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10 May 2017

Titus Oates “Jungle Lady” 1974 Texas private Psych rock



















Titus Oates “Jungle Lady” 1974  very rare & excellent Texas private psych rock
full
watch Titus Oates web site
watch Lou Tielli web site
In the early 1970’s, we had the songs written and wanted to record the album but our funds were limited. Sumet- Burnet Studios in Dallas Texas had a deal they called the “Midnight Special”. For a reduced fee, you could come in the studio from 12 midnight until 8 a.m. and record. Bobby Dennis was the engineer that did these sessions and he was a musician himself. We booked the studio for three straight sessions as that was all we could afford and then we began rehearsing in advance so that we would not waste any time in the studio.

We did all of the rhythm tracks on the first night, all the lead tracks the second and all the vocals the third night. It was a great plan with one exception. Our third session, after being up two nights in a row, made the vocals pretty rough. Looking back, waiting on the vocals would have been a better idea. We were anxious to finish the recording though so we forged ahead.

The album was mixed and again remixed in two additional afternoon sessions.

We then had the album mastered twice: once in Dallas at A&R records and then again in Nashville with a little hotter mix.

We only spent a total of 24 hours recording the album and we were up against groups that would spend weeks, even months in a recording studio.............

Titus Oates was a Dallas, TX, progressive hard rock five-piece that was never well known. The group's lone 1974 LP was only issued locally on the Lips label, and until this reissue from Radioactive the only way to hear the thing was to lay down hard cash for a shoddy bootleg -- an important point because, while it may not have the bombast of a major-label recording, Jungle Lady does not suffer from the murky sonics that dog most self-released records of this sort. Because it was a local pressing, it has been nearly impossible to locate, too; as a result, Titus Oates has been at the top of many collectors' want lists for years, its legend growing every time someone added it to a personal catalog of Holy Grails. Does it live up to the hype? Sort of. Jungle Lady is a competent curiosity that balances tough Texas-style hard rock playing -- it's not ZZ Top, but it's close -- with progressive rock keyboards and jazzy guitar licks. Those aren't things that often intersect, and so the legend is deserved. The execution leaves something to be desired, though, and despite some very nice guitar playing, Titus Oates sits flatly at the journeyman rock level, which is probably why Jungle Lady didn't make it out of Dallas the first time around. That doesn't really take away from enjoying Jungle Lady, though, and with its heady, largely unexplored mix of rock grit and prog flourish, it's sure to find an appreciative audience................

Titus Oates was a Dallas, TX, progressive hard rock five-piece that was never well known. The group's lone 1974 LP was only issued locally on the Lips label, and until this reissue from Radioactive the only way to hear the thing was to lay down hard cash for a shoddy bootleg -- an important point because, while it may not have the bombast of a major-label recording, Jungle Lady does not suffer from the murky sonics that dog most self-released records of this sort. Because it was a local pressing, it has been nearly impossible to locate, too; as a result, Titus Oates has been at the top of many collectors' want lists for years, its legend growing every time someone added it to a personal catalog of Holy Grails.
Does it live up to the hype? Sort of. Jungle Lady is a competent curiosity that balances tough Texas-style hard rock playing -- it's not ZZ Top, but it's close -- with progressive rock keyboards and jazzy guitar licks. Those aren't things that often intersect, and so the legend is deserved. "Jungle Lady" is a heady, largely unexplored mix of rock grit and prog flourish, it's sure to find an appreciative audience....by.... Wade Kergan...........

"Jungle Lady" (1974) was the only album released on small private label ("Lips" - catalogue Nr Lips 003 R2) by Dallas-based act, which played top-league hard-rock blended with psychedelia and progressive, in many aspects coming close to super-league British peers (Act One, As Your Mind Flies By). The music of the band is talented, versatile, never boring - not unlike self-repetitive and monotonous ZZ Top* (with which it is often compared due to unknown reasons - geographically, perhaps; further to this criteria one has the right to compare, let's say, Beatles to Sex Pistols - both came from England). High-register vocal harmonies are quite amazing, the duetto on "Time Is Only To Fear" is more impressive than Jefferson Airplane's masterpieces.
The band was called "Titus Oates" - after an English perjurer (1649-1705), who fabricated Catholic plot to kill the King (by the way, he was also accused of buggery=sodomy - I mean Titus Oates, not the King). The name was chosen because of the same reasons (perhaps)as English soupergroup picked up the name of XVII century agriculturist (Jethro Tull, 1674-1741).
The musicians were:
Lou Tielli - guitars, Christ Eigenmann - percussion, Rick Jackson - bass guitar, arp string ensemble, lead vocals; Bill Beaudet - keyboards, Steve Todd - guitars. Angelic clear voice on "Time Is Only To Fear" belongs to Pam Jackson.
Being in Dallas, and signed to minor label, "Titus Oates" had no chances to make it big........Golovanov Alexey,

Originally privately released on the Lips label in 1974 (USA).
The reissue CD Radioactive is worth obtaining,originals of this album are extremely rare and still change hands for a lot of bucks.
(Worth noting is the existence of a reissue on vinyl of 1988 Hab label HBL 11006)

Titus Oates Dallas-based rock combo very good,American band playing a combination of hard rock guitar (somewhat in the style of Wishbone Ash and UFOs) with elements of progressive rock (saxophone, organ, synthesizer) as well as the folk-rock from the West Coast of the United States. Although their Southern roots do occasionally come to the surface in the form of some excellent Allman Brothers-style dual-guitar interludes and a couple of heavy bass riff-focused power tunes. Rick Jackson wrote all the material on the album on which the keyboards and vocals blend nicely with some melodic guitar work dual-guitar interludes and a couple of heavy bass riff focused power tunes material ranges from ‘60s flower-power pop soul metropolitan, very smooth in the sound of keyboards and wah-wah guitars to hard, roadhouse psychedelia.

Those who fear attacks from diabetes to stay away from the mellotron Bill Beaudet 'Dream on a Train', resounding soft-rock for teenagers in love which sparkle eyes and honeyed melody which is likely to stick in your ears; same stuff in the country 'Time Is Only to Fear' (just more dreamy, complete with female vocals) and 'Friends of Life', proto AOR, after all quite well produced and with a good dose of suspense left. Bill solved the rock-pop (the British mold) for hammond happy ending of 'Jupiter, Mars' and at the end there is also room for a riff actually hardrock in 'Mr. Tips', debased just the keyboard, but definitely not bad. It turns out that one of the best tracks is the atmospheric funk Listen Now! 'Do not Get Your Honey Where You Make Your Money', sound very urban (in the area of ​​Climax Blus Band Stamp Album) illuminated by neon blue and pink and soft guitar liquidity cocktail lounge well alternate arrangements doors. But in reality the riff faux-Celtic-Irish of 'Jungle Lady' leaves a nice taste in your mouth, as well as the heroic bucking low on 'Blanket' piece as effective as in the verse and the chorus in the beautiful duet for guitars opposing that could last more than ten minutes and instead is mortified by a dull fade-out. Then 'The Cage 7/2/74', a self-cover of 'Jungle Lady', which ends to close the circle with the opening track, with a new duel between Bill Beaudet and the couple Tielli-Todd.
Overall, this is a very cool album. ...........by...adamus67..........

Out-Sider present the first vinyl reissue of Jungle Lady (1974) by Titus Oates. This is the first ever legitimate vinyl reissue of this progressive hard-rock private pressing from Texas, 1974. Excellent dual guitars, keyboards, melodic vocals, West Coast touches - think Allman Brothers, early ZZ Top, Wishbone Ash, Homer. Top notch pro-sounding recording and superb musicianship. Jungle Lady saw the light in two different pressings: the original white label Lips vinyl from 1974 is the first pressing, and the red Lips label is a remix done later in Nashville, possibly around 1975. This Out-sider reissue is taken from the remix version, as it was always believed to be "hotter" than the original pressing. One of the classics since the early days or rare psych records lists, championed by influential tastemakers such as Paul Major. "Personal fave with TX/West coast bar band mystique fulla spooky organ, hot guitar licks & warm vocals on the folk-rocky ballads. Has a seedy singles bar pick-up music undercurrent I dig & fantastic gatefold cover art" -- Paul Major. Master tape sound. Includes insert with detailed liner notes and photos........................


Titus Oates
*Rick Jackson - Bass
*Lou Tielli - Guitar
*Steve Todd - Guitar
*Bill Beaudet - Keyboards
*Lou Tielli - Lead Vocals
*Pam Jackson - Lead Vocals
*Rick Jackson - Lead Vocals, Strings Ensemble
*Chris Eigenmann - Percussion

Tracklist
1 Jungle Lady 3:25
2 Dream On A Train 4:00
3 Blanket 3:45
4 Friend Of Life 3:45
5 Jupiter And Mars 3:25
6 Time Is Only To Fear 3:20
7 Mr. Lips 3:25
8 Don't Get Your Honey 4:50
9 The Cage 3:10

johnkatsmc5, welcome music..

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