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27 Apr 2017

Rich Mountain Tower “Rich Mountain Tower” 1971 US Psych Folk,Country Rock








Rich Mountain Tower “Rich Mountain Tower” 1971 US excellent Psych Folk,Country Rock
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"Rich Mountain Tower's debut self-titled album, released in the fall of 1971, combines southern rock with acoustic ballads and psychedelic flourishes to create a sound well ahead of its time. Originally issued in quadrophonic sound, it's a superb recording that shows just what a fine and underrated band this Tennessee quintet was.

Really, though, these folks are mainly anchored in psychedelic folk, with a driving, rock rhythm and lots of jangly guitars and Southern-style slide balancing out the nascent twang. The lyrics are very hippie-dippie and diffuse, spacy, celebratory stuff about being alive and in nature, sung in airy harmonies with pedal steel an 12-string guitar providing sweet counterpoint -- all in all, a very Byrds-y sound.

A few Nashville studio pros were brought in to beef up the band's sound -- Charlie McCoy lays down a few hot harmonica riffs, and steel player Weldon Myrick adds gorgeous accompaniment throughout. There's not a lot on here that I would call "country," as opposed to rock, and a few songs may get irritating if you're just in search of country sounds, although for psych/folk-freak fans this record is a real treat. A mixed bag, but a great document of its time.
Slipcue.....................

Rich Mountain Tower was a band from Tennessee. They put out three album, this one being their debut. Released in 1971, this is Southern Rock avant la lettre, really. The album has more similarities with Crosby, Stills & Nash than any Allman Brothers album. People that enjoy The Ozark Mountain Daredevils may very well enjoy this too. Some great harmonies and, if you can look past the hippie sensibilities of this album, some wonderful songs, that are sure to grow on you. Since there is hardly any information about this band to be found on the web, I will give you all the information provided to me by Pete, who sent this rip. Thanks Pete!.............

Rich Mountain Tower's debut self-titled album, released in the fall of 1971, combines southern rock with acoustic ballads and psychedelic flourishes to create a sound well ahead of its time. Originally issued in quadrophonic sound, it's a superb recording that shows just what a fine and underrated band this Tennessee quintet was, now reissued on CD for the first time. Includes detailed liner notes and images. Digitally remastered............

his is one of the sadder stories of modern music. Not tragic sad, but just neglectfully sad. Rich Mountain Tower's country folk rock tinged effort of 1971 was released with some fanfare as an early attempt at Quadraphonic recording. The album got decent critical acclaim, but as far as I know the release went more into the realm of legend and regional cult status than receiving best seller levels. Sad because this album deserved to be recognized as a classic.

The songs are all wonderful--everyone of them. The performances are impeccable. This album shines in every way. If you haven't heard the Tower, then you are missing out. This music is rich...........ByArlee Bird................

Hard to pin down, this Tennessee band mixes country-rock musings (in the style of the Dead or Mountain Bus) with progressive experiments that occasionally recall a better-tutored Majic Ship, or even Elton John. Side one flies out of the traps with scorching opener ‘Uncle Bob White’, with furiously strummed acoustic guitars, tambourine and the best harmonica playing this side of Stevie Wonder. ‘Thank You, Maggie’ ain’t bad either, with its considered melody and subtle electronics. ‘Our Passage Home’, which closes the side, is also noteworthy, mining a truly progressive seam with its McCartney-style bass lines, time-changes, acid guitar and strings. The album is less interesting on the generic country-rock numbers, and I’d like to have heard more of the electronica that graces ‘Song Of The Sea’, for instance, but this is certainly a grower. Perhaps the strangest thing about the record is the fact it features a male lead singer called Dana; one can only imagine the ribbing he got in the playground. .......

 Rich Mountain Tower was a band from Tennessee. They put out three album, this one being their debut. Released in 1971, this is Southern Rock avant la lettre, really. The album has more similarities with Crosby, Stills & Nash than any Allman Brothers album. People that enjoy The Ozark Mountain Daredevils may very well enjoy this too. Some great harmonies and, if you can look past the hippie sensibilities of this album, some wonderful songs, that are sure to grow on you............

The Rich Mountain Tower
*Dana Paul - 12 String Guitar, Keyboards, Lead Vocals, Harmonica
*David Carr - Lead Guitar, Acoustic Guitar
*Sandy Garrett - Bass, Vocals
*Randy Haspel - Guitar, Vocals
*Bob Tuccillo - Drums, Percussion
Additional Musicians
*Lamonte "Skip" Ousley - Congas, Percussion
*Charlie McCoy - Harmonica
*John "Hoffy" Hoffmann - Banjo
*Sonny Pitman - Bass
*Weldon Myrick - Steel Guitar
*Don Tweedy - Moog Synthesizer, String Arrangements


Tracks
1. Uncle Bob White - 5:08
2. Circle Sky Moon Mix (Randy Haspel, Tom McNamee) - 4:14
3. Thank You, Maggie - 3:47
4. If You Don't Look Back (Randy Haspel) - 3:13
5. Our Passage Home - 3:37
6. He Ain't Got No Color, Boys (Bob Tuccillo, Dana Paul, David Carr, Sandy Garrett) - 4:06
7. Song Of The Sea - 2:54
8. The Same Thing Applies To Me That Applies To You - 3:51
9. One Last Farewell - 2:39
10.Marie - 2:32
All songs by Dana Paul except where stated.

johnkatsmc5, welcome music..