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19 May 2017

Stonefield Tramp "Dreaming Again…“ 1974 UK Private Prog Folk Rock,Acid Folk













Stonefield Tramp  "Dreaming Again…“ 1974 UK mega rare Private  Prog Folk Rock,Acid Folk
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Stonefield Tramp official web site…….
The band formed in the early 1970s, when two young men served their time in the British Armed Forces, decided to take up the artistic and musical life style. Rob van Spyk (music) and Terry Friend (words) first met at the age of 16 in 1964 and Do not part to this day. 
His first album, "Going Nowhere", was recorded in 1971. (Pirated copies of which do not yet have a remaster and are valued highly among collectors around the world) 
After recording the acoustic album "Follow The Sun" on the label "Acorn Records" (1974) (which went very well), the duo returned to the studio three months later with two additional musicians Dave Lloyd (Guitar) and Chris Suttoris (Bass) for recording The disk laid out here. 
The album is highly regarded among British folk fans. According to the sound, Bob Dylan's influence is strongly influenced by the accent on acid folk...........

The U.K. folk scene was exploding with ambitious young singer/songwriters and acoustic pickers in the early ‘70s, when Rob Van Spyk first banded together with some similarly inclined pals to form a group that mixed rootsy sounds with often-political lyricism, the latter mostly supplied by Terry Friend. They self-released their first LP in 1974, under the name R.J. Van Spyk & Friends, but after expanding the lineup and their sound, they changed their name to Stonefield Tramp and unveiled another D.I.Y. album, Dreaming Again, that same year. The album shifts back and forth between two modes. One has a folk-rocky, all-for-one collective feel, with the group's acoustic -- and occasionally electric -- axes riffing at length over the same vamp, while rough-hewn vocals deliver intense, socially conscious lyrics mostly written by Friend. The other is a more balladic folk singer approach, typified by "Social State Blues," a straightforward political folk song of the sort that had been filling coffeehouses all over England a few years earlier, but were likely in shorter supply by 1974. The penultimate track on Dreaming Again is the mostly instrumental "Theme from Follow the Sun," the sort of tune tailor-made for riding off into the sunset, with its keening, cowboy harmonica and "happy trails" feel. Things close out with the low-key acoustic picking of "Doing Things Naturally," a kind of anti-anthem for the post-hippie era. In the end, there's an endearingly amateurish quality to the whole affair that imbues Dreaming Again with an amiable underground vibe even when the subject matter turns gloomy.......by James Allen ...........

The U.K. folk scene was exploding with ambitious young singer/songwriters and acoustic pickers in the early ‘70s, when Rob Van Spyk first banded together with some similarly inclined pals to form a group that mixed rootsy sounds with often-political lyricism, the latter mostly supplied by Terry Friend. They self-released their first LP in 1974, under the name R.J. Van Spyk & Friends, but after expanding the lineup and their sound, they changed their name to Stonefield Tramp and unveiled another D.I.Y. album, Dreaming Again, that same year. 

The album shifts back and forth between two modes. One has a folk-rocky, all-for-one collective feel, with the group's acoustic -- and occasionally electric -- axes riffing at length over the same vamp, while rough-hewn vocals deliver intense, socially conscious lyrics mostly written by Friend. The other is a more balladic folk singer approach, typified by "Social State Blues," a straightforward political folk song of the sort that had been filling coffeehouses all over England a few years earlier, but were likely in shorter supply by 1974. 
by James Allen..............

The friendship . . . . 

In 1963 I joined the British Army as a boy entrant, and spent the first three years of my military journey, in the wilds on North Wales. Tonfanau (pronounced ton-van-eye), is a small town in Gwynedd, Wales, located by the sea just about 20 miles north of Aberystwyth, where the All Arms Junior Leaders Regiment was stationed. It was here that I was to form some of the most enduring friendships that have lasted my lifetime to date. One of the most important relationships being with a fellow Junior Leader by the name of Terry Friend who joined our platoon in the spring of 1964. 

After a grueling couple of years of combined military and academic training we graduated from ‘boy service’ in July 1965. Then from the rugged rural existence of Camp Tonfanau we splintered into different Regiments and contact became very infrequent for many years as we made our way through our respective military careers. In 1969 I decided to leave the army and pursue my future as a civilian. 

Sometime in 1969/1970 I received a letter from Terry asking if I still played guitar and, if so, would I be interested in taking a look at some of his poetry and working out some songs. Now our boyhood friendship took on a much more serious tone and the ‘van Spyk/Friend’ song writing partnership was formed.

Pre Stonefield Tramp. . . . 

Terry moved to Letchworth, Hertfordshire in the United Kingdom, in the late Autumn of 1970 so that we could work on our songs together and produce enough material to record a demo record. The idea being that the demo could be used to promote our songs to the music publishing houses and record companies. ‘Going Nowhere‘ was the working title of the project and would consist of ten songs and one poem. The ensemble to perform for the recording would be composed of ‘Ivo Jan van der Werff’, my twelve year old cousin, Marion, my girl friend and Terry, who played a very minor role in the studio, with the bulk of the work, both vocal and instrumental, being done by myself. . We booked the ‘True Sound‘ recording studio in Henlow, Bedfordshire for a 6 hour session on the Easter Saturday of 1971. One song,’When I Was Young’, was added to the track listing as we found we needed a time filler to take full advantage of the total recording time that could be engraved on the acetate disc, and was constructed, more or less, on the run, in the studio! All the songs were recorded in straight takes with none of the embellishments of a modern studio and the four (4) acetates were cut at the end of the session...............

“More than five years have passed since I reviewed “Follow the Sun” and “Come the Day” the lesser known of the Terry Friend commercial releases (who is more famous for his now cult underground folk band Stonefield Tramp). It is therefore high time to have a few words about his beginnings as a musician and his first musical project, which was just reissued in late December 2016 on the Tramp label (or released for the very first time if you consider that the number of original copies of “Going Nowhere”, also known as “The Acetate” can be counted on one hand). The story of this recording is interesting because Terry not only never had the intention to release an album at the time but thought that he was writing poems, not song lyrics. He realized he was wrong, started learning music, called his friend Rob Van Spyk (a folk singer and songwriter) and it’s how a great but unexpected song writing partnership started. All the songs are self-penned and mostly a combination of voices with guitar only with the exception of “Doing Thing Naturally”, “A Country Divided”, “Lady of the East” (three beautiful tunes with flute, among the best pieces on the album) and the opening title (a lovely spoken word song with a typical British feel). The recording quality of the album is obviously raw, there are hit and miss, the guitar playing is sometimes plain (particularly in the more energetic songs) and the duo was still searching for its identity, but there is a lot to like in this recording. The moodier songs are excellent, the quality of the lyrics is very good, and most importantly, Going Nowhere offers a fascinating lost-in-time atmosphere. 

If you only own like three UK private pressing records, I don’t think that “The Acetate” needs to be your fourth, but if you’re a fan of the genre – in other words, if you’re the kind of person who like reading the reviews of the more obscure folk albums on Galactic Ramble and searching all the time for new gems on labels like Deroy, John Hassell Recordings or Acorn – this will be right up your alley and like many of the albums put out by these prestigious labels “Going Nowhere” will perhaps someday become a collector’s item knowing the fact that this reissue is a limited edition of 250 copies. “The Acetate” comes in an elegant cover accompanied by a CD version of the album.”.........Alexandre from France..............

“The most greatest reissue album of all times !!! 
Only one time played, I was fascinated by this record. It sound So simple and pure but deep hollow sound which really brought happiness and charm to my ears. Also as being one of the listener, I was really impressed and satisfied.”......Moon from South Korea.............

“For many people and especially artists, even more so musicians, recalling old, long gone, youth amateur creations from a time when things were more innocent and much less anxious than today, without the older age problems, brings welcome memories. In some cases also, due to the current revival interest for old ‘long lost’ recordings to be reissued, pushes them to present that old material for which they are proud today, but did not even realize it back then. One of those cases (much more information and the history beside it can be dug from the ‘www.stonefield-tramp.com‘ page) is the one by Rob van Spyk and Terry Friend. Their never really issued before, apart for a few demos, nice acoustic folk album from the early 70s known as ‘The Acetate’ just got it’s private limited release. It is a product from that creative era, when success and promotion was not sought or easy to achieve. A very welcome one pressed on vinyl accompanied by the CD, will surely please all those collectors and fans of this type of music, enabling them to fully enjoy at last this gem. It certainly contains interesting arrangements and flows very nicely all together. Lyrics with a meaning and criticism and the whole dreamy atmosphere and melodies push for repeated listening. Similarities with other folk albums of the era exist but holds it’s place securely and the lo-fi recording helps. I recommend it for sure to all those who treasure the 70’s for the fine music that showed up back then in big contrast to what mostly happens today. “............Dimitris from Greece:.............

The Stonefield Tramp 
*Terry Friend - Lyrics 
*Brian Balster - Guitar, Vocals 
*Dave Lloyd - Guitar 
*Chris Sutoris - Bass 
*Rob Van Spyk - Guitar, Vocals

Tracks 
1. Dreaming Again (Rob Van Spyk) - 4:17 
2. Bitter World - 10:09 
3. Oh Mothers Tell Your Children - 5:33 
4. Jaded Jane (Rob Van Spyk) - 5:27 
5. Social State Blues - 3:32 
6. Factory - 4:20 
7. Theme From Follow The Sun (Rob Van Spyk) - 2:20 
8. Doing Things Naturally - 2:21

Discography

1971 – Going Nowhere – Van Spyk & Friend – Demo acetate Only
1974 – Follow the Sun – R. J.Van Spyk and Friends – Acorn CF 241
1974 – Dreaming Again – Stonefield Tramp – Tramp CF 247
1977 – Come the Day – Terry Friend & Friends – Tramp THF001
1978 – Chloroform – The Bleach Boys – Tramp THF002
2016 – The Acetate – Van Spyk & Friend – Tramp 004
2016 – The Acetate – Van Spyk & Friend – Tramp CD004
2017 – Anno Domini – Terry Friend – Tramp THF005 (Reserved)
2009 – Full Circle – Stonefield Tramp – Tramp 006 (Reserved)

johnkatsmc5, welcome music..