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4 Mar 2017

Luis Pérez “Ipan In Xiktli Metzli, México Mágico Cósmico, En El Ombligo De La Luna” 1981 Mexico Folk Rock,Electronic,World,Art Rock,Prog.Cosmic







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Luis Pérez “Ipan In Xiktli Metzli, México Mágico Cósmico, En El Ombligo De La Luna” 1981 Mexico Folk Rock,Electronic,World,Art Rock,Prog.Cosmic
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**Hand-numbered edition of 500 housed in gold ink screen-printed jacket and Spanish liner notes** The highly promising Sacred Summits label debuts with a reissue of Luis Perez's private-pressed cosmic obscurity, 'Ipan In Xiktli Metztli'. Beautifully recorded in Mexico, 1981, it offers a mescaline-sharp vision of deep grooving "cosmic ethnography" combining pre-Colombian percussion and wind instruments with electric guitar, tape delay and synths in free-roaming and extended suites. Perez's background in well-known (in Mexico, at least) folk ensemble Huayucaltia evidently feeds into this, one of only two known solo albums, but the key descriptor is blatantly psychedelic. The side opens with a pair of concise, light-footed groovers, all rattlesnake shakers and melodic percussive cadence rent upwards with astral wind instruments and richly evocative nocturnal atmosphere, seemingly preparing us for two extended trips coming off like a prime Jodorowsky soundtrack. The first, 'Etimología Del Nombre Mexico' projects ritualist prog grooves into a haunting soundsphere of synth swirl and chant awash with tape delay and riding the wave between lush ecstasy and abyssal darkness while the 2nd suite, 'Al Culto Solar' peers further still with truly desolate, shivering synth atmospheres pierced by a comforting voice which leads further into the "other" side and a phantasmic array of patterned basslines, demonic wail and utterly mind-blowing synth hallucinations. Serious stuff, treat with care for celestial rewards...............

One of the earliest examples of "Prehispanic Fusion," a style combining the pre-colonial music of Mexico with modern electronics and progressive rock, channeling the spirit of ancient cultures. The style later gained broader recognition with Jorge Reyes, Antonio Zepeda and others. En el Ombligo de la Luna is pretty much where it all started. The first track "In Alteptl Tonal" introduces the percussion, ancient wooden flutes and bird-whistles that form the cornerstone of this style, but as the album progresses modern instrumentation is slowly introduced; electric guitars, then synthesizers and bass are in full deployment by the middle of the third track that closed side one of the original LP, along with wordless vocalizing. The side-long title suite features many haunting quiet parts that can thankfully now be heard clearly, utilizing winds, layered percussion, guitars, and synths, building slowly to a climax, followed by a short section of ancient poetry, leading into the spirited midsection where pulsating bass mixes with jagged synth sounds, morphing into a magnificent passage for layered synths. The closing section then reintroduces the percussion and flutes from the opening section. This is most welcome reissue, especially given that most Mexican LP pressings of the 1980s were very noisy, full of clicks and pops and other irregularities. While the limitations of the original analog recording are still audible on a very close listen, all of those horrible pressing issues are now gone; what remains is one of the magical gems of Mexican progressive music sounding better than it ever has before.
by Jon Davis, 2013-12-10: ..........................

I would imagine that when this album was first released back in 1981, people referred to it as "timeless." It starts out with a wooden flute and a wide array of shakers and other percussion, and in the listener's imagination, it's something that could have been recorded 500 years ago if the technology had existed to record it. The second track continues with wooden flute and percussion, though it concentrates more on drums and wooden sounds than on shakers; there's also something that sounds like a conch shell being blown. The credits (as far as my Spanish will get me) merely say that all instruments are of Pre-Columbian origin with the exception of guitar, bass, echo chambers, frequency analyzer, phase shifter, sin-ei (not sure what that is, maybe a synthesizer, since I'd swear I hear one), and gong. The modern instruments start appearing on the third track, but Pérez handles the transition so smoothly that it's not jarring. About five minutes into "Ketzakoatl Yauh Miktlan" he develops a groove reminiscent of Mike Oldfield, which isn't a bad reference point since both are multi-instrumentalists who build up music part by part in the studio. The way Pérez combines these ancient and modern instruments seems perfectly natural, which leads to another "timeless" factor — this is music not rooted in any particular time, which could exist anywhere on the timeline from ancient times into the future. In some ways, En el Ombligo de la Luna is a precursor to some World Music, but I wouldn't push that comparison too far. This recording stands on its own regardless of its innovation at the time of original release, another way in which it is "timeless..............................

The intruments were played in the album are from pre-colombian culture and design from the several regions of the Mexican Country. "Expresión de cultura musical, fomento sostenido por el ISSSTE, subdirección de Acción Cultural". México 1981. ...............

This tantalising prospect of a label splashes down with an amazing LP self-released by Luis Perez in 1981 within his native Mexico only. A kind of cosmic ethnography combining pre-Columbian percussion and wind instruments together with guitar, tape delay units and analogue synthesisers: a mystical weft of giddily deep grooves and experimentation. A limited edition beautifully presented in numbered, silk-screened sleeves with notes......................

The highly promising Sacred Summits label debuts with a reissue of Luis Perez's private-pressed cosmic obscurity, 'Ipan In Xiktli Metztli'. Beautifully recorded in Mexico, 1981, it offers a mescaline-sharp vision of deep grooving "cosmic ethnography" combining pre-Colombian percussion and wind instruments with electric guitar, tape delay and synths in free-roaming and extended suites. Perez's background in well-known (in Mexico, at least) folk ensemble Huayucaltia evidently feeds into this, one of only two known solo albums, but the key descriptor is blatantly psychedelic. The side opens with a pair of concise, light-footed groovers, all rattlesnake shakers and melodic percussive cadence rent upwards with astral wind instruments and richly evocative nocturnal atmosphere, seemingly preparing us for two extended trips coming off like a prime Jodorowsky soundtrack. The first, 'Etimología Del Nombre Mexico' projects ritualist prog grooves into a haunting soundsphere of synth swirl and chant awash with tape delay and riding the wave between lush ecstasy and abyssal darkness while the 2nd suite, 'Al Culto Solar' peers further still with truly desolate, shivering synth atmospheres pierced by a comforting voice which leads further into the "other" side and a phantasmic array of patterned basslines, demonic wail and utterly mind-blowing synth hallucinations. Serious stuff, treat with care for celestial rewards.
Boomkat

In the early 1980s, there was a small explosion of interesting and very unique progressive music coming out of Mexico. One of the paths being explored at that time was music that fused progressive music and ambient music with the instruments of pre-Hispanic Mexico; the sounds BEFORE the conquerors came and changed the continent hugely. The bigger names in the field were Suso Saiz and Jorge Reyes, but one of the first people to release a record that gained attention outside of Mexico was Luis Perez, who released this album in 1981.
"This tantalizing prospect of a label splashes down with an amazing LP first released by Luis Perez in 1981, originally within his native country of Mexico only. A kind of cosmic ethnography combining pre-Columbian percussion and wind instruments together with guitar, tape delay units, and analog synthesizers: a mystical weft of giddily deep grooves and experimentation. A limited edition beautifully presented in numbered, silk-screened sleeves, with notes."
Wayside,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

Credits:

Cover – Laurence Giordano
Executive Producer – ISSSTE
Music By, Arranged By, Performer – Luis Pérez
Recording Supervisor – Fernando Roldán, Francisco Miranda

Tracklist
A1 Suite Al Culto Solar - In Altepetl Tonal 3:19
A2 Suite Al Culto Solar - Xochiyaoyoloh 5:32
A3 Suite Al Culto Solar - Ketzalkoatl Yauh Miktlan 14:34
B1 Ipan In Xiktli Metztli 21:21 

johnkatsmc5, welcome music..