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28 May 2017

Moto Perpétuo “Moto Perpétuo” 1974 Brazil Crossover Prog







Moto Perpétuo “Moto Perpétuo” 1974 Brazil Crossover Prog
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Moto Perpétuo " Moto Perpétuo" 1974 Brazil Crossover  Prog

Brazilian band of the 70s, the Moto Perpetuo includes some controversy about the discography of the group: only one LP (the 1974) is known to the public, but some (Dolabella as in his "ABZ of Brazilian Rock LPs suggest two more: one in 1969 and another in 1971 by Continental.

The group, after 1974, seems to have gone too far. Despite a visit to the Earl of "Our Daily Sound" and the beginning of the solo career of Arantes in 1976 with an eponymous EP for Som Livre, a core of Perpetual Motion would remain cohesive, launching in 1981 a little known album that many call "the second disc of the Moto Perpetuo". Signed LP as Lucci - Marsol - Tatini - Burani, ie, three former members and a new, Marsol, we "are Quixote," an album that sits between the MPB and the progressive (the excellent first track, is pure Moto Perpetuo)...................

I believe that Guillermo Arantes would give a good case study for psychology - as well as so many other Brazilian and foreign musicians -, for having voluntarily gone from being a great musician, lyricist and composer of the national scene to a bestial contributor to the production of garbage That sustains human misery. Although, in truth, very few musicians of the decade of 1970 maintained the level of quality of old.
I confess that I am aware that I am being strict about the issue, because I know that there are many factors that lead the artist to sell, such as historical, market, economic and political and cultural trends. I fully understand that the artist ends up being pressured to choose to keep up with the state of affairs or else to maintain his artistic passions and run the risk of being forgotten - as happened to so many artists throughout history.
What's done is done! But could not it be any different? Practically from the late 1960s to the late 1970s, in the vast majority of cases, it was the artists who defined cultural movements. When they presented their ideas, the most intellectualized part of society approved and applauded. The "great mass" accepted willingly, for for this - the least favored portion intellectually - it did not matter whether it was quality music or not, as long as it played in soap operas and radio stations; They just wanted the songs to make them rock the skeleton or to touch their hearts, and when they were too complex, they discarded. In short, the market absorbed what the artists offered, and distributed it to everyone. There was music for all tastes, and, for the most part, with a minimum of quality and commitment to art.
Unfortunately, in the current musical scene - in which there is an intense involution of this art -, it is easy to observe that the music of today is no longer made for all, as in the past. Today there are disadvantaged and benefited. The market, certainly, is the most benefited. The great mass is also benefited, because what is not lacking is the production of disposable sonic rubbish. Otherwise, it is also impaired, but in the medium to long term because there is a change of values ​​that is partly caused by so much bad, or by the lack of quality content. Finally, the most disadvantaged are undoubtedly the lovers of quality music. To paraphrase myself, I say that this part of society is doomed to dig into the debris of the past to achieve something consistent, since there is almost nothing being produced for it.
The great truth of all this is that everyone will be harmed by this abandonment of the commitment to quality, with this break with the model of the golden decades of music. I believe that art is one of the essential factors for building the social essence of man. It is distressing to think about what will become of the young in the future, with a present saturated with miasmas from the putrefaction of musical art.
Going back to the past, before I talk about Moto Perpétuo, I will comment on the track Tomorrow, from the 1977 album Ronda Noturna, which was the second solo career of Guilherme Arantes. I wonder what impact this song caused when it was released. I confess that I imagine that it would be impractical to launch today, since it is 7: 39m and is full of progressive ingredients, lyricism, poetry. A song made for all tastes (from that time). At 4:03, everything ends and a vocal arrangement begins, which follows without instruments, interspersing only with silence, and goes on for almost a minute, until a piano appears, and the voices merge in an inspired chorus, simultaneously with the outbreak of Fantastic progressive instrumental, with string orchestra and an amazing guitar, all in an intense progression, until the end. Music of the highest quality and one of the great records of progressive. However, to this day, when you play on the radio, it is not in full. Even in the author's collection, it is cut. (The track is on the player below for online audition)
As for Perpetual Moto, they released two albums: the homonym in 1974 and São Quixote in 1981. The second album only had the participation of Guilherme Arantes playing keyboards in some tracks, since he left the band in 1975, to begin his Successful solo career.
It's an album with high quality lyrics and compositions. With impeccable instruments, the musicians give body and spirit to the songs, with precision and charisma, following a progressive line well in the style of the time. Bass and drums are up to the big bands of that period.
Most of the songs are relatively short, which leaves something to be desired, as a result of which no room is left for the relevant solos of keyboards, guitars and cello. Which is a bit disappointing, because it gives a sense of subtraction, since the compositions cry out for supposedly beautiful soils. However, although rare......................

 Moto Perpetuo is a little known prog band from Brazil, which had a very brief career. Formed by future pop star Guilherme Arantes (keyboards, vocals) and Claudio Lucci (acoustic guitars, cello and electric guitar), the duo recruited Arantes old friend Diogenes Burani (drums) and two young musicians, Egidio Conde (electric guitar) and Gerson Tatini (bass). They were mananged by Moraci Do Val, then nationally famous for making the trio Secos & Molhados a huge success in Brazil and even some other countries in south america. They got a recording deal through Do Val connections and released one self titled LP in 1974, a very quick deal for such young and unproven act. After some real hard rehearsals they recorded what would be their sole album.
Problems started by the recording itself: the band was only allowed to use an already obsolete 8 track studio and few hours to do their work. Although critics praised the songs and the musician´s skill, they also bashed the poor production and mixing. To make matters worse the LP had some distribution issues, making it hard to find even then. Needless to say, the band folded not long after that, unable to find places to play. Arantes decided to go solo and would eventually make it big as a pop singer/songwriter in the beginning of the 80´s. For a time he was one of the hottest songwriters in Brazil. Egídio Conde went on to join another seminal brazilian prog band, O Som Nosso De Cada Dia. The others reunited with singer Monica Marsola and issued an album - São Quixote - in 1981 (with Arantes providing keyboards on some of the tracks as a guest). This second album is so rare that few people is even aware Moto Perpétuo did release a (very different) follow up.

Recently their debut was re-released in a remastered version through the effords of Charles Gavin (Titãs ex drummer) who is doing a great job in rescuing from obscurity several important but forgotten musical jewels. I got this CD a few days ago and I as quite impressed: their music is a cross between traditional prog music of the time (in the arrangements) and brazilian popular music, more specifically the music of my state, Minas Gerais: there are echoes of the works of the famous Clube Da Esquina sound, where young musicians like Beto Guedes and Lô Borges were mixing folk, classical, jazz and Beatles stuff to produce a very unique work. The tracks are more in the ´song´ format, meaning that if you´re looking for long solos or extended instrumental parts you´ll be frustrated. But if you like concise, melodic and very well craft tracks, performed by skilled musicians, then chances are you´re gonna like it a lot.

The remixing did improve the overall sound, although it is also clear that the production was not the best even for the time as I explained above. The songs are good and quite interesting: Arantes was already showing a knack for great hooks, even if the lyrics are way too pretentious (he would go on to write better ones) and the instrumental parts could have at least a little more room to expand. The soaring vocal harmonies are another plus, as it is Lucci´s fine acoustic guitar playing. The record´s highlight is the closing number (and the longest track in the album),.Turba, where the prog influences are quite evident and maybe showed the direction their second album should have taken if they stayed together longer.

All in all I found this record to be good, but far from essential. It was quite promising and the fact that so many fine musicians could not get the chance to grow and fulfill the initial promise is a sad story. However, I really liked this CD and I recommend it for fans of bands heavily influenced by brazilian country music like 14 Bis and O Terço. ............by Tarcisio Moura ...............

"Brazilian band of the 70s, the Moto Perpetuo includes in its lineup former Bando Burani and future pop star Guilherme Arantes. There is some controversy about the discography of the group: only one LP (the 1974) is known to the public, but some (Dolabella as in his "ABZ of Brazilian Rock LPs suggest two more: one in 1969 and another in 1971 by Continental.

The group, after 1974, seems to have gone too far. Despite a visit to the Earl of "Our Daily Sound" and the beginning of the solo career of Arantes in 1976 with an eponymous EP for Som Livre, a core of Perpetual Motion would remain cohesive, launching in 1981 a little known album that many call "the second disc of the Moto Perpetuo". Signed LP as Lucci - Marsol - Tatini - Burani, ie, three former members and a new, Marsol, we "are Quixote," an album that sits between the MPB and the progressive (the excellent first track, is pure Moto Perpetuo) .......................

Musicians:
- Guilherme Arantes / keyboards, lead vocals
- Claudio Lucci / acoustic guitars, electric guitar, cello, vocals
- Egydio Conde / electric guitar, vocals
- Diogenes Burani / percussion, vocals
- Gerson Tatini / bass, vocals

Tracks:
1. Mal o Sol (2:54)
2. Conto Contigo (2:55)
3. Verde Vertente (3:18)
4. Matinal (4:35)
5. Tr?s e Eu (5:18)
6. N?o Reclamo da Chuva (2:32)
7. Duas (2:18)
8. Sobe (3:19)
9. Seguir Viagem (1:40)
10. Os Jardins (3:01)
11. Turba (6:02)

johnkatsmc5, welcome music..