but her voice has a rougher side that banishes any such thoughts. And to top it all off, the cover is one of the most befuddling I’ve ever seen.
Like I said, it’s an odd album. Still, it is strangely addicting and is both an amusing and gratifying listen. My favourite song is definitely the title track, 'Did You Give the World Some Love Today, Baby’. There is nothing terribly strange about this song, it’s one of the more conventional ones on the album.
On itunes this song is included on a “Go Green” compilation which is interesting since it’s not about “loving the earth” bu rather about loving the people of the world. It was recorded in 1970 after all. Those compilators must have not listened to the lyrics. :P…………….

Tracklist
Did You Give The World Some Love Today,Baby 3:18
I Wish I Knew 2:23
Grey Rain Of Sweden 2:56
Waiting At The Station 3:05
Don’t 3:11
Daisies 2:11
You Never Come Closer 4:18
Whispering Pine 3:47
I’m Pushing You Out 2:50
Won’t You Take Me To The Theatre 2:24
Beatmaker 3:30
Bath 

johnkatsmc5, welcome music..