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14 Jun 2017

JPT Scare Band “Sleeping Sickness” 2001 Texas Heavy Psych,Acid Rock,Hard Rock recorded 1974-1976.










JPT Scare Band “Sleeping Sickness” 2001 Texas Heavy Psych,Acid Rock,Hard Rock  recorded 1974-1976.

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JPT Scare Band - Ramona 
full discography on discogs…
Jeff at the Liberty Memorial in Kansas City, Missouri - 1977.

JPT Scare Band 1973

JPT Scare Band in 1976

JPT Scare Band with Greg Gassman & Friends at the Stone House on Crooked Road near Parkville, Missouri - 1975.



Members of JPT Scare Band & Friends at Cosmic Acres July 4, 1973

Paul & Jeff at Volker Park in Kansas City, Missouri in 1974

Paul & Terry at Volker Park in Kansas City, Missouri in 1974




JPT Scare Band is an American rock band.It took its name from its members first initials and their scary acid rock sound.Although the band did not release their first album until the early 1990s,they had formed in the early 1970s and made numerous recordings on a reel to reel tape deck in a basement.Songs from the album,Sleeping Sickness,went into fairly heavy rotation on FM stations WFMU and WNYU in New York,which played a major role in dredging JPT up from the depths of total obscurity. 
A great re-issue from Monster Records The name JPT is based around the first letter in the members first names drummer Jeff Lintrell,Paul Grigsby bass,vocals and Tony Swope vocals/guitar.The recordings of this album dates back to 1973 when the band was formed compiled from two previous releases on Monster,Acid Acetate Excurison and Rape of Titan/s Sirens.There is also recordings on this album recorded originally from 1974-1976.7 seven tracks is in here classic original vintage heavyrock anthems all of them,similarities with Jimi Hendrix Experience,Freedom,Sir Lord Baltimore,Tempest and Banchee is very obvious,along with Led Zeppelin and Cream.Sleeping Sickness is a powerhouse record and worth every penny. .........................

These recordings from the Kansas City threesome, JPT Scare Band, from 1973-75, have been bootlegged for eons at pricey sums. Finally, Monster Records delivers the prime cut of psychedelic hard rock to you, the people, and hopefully the band members will finally get to see some cash flow out of their work. If the band had a signed record contract back in the early 70s, there is no doubt they would be up there with Jimi Hendrix, Cream, and Black Sabbath for guitar overload damage. Unfortunately, these recordings never really made it out of the inner circles of hard psych heads. Of course, Sleeping Sickness isn t a copy of those bands or their styles, but the main focus here is very long (often 10 minute plus) jams that concentrate on the guitar playing of Terry Swope. --By Andy Perseponko

Perhaps what makes Sleeping Sickness stand out more than anything is that it doesn t sound dated at all. I am sure there were bands all over America at that time, gathering in basements and playing for hours and hours under a variety of conditions. The JPT Scare Band recorded most of this stuff in the basement of their party house in Kansas City. While it does date from the mid- 70s, Sleeping Sickness definitely has a " 60s" feel about it, in terms of the freedom of the players and how well they play together, as opposed to the bass and drums sitting back while the guitar player gets all the glory. Of course, the guitar is the star of this show, but it wouldn t be anywhere near as entertaining if the other musicians didn t keep their collective feet on the ground, at least a little bit. --Andy Perseponko

This record is a goodie... It s starts off and grabs you right away with its true 70 s blend of acid and blues. Pure volume and sweat. This record reminds me of a cross between Band of Gypsies and Led Zeppelin with a hint of King Crimson and John McLaughlin ... Very very heavy- very guitar rock. Lots of leads and the guy can play, let me tell you. He fully blazes and is worth checking out alone for that matter. It has a warm natural watery overdriven tone that just make you know that JPT means business. This trio is a tight unit. The vocals done on this Re-mastered LP are over the top soul blues like mostly... Reminding me of Buddy Miles or slightly like Stevie Ray Vaughn... It was recorded somewhere in the mid 70 s I believe, mostly recorded live straight into a tape machine with tons of separation somehow. A real decent stereo spatial mix for sure. True and representative of their live jam sound. Lots of jazz influenced changes, soul grooves... wah-wah and space blues, and I cannot stress that enough I guess. .........

This record is a goodie... It's starts off and grabs you right away with its true 70's blend of acid and blues. Pure volume and sweat. This record reminds me of a cross between Band of Gypsies and Led Zeppelin with a hint of King Crimson and John McLaughlin ... Very very heavy- very guitar rock. Lots of leads and the guy can play, let me tell you. He fully blazes and is worth checking out alone for that matter. It has a warm natural watery overdriven tone that just make you know that JPT means business.
This trio is a tight unit. The vocals done on this Re-mastered LP are over the top soul blues like mostly... Reminding me of Buddy Miles or slightly like Stevie Ray Vaughn... It was recorded somewhere in the mid 70's I believe, mostly recorded live straight into a tape machine with tons of separation somehow. A real decent stereo spatial mix for sure. True and representative of their live jam sound. Lots of jazz influenced changes, soul grooves... wah-wah and space blues, and I cannot stress that enough I guess.
The guitar player simply makes this collection of jams just over the top and killer for me. Sometimes at speeds only Wino knows about- the guitar player (I don't have the booklet and don't know his name...) from JPT is almost firing heavy riffs with lots of weird jazz/blues riffs. Very Page at times...very soulful. The long jams sections break into part that are covered by only three instruments and the vocals usually drop for a while during these parts... Hints of Cream and Sabbath seem to jump out at you from time to time during these cool frequent type parts throughout this CD.
If you like the early 70's hard rock combos... Budgie, Zep... Experience...Roky Erickson...that same vibe. Very similar to all things that I myself treasure. The sure joys of playing loud amps all the way up-feeling through your bones, and kicking out some serious blues deep down psychedelic roots...late 60's early 70's...that is what it is all about to me. There will never be those times again, that's for sure..................

A posthumous document of a virtually unknown band from Kansas City, Missouri, culled from recordings made between 1973 and 1976. (J)eff Litrell, (P)aul Grigsby, and (T)erry Swope were a power trio to the fullest extent of the term (a la Blue Cheer, Cream, Jimi Hendrix Experience). This CD (73 minutes) contains the original uncut versions of songs that first appeared on the limited edition vinyl only "Acid Acetate Excursion" and "Rape of Titan's Sirens". The guitar is firmly planted in the spotlight, almost non-stop solos with a few exceptions, including the infrequent use of vocals (Terry Swope serving double duty as GUITAR GOD and singer). Not for the weak, I almost think this should have been packaged with a warning label: THIS ALBUM MAY CAUSE SERIOUS MUSCLE STRAIN DUE TO UNCONTROLLABLE FITS OF AIR GUITAR. USE WITH CAUTION. If history had unfolded differently, or had they hooked up with a proper label at the time, there would definitely be another guitar hero honored in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. [AG].............

The discography of Kansas City trio JPT Scare Band is not a particularly easy one to trace. Albums were recorded during their initial early-’70s run and then left to sit for decades, then there were compilations and other studio works after they got back together that only made it more difficult to put to a convenient timeline. Bottom line, however, is that their output is worth the effort of trying to make sense of it time-wise. Their latest outing, 2009’s Rumdum Daddy (review here), led to a signing with Ripple Music for the subsequent 2010 comp, Acid Blues is the White Man’s Burden (review here), but prior to that, the band had also issued records like Jamm Vapour, Past is Prologue and Sleeping Sickness (discussed here) on their own Kung Bomar imprint, leaving just their first two outings, Acid Acetate Excursion and Rape of the Titan’s Sirens, yet un-reissued.

Ripple is stepping in to rectify the situation, and will oversee the release of both records as a 2LP set in April. Below, the PR wire brings word of the new vinyl and does as admirable a job as I’ve seen of making JPT Scare Band‘s complex history — did I mention the members live in different states? — make sense to the layperson. And by “layperson,” I mean me.

Dig it:

Proto-Metal legends JPT Scare Band to release vinyl set via Ripple Music | Stream album track ‘It’s Too Late’
Banded together during the tumultuous years of the early 70s, JPT Scare Band fused a sound equally heavy in hard rocking blues as it was tripped out in psychedelia, creating a sound so imposing that it perfectly reflected the emotions of the era. Formed by guitarist/vocalist Terry Swope, drummer Jeff Littrell, and bassist Paul Grigsby, JPT Scare Band began recording songs in their Kansas City basement and soon compiled a vault full of reel-to-reel tapes that would make up much of the band’s catalogue.

Though the band formed in 1973, JPT Scare Band’s first album, Acid Acetate Excursion, wasn’t released until 1994, over twenty years after the band’s formation. Along with Acid Acetate Excursion, the band, in conjunction with Monster Records, released two more albums, 1998’s Rape Of Titan’s Sirens and 2000’s Sleeping Sickness. Both releases highlighted the bands heavy psych/proto-metal blues sound through the otherworldly and unheralded guitar work of Terry Swope, and each has become an underground cult classic.

The new millennium has seen JPT Scare Band delve deeper into their archive of recorded material, accumulated through massive jam sessions throughout the 70s, as well as the 90s, and a flood of product was soon released. Through the band’s self-realised label Kung Bomar, seven albums hit the streets including 2002’s brilliant Past Is Prologue, 2007’s stunning release of all new material with Jamm Vapour and most recently, 2009’s Rumdum Daddy.

In the waning months of 2009, JPT Scare Band merged their energies with rock label Ripple Music to release Acid Blues Is The White Man’s Burden, a collection of unreleased tracks, extended jams, and outstanding cover tunes that helped bridge the gaps in the JPT chronology and turn on a whole new generation on to their classic version of acid rock.

Despite being scattered across the US, JPT Scare Band has never stopped working and creating relevant music. JPT have the uncanny ability, an almost shared consciousness, to pick up right where they left off after being apart for fifteen years and hammer out a set of hard edged guitar driven rock that would have made Cream sound soft. JPT Scare Band will appeal to fans of Jimi Hendrix, Cream, and Black Sabbath.

This April, Ripple Music will release a very special LP set consisting of their first two, seminal releases – Acid Acetate Excursion and Rape Of The Titan’s Sirens – re-presented in full, with new gatefold album art that incorporates the images of the original two albums. Originally recorded in the 1970s, these albums have been out of print since the original Monster Records release in the early 90s and represent the full early history of the band that Classic Rock Magazine once hailed as one of the, “Lost pioneers of Proto-Metal.”

Acid Acetate Excursion and Rape Of The Titan’s Sirens will be released together via Ripple Music on 28th April 2015......................

Welcome to The Lazarus Pit, a biweekly look at should-be classic metal records that don’t get nearly enough love; stuff that’s essential listening that you’ve probably never heard of; stuff that we’re too lazy to track down the band members to do a Hall Of Fame for. This week, we go back before the dawn of recorded time (1980) to cover the JPT Scare Band's prehistoric jams on Sleeping Sickness (Monster). So, here's the thing about Sleeping Sickness: it actually came out in 2000. However, if these songs were actually recorded in this millennium, they wouldn't be nearly so notable. Still awesome, don't get me wrong; just not as notable. This is actually a compilation of tunes recorded between 1973 and 1976. Much like Pentagram, the Kansas City power trio of Jeff Littrell, Paul Grigsby, and Terry Swope (see how they got the name?) never managed to secure a record deal during their initial run. They did, however, record their legacy on to some reel to reel tapes in someone's basement, which were later dug up and issued on several LPs in the 90s. Those versions were edited, though. This CD release contains the full insanity.

These guys weren't really metal, per se. Possibly proto-metal. The band themselves have said that they don't consider themselves metal, but would take any attention that they can get. Besides, who else is going to listen to this stuff in this day and age besides metalheads (and acid casualties)? They drew heavily from Cream and Jimi Hendrix, with some Blue Cheer thrown in, but then they took it to the extreme via endless jams. Heavy, fuzzed-out grooves stretch into eternity, Terry Swope's non-Euclidean guitar work threatening to skid off the rails and into a whole new dimension. Don't expect song structure; these are improvisations, the sound of three friends enjoying each other's company and the interplay of their instruments.
That isn't to say that these aren't distinct tunes, though. "It's Too Late" is probably the closest thing to a single here, with its touches of Blue Oyster Cult and Grand Funk Railroad. "Acid Acetate Excursion" fits its title perfectly, with loads of wah-wah pedal and distortion-soaked spirit journeying. The one where they really take off into the cosmos has to be "I've Been Waiting," which starts off like a low-key Led Zeppelin live cut and briefly pauses for a flute solo before Swope lights a fire under his guitar and it traces through the air like a firework.

The JPT Scare Band predated Earthless and pretty much the rest of the Teepee roster by a few decades. Hell, if that label had been around in the mid-70s, these guys probably would have found a happy home there. Alas, they never had their moment in the sun back when they would have been hailed as the innovators that they were. They've been pretty active this decade, though, putting out a series of releases cataloging other basement recordings in addition to new material. So check out Sleeping Sickness; it's a long, strange trip, but it's an immensely satisfying one..................

Whereas by the 21st century any 12-year-old with a laptop and a MySpace page could make music and have it heard by millions of strangers, in the pre-internet days artists and bands might work and perform diligently for years on end without escaping utter anonymity, never mind even sniffing a record deal. This is the story of (among many other groups) Kansas City's JPT Scare Band, which was formed in 1973 by three friends -- vocalist/guitarist Terry Swope, bassist Paul Grigsby, and drummer Jeff Littrell -- who simply loved to jam for hours on end, inspired by the psychedelic hard rock of Cream, Blue Cheer, and the Jimi Hendrix Experience. Although they would soon realize that their symbiotic musical relationship was something special and eventually recorded the best fruits of their labor to tape, the JPT Scare Band (named after its members' first initials, obviously, plus the scary length of their acid rock jams) never managed to graduate from basement woodshedding to world-wide stardom. Their informal reel to reel recordings were so obscure and sparsely circulated, in fact, that the group would likely have been entirely forgotten were it not for a pair of hard rock anthropologists at Monster Records, who tracked them down in the early '90s and rounded up their '70s highlights for limited release on two vinyl albums, Acid Acetate Excursion and Rape of Titan's Sirens, and later CD via 2000's Sleeping Sickness. These reissues were rave-reviewed and eagerly snapped up by collectors of '70s hard rock, but when the JPT Scare Band members -- still friends and still jamming after all these years, believe it or not -- asked Monster to release some of their present-day recordings, the label balked, and by conveniently going out of business shortly thereafter, motivated the veteran rockers to take matters into their own hands. Launching their own website and indie label, Kung Bomar, the JPT Scare Band promptly issued a new collection, Past Is Prologue, mixing old and more recent material in 2002 -- then followed with brand new albums, Echoes of the Everland (2006) and Jamm Vapour (2007), with the promise of more new and unearthed '70s material still to come. ~ Eduardo Rivadavia....................

Credits
Bass – Paul Grigsby
Drums – Jeff LIttrell
Guitar – Terry Swope (2)
Vocals – Paul Grigsby, Terry Swope (2)

 1. Sleeping Sickness
2. Slow Sick Shuffle
3. King Rat
4. It's Too Late
5. Acid Acetate Excursion
6. I've Been Waiting
7. Time To Cry







johnkatsmc5, welcome music..

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