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8 Apr 2017

Tymepiece “Sweet Release” 1971 Australia Psych Rock








Tymepiece “Sweet Release” 1971  Australia Psych Rock

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The story of Tymepiece encompasses a musical transition that commenced with mid-60’s garage punk and ended seven years later in the realms of full blown progressive rock. Tymepiece’s collectable 1971 album ‘Sweet Release’ is a prime example of where psychedelic pop, folk and country elements combined with a progressive edge to create a unique blend. The album is a fine example of early seventies 'head’ music. Tymepiece originated in the Blue Mountains area around Lithgow (NSW), and comprised an incredibly accomplished bunch of musicians. 

They began life in 1965 as The Black Diamonds, one of the most ferocious garage/punk outfits Australia ever produced. Witness the bands 'I Want, Need, Love You’ on the Ugly Things 60’s punk compilation. The Black Diamonds line-up featured Glenn Bland (vocals, harmonica), Allan 'Olly’ Oloman (guitar, vocals), Brian 'Felix’ Wilkinson (organ, piano), Alan Keogh (bass) and Colin McAuley (Drums). They issued two singles on Festival during 1967 and were equally adept at producing both jubilant pop and tough punk on either side of the one disc. In 1968 Darcy Rosser replaced Keogh on bass, the band changed its name to Tymepiece and made the permanent move to Sydney. 

At that point producer Pat Aulton approached the musicians to record under the name of Love Machine. Their version of 'The Lion Sleeps Tonight’ was a hit, but the band members soon tired of playing under two different names doing entirely divergent sets. Tymepiece moved on, issuing two flower-pop singles. The third Festival single was a taster for the forthcoming album. Issued on Festival’s progressive subsidiary label Infinity, 'Sweet Release’ (February 1971) was an ambitious album of contrasting moods and styles, ranging from hard-psych 'Why?’, 'Nuts’ , folk 'Reflections’, 'Home Song’ , wild R'n'B 'I Love, You Love’ and country flavoured 'Sweet Release’ , 'Take Me Back’ to the heavy progressive-blues sound of 'Shake Off’. 

As the albums centrepiece, 'Shake Off’ is an incredible eight minutes of rumbling bass, pounding drums, wildly demented fuzzed-out blues riffing, wailing harp and heavy, pulsating organ soloing. It’s all quite left field, but impeccably played nonetheless. After such an astonishing debut album Tymepiece should have progressed to the next level, but inexplicably broke up before the year was out. All that remains are a few choice tracks, an albums worth of listening pleasure and the memory of a great band………….
Tymepiece’s sole full-length platter is a competent but kinda dullsville slab of early-'70s album-oriented rock, mixing hard rock, progressive rock, and singer/songwriter-type material. There’s a slightly macho soul-rock feel to some of the songs, like “I Love, You Love,” as well as organ-guitar interplay influenced by some of the leading British bands of the time. Tracks like the title cut and “Won’t You Try” are more in the style of the folk-rock singer/songwriters of the era. Neither the mellow nor harder-edged faces of the group offer compelling songs, however, even though they might have stood out more in their native Australia by virtue of having to compete in a far less crowded field of likeminded homegrown bands than counterparts in the U.S. and U.K. did. The CD reissue on Vicious Sloth Collectables adds both sides of their two 1968 singles, as well as the 1971 B-side “Down and Out.” The 1968 tracks are, unsurprisingly, a little more pop-psychedelic in their orientation (including a cover of the Small Faces’ “Become Like You”), but again bereft of memorable compositions…..by Richie Unterberger…………..

Tymepiece grew out of legendary Aussie 60s band, The Black Diamonds, 
a raucous garage / punk combo. 

Tymepiece’s ultra-rare debut album, Sweet Release (February 1971), is “a diverse range of moods and styles, from psychedelic pop ‘Why?’, folk ‘Reflections’ and country ‘Sweet Release’ to R&B ‘I Love, You Love’ and the pulsating, eight-minute heavy progressive blues ‘Shake Off’.”(Ian McFarlane). 'Shake Off’ is an incredible eight minutes of rumbling bass, pounding drums, wildly demented fuzzed-out blues riffing, wailing harp and heavy, pulsating organ soloing. (Vicious Sloth). ‘Why?’, the opening track, along with ‘Nuts’, the album’s best cut, represents the hard psychedelic strand on this ambitious, wide-ranging album (Borderline Books) 

The album is a fine example of early seventies 'head’ music. After such an astonishing debut album Tymepiece should have progressed to the next level, but inexplicably broke up before the year was out. All that remains are a few choice tracks, an albums worth of listening pleasure and the memory of a great band. (Vicious Sloth)………………..

A Sydney-based band, although they originated from the Blue Mountain Region of New South Wales, who were once known as The Black Diamonds, a raucous garage/punk combo. 'The Ugly Things’ compilation includes that incarnation’s “I Want, Need, Love You”. 

They were a frequent attraction at the Hawaiian Eye and the Coli Drum Disco, which they shared with The Affair as a house band. 

Musically very versatile, they could handle material ranging from vibrant pop, raucous punk to progressive rock. They also performed under the name The Love Machine in 1968 to support a Pat Aulton-created single. 

“Why?”, the opening track on their album, can also be heard on “Group Therapy”. Along with “Nuts”, the album’s best cut, it represented the hard psychedelic strand on their ambitious, wide-ranging album, which doesn’t really gel. Other styles represented include country (“Sweet Release”, “Joseph Straite”, “Home Song” and “Take Me Back”), folk (“Reflections”), R&B (“I Love, You Love”), country-pop (“Won’t You Try”) and a rambling keyboard/guitar progressive style eight-minute attempted opus called “Shake Off”, which ranks as one of the album’s best tracks but falls short of being stunning. “Won’t You Try” was also culled for 45 release. “The Bird In The Tree” has also resurfaced on “So You Want To Be A Rock 'n’ Roll Star” (3-CD). 

Taken from “Dreams, Fantasies and Nightmares” by Vernon Joynson, an extensive guide to Canadian / Australian / New Zealand and Latin American psych and garage music 1963 - 1976…………..

The Black Diamonds hailed from Lithgow (NSW, Australia), evolving out of rockabilly band Johnny Kett’s Black Diamonds in 1965. 

blackdiamonds2Managed by local radio DJ Bob Jolly they played widely around the state, eventually relocating to Sydney in 1967. 

They signed a recording deal with Festival and released their debut single, See The Way, in December 1966. The B-side was a frenetic song called I Want, Need, Love You. 

Their second single, Outside Lookin’ In, was released in 1967. The record made the Top 30 in Sydney. 

Darcy Rosser replaced Allan Keogh on bass in 1968 and the band changed its name to Tymepiece. 

They also worked under the name The Love Machine for a one-off version of The Tokens’ The Lion Sleeps Tonight which they recorded to promote the opening of Bullen’s African Lion Safari at Warragamba in Sydney. 

As Tymepiece the band issued three Singles on the Festival label - Bird in the Tree (August 1968), Become Like You (November 1969) and Won’t You Try?(October 1970). 

Their debut album, Sweet Release finally appeared in February 1971. The band called it a day shortly thereafter………………..

Tymepiece 
*Glenn Bland (aka Chris Kristopher) - Vocals, Harmonica 
*Colin McAuley - Drums 
*Alan “Olly” Oloman - Vocals, Guitar 
*Darcy Rosser – Bass 
*Felix Wilkinson (aka Brian Williamson) - Keyboards, Accordion

Tracklist 
1 Why?
2 I Love, You Love
3 Sweet Release
4 Nuts
5 Won’t You Try
6 Reflections
7 Shake Off
8 Take Me Back
9 Joseph Straite
10 Home Song

Album: 
Sweet Release (Infinity SINL 934113) 1971 

45s: 
I Gotta Know What You’re Like/Bird In The Tree (Festival FK 2457) 1968 
Become Like You/Give A Little More (Festival FK 3369) 1968 
Won’t You Try/Down And Out (Infinity FK-3702) 1971 

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