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2 Jun 2017

Marcos Valle “Vento Sul” 1972 Brazil Psych Samba,MPB,Bossanova, with members of the “O Terço”








Marcos Valle “Vento Sul” 1972 Brazil Psych Samba,MPB,Bossanova, with members of the “O Terço”…recommended..!
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Heavily influenced by American rock, soul and jazz as well as traditional bossa nova, samba and baião, Marcos Valle created a new modern Brazilian sound that was cool and funky. "Vento Sul" has a bright, laidback psychedelic 'surfer beach' sound - glorious stuff! Recommended! ...........


A super-spacy, folk-psychedelic, soundtrack-alicious minor masterpiece, with Valle at his most cosmic and hippiedelic, perhaps at his peak. His brother Paulo Sergio Valle contributes lyrics and a warm, fraternal vibe, while the pioneering Brazilian prog band O Terco provides the backing as Valle experiments with soaring melodies amid vast, open horizons. The emphasis on instrumental music may be seen in part as a way to avoid the scrutiny of Brazil's military censors, but also a reflection of where Valle's head was at the time, in a period said to be dominated by surfing and hanging out at the beach. It's breezy music with surprising heft, and certainly one of the Marcos Valle records you'll want to try out first if you're new to his work.......................

During the hot Brazilian summer of 1971, Marcos and Paulo Sergio Valle, along with their significant others and six additional couples, rented a few modest fisherman shacks in the small village of Búzios to escape from Rio’s more populated beaches. The focus was making music and soul searching, as was the practice for affluent young hippies back then. They stayed for two months. “I wanted to go in a new direction,” says Marcos looking back. “I wanted to try out a rock influence and to risk a little bit more.” Shifting away from the studio musicians used on 1971’s Garra, Vento Sul (translation “South Wind”) was a rewarding collaboration with Brazilian progressive rockers O Terço.

Originally released in 1972, Vento Sul not only channeled the Búzios beach bum vibe, but also manifested a floating dream like psychedelic sound. Any way you spin it, we at Light In The Attic are extremely proud to present Vento Sul as part of our four-album Marcos Valle reissue campaign. Consisting of an ambitious string of early 1970s landmark studio sessions (sympathetic in spirit to Stevie Wonder and Marvin Gaye’s game changing work from the same era) and released on CD and LP, Vento Sul (including a rare bonus track on the CD version) features extensive liner notes by San Francisco-based writer Allen Thayer (Wax Poetics) with exclusive interview content and song-by-song breakdown from Marcos himself. Fans new and old will finally have easy breezy access to these once hard-to-find Brazilian classics. ....Light In The Attic Records................

Marcos Valle radicalized from "Vento Sul"  in South Wind, the most experimental album of his career. Sambas psychedelic invaded the repertoire, composed in a hippie village and recorded with members of the O Terço group. The theme of the lyrics goes through bucolic climates, with many references to air, freedom and peace. Despite this, "Organic Revolution" opens the disc with heavy guitars and talking about death. Then it's just calm. "Blind Flight" could be part of the more spatial repertoire of the Grateful Dead, while "Let the World and the Sun Go", a first-rate folk-rock, comes to excite.

There are even more unusual songs such as "Face Barbado" and "Vento Sul", two beautiful hippy hymns, the frightening "Democústico" and the mezzo ballad, mezzo hard-rock "Mi Hermoza", sung almost falsetto.

Vento Sul is a rupture disc with traditional Brazilian music and it scared a lot of people. It has become a forgotten classic of Brazilian rock.......................

“Vento Sul, from 1972, is an album very different from the earlier records – I experienced a lot in terms of rhythms, harmonies, melodies, arrangements and instrumentation. O Terço, one of the best bands of the era, accompanied me in all this and we recorded it all together. I also counted on the collaboration of Fredera, Robertinho Silva and the talented twins Cláudio and Paulo Guimarães (they were also part of the band in our shows). The bonus track here is a verion I did for Odeon of “O beato”, a song that was part of the soundtrack for the novela ‘Selva de Pedre.’
I consider this album a very experimental one: it was practically created in a modest fisherman’s house that we rented in Búzios, in a communitarian spirit. It marked my ‘hippie’ era…
– Marcos Valle, liner note / blurb............

Elevated by a strong union between Valle and O Terço, Vento Sul’s magical spell of an album is a welcome addition to any South American friendly record collection and sits proudly with the best of Brazil. File after Os Mutantes and before Caetano Veloso.

When Marcos Valle recorded 1972's Vento Sul, he'd been a wildly successful, well-established songwriter, producer, and recording artist for nearly a decade, furthering the horizons of bossa nova and samba in the pre-MPB era. Due to that success, each successive recording brought higher expectations. In the face of mounting pressure, Valle dropped out for a bit, took a vacation, and in the process wrote the music for the album that was to become his hardest left turn to that point. Nothing could have prepared listeners for what transpired on Vento Sul (translation: South Wind). Even after the revolution tropicalia had wrought, this album was radical. The set was composed by Valle and brother Paulo Sérgio Valle in Buzios, then a mellow, out-of-the-way beach town that offered young people great surfing and a cosmic communal hippie vibe provided by the Valles and 14 companions who had taken the two-month summer retreat with them. When Valle returned to Rio, he sought to re-create the laid-back dreamy collaborative atmosphere of Buzios in the studio. He'd been backed live by Brazilian psychedelic, proto-prog rockers O Terço (translation: The Rosary), who included drummer and future guitar hero Vinicius Cantuária. He also employed arrangers Ian Guest and Hugo Bellard and studio aces such as guitarist Claudio Guimarães, drummer Robertinho Silva, and flutist Paulo Guimarães. Some of the music here retains undeniable elements of both bossa and samba ("Malena," "Rosto Barbado," and even the tripped-out "Paisagem de Mariana"), but they are wrapped in expansive psychedelic rock and baroque pop textures. Art rock makes its presence known in opener "Revolução Orgânica," with its contrasting hyper flute and hard rock guitar -- but make no mistake, this is not tropicalia; if anything it reflects the influence of O Terço most, and here too, samba makes its voice known in the bridge. There are Pet Sounds-era Beach Boys sounds, textures, and harmonies throughout, but best heard on cuts such as "Mi Hermoza" (even with its mean electric guitar breaks) and the instrumental "Bôdas de Sangu." "Democústico" is a hallucinatory, political, spoken word number, with phased wah-wah guitars, flutes, harpsichord, and Latin percussion. The title track, by contrast, with its layered piano, guitars, and stretched-to-the-breaking-point waltz rhythm, is so dreamy, spacious, romantic, and sparse, it's the set masterpiece. Vento Sul was greeted with hostility by Valle fans and critics alike, but time has proven that criticism unfounded. It remains one of Valle's most provocative albums, but it's also one of his most beautiful, mysterious, and enduring ones.....by Thom Jurek...allmusic...........

I’m in the middle of the album. Five songs are already recorded. I’m certain that they are going to be some of the best things I’ve ever done. As good or better than “Samba Demais” (my first album) or “Viola Enluarda.”
The songs on this album were made with much care and tranquility, and I sincerely think that it’s been a long, long time since I’ve done anything that pleases me so much. I’ll say the same for the lyrics by Paulo Sérgio. We’re giving you the full picture of what we’ve recently been sketching out in our music. Nothing rushed, no worries about commercialism.
Paulo Sérgio came up with the idea to form a group. We formed one. It was a wonderful idea.
Sérgio, VInicius, Cézar, Frederico, Paulo e Cláudio (twins), Robertinho e Maurício Maestro. Musicians and people of the highest caliber.
We are working like eight arrangers. Every day we get together to hang out and talk and the ideas for each song keep coming. And the result couldn’t be better, I think; we all think so.
The album cover is from Juarez Macho, logically. Renato is responsible for the production and I can say that he also is part of the group, because he’s collaborating like a motherfucker with us on this album.
We are lucky to have the recording technicians are Zilmar and Nivaldo. Milton Miranda is the Director of Production, and is also one of the most sensational people I’ve ever known.
It’s all there.
– Marcos.................

So here were are (finally) with the next installment as the Brothers Valle continue their trend of changing the approach to songwriting and recording and continued to make ingenious decisions regarding their musicians and production choices. This album features the band O Terço as part of the backing band, which unfortunately for Brazilians of a certain age will be associated with wanky overblown progressive rock from the mid-70s. But in their early days they were much more psychedelic, and I make no apologies for my own soft spot for early 70s prog. And on this album O Terço sounds more like the earliest O Terço than O Terço actually did by 1972 — the dreamy, acoustic haze from when Jorge Amiden was in the band (see the ‘Karma’ album also posted here). Also in the musician credits are stalwarts like Robertinho on the drums and Paulo Guimarães on flute

The marriage is a happy one. The album was recorded in Búzios, which was practically a hippie commune that received famous visitors like Joplin and Mick Jagger in the years leading up to this album, before it blew up into an overpriced tourist trap. It is the first album since 1963’s “Samba Demais” to feature songs that were not written by at least one of the Valle brothers. The collective creative process on this album is evident by how smoothly tunes like “Vôo cego” by Cláudio Guimarães and “Paisagem de Mariana” (Frederyko) fit in with the Valle’s tunes. In fact “Vôo cego” (or ‘Blind Flight’ in English) is one of my favorite songs on the album. It is followed by a beautiful instrumental tunes, ‘Bodas de sangue’, that was arranged by Ian Guest, someone I don’t know much about other than the fact that he also has album credits on Donato’s “Quem é quem” and on some Milton Banana Trio albums; and that, contrary to his very English-sounding name, he was in fact Brazilian and an important figure in jazz circles and taught quite a few students a music professor. The song is followed up by the quirky, somewhat experimental, somewhat silly ‘Democústico’, where you’ll hear an agogô played in an afoxê rhythm balanced against squiggly wah-wah guitar lines.

The lysergic textures of this record can hypnotize the unwary, so do not listen to this while operating heavy machinery. The title song “Vento sul” has an open, meandering, incompleteness to it that is equally charming and beguiling. Reflective lyrics dealing with the identity politics of alternative lifestyles in the tune ‘Rosto barbado’ give way to playfully schizoid moodshifts in ‘Mi hermoza’, which alternates between open acoustic strumming and big aural spaces to a chugging midsection that is about as hard-rocking as the Valles are likely to get. Sounds as much or more like an O Terço song than the tunes here actually written by O Terço members, in fact. It is followed by “Paisagem de Mariana”, a song that fits flows nicely in its surroundings and which bears a pretty heavy stylistic similarity to any number of Milton Nascimento/Ronaldo Bastos/Fernando Brandt compositions between 1970 – 72. “Deixa o mundo e o sol entrar” is a another gorgeous tune anchored in acoustic guitars with careful piano, occasional drums, and a meandering melody line that is as warm as the song’s title. It is a perfect finale for this masterpiece-in-miniature. For this reissue, I actually wish they had included a minute of blank audio / silence at the end in which to collect our wits. Not that “O beato” doesn’t fit with the rest of this — oddly enough, for a telenovela track, it is as equally hazy and tripped out as anything else on this disc. But the original album has a kind of poetic closure to it with “Deixa o mundo” that gets a bit lost when followed immediately by another song.

Since it is sandwiched in Valle’s discography between two giant albums, ‘Garra’ and ‘Previsão do Tempo’, it seems like `Vento Sul` may have gotten overlooked to some degree. At least one of my Brazilian friends who is old enough to have been alive when this album was released (unlike myself), and who is also more of an O Terço fan that I am, was completely unaware of it until I passed along this reissue to him. And as much as I personally love this album, it lacks any obvious hit singles or even anything that jumps out as particularly “catchy”, which could turn off listeners who are particularly enamored with the Valle Brothers’ pop sensibilities. Even though it has ‘big names’ attached to it, this album FEELS obscure, with repeated listenings never quite diminishing the sense that we are privy to some aural hidden treasure and secret between friends. These are qualities that should put it high up on the list of favorites for anyone into ‘cult’ favorite psychedelic Brazilian music from the late 60s and 70s. Marcos, in his blurb (too short to be called liner notes, really) seems to insinuate that this album is kind of an exception or even diversion in his discography, an experimental side-trip. It may be that, but it is also an exploration and perhaps a deepening of some of the aural territory he had already been traversing in the previous two albums. The next album, `Previsão do Tempo’, marks a return to more structured compositions, soul and funk influences, and songs that are easier to sing along to when you play them loudly. But don’t shrug off this album – it deserves a careful listen, with or without additional chemical enhancement................

Marcos Valle's followup to the splendid and definitive Garra avoids attempting to replicate the magic of that album, instead opting for an entirely new direction full of the lets-grow-our-hair-eat-granola-and-live-off-the-land hippie philosophy so prevalent at the time. This edition comes as a 180-gram album pressing with original art expanded on a gatefold old-school “tip-on” jacket; includes in-depth liner notes interviewing Valle and includes the lyrics in Portuguese & English. During the hot Brazilian summer of 1971, Marcos and Paulo Sergio Valle, along with their significant others and six additional couples (comprising members of Brazilian band O Terço, whose drummer Vinicius Cantuaria would subsequently make a name for himself in Caetano Veloso's band and more recently as an acclaimed solo artist), rented a few modest fisherman shacks in the small village of Búzios to escape from Rio’s more populated beaches. The focus was making music and soul searching, as was the practice for affluent young hippies back then. They stayed for two months. “I wanted to go in a new direction,” says Marcos looking back. “I wanted to try out a rock influence and to risk a little bit more.” Shifting away from the studio musicians used on 1971’s Garra, Vento Sul (translation “South Wind”) was a rewarding collaboration with Brazilian progressive rockers O Terço. Originally released in 1972, Vento Sul not only channeled the Búzios beach bum vibe, but also manifested a floating dream like psychedelic sound. Any way you spin it, this is a groundbreaking release and now available stateside via Light In The Attic as part of their four-album Marcos Valle reissue campaign. Vento Sul features extensive liner notes by San Francisco-based writer Allen Thayer (Wax Poetics) with exclusive interview content and song-by-song breakdown from Marcos himself. Fans new and old will finally have easy breezy access to these once hard-to-find Brazilian classics. Elevated by a strong union between Valle and O Terço. About half of this album consists of Valle's usual irresistible catchiness, and the rest sounds like somebody's been listening to a lot of Pink Floyd and smoking a lot of pot. It's utterly fascinating overall, only rarely lapsing into tediousness and/or self-indulgence, which were common currency in post-hippie music circa 1972. Vento Sul’s magical spell of an album is a welcome addition to any South American friendly record collection and sits proudly with the best of Brazil. File after Os Mutantes and before Caetano Veloso. .................................. 

Tracklist
A1 Revolução Orgãnica
A2 Malena
A3 Pista 02
A4 Vôo Cego
A5 Bodas De Sangue
A6 Democústico
B1 Vento Sul
B2 Rosta Barbado
B3 Mi Hernoza
B4 Paisagem De Mariana
B5 Deixa Mundo E O Sol Entrar

Marcos Valle – vocals, piano
Ian Guest- orchestration and arrangements on `Bodas de sangue`
Hugo Bellard – orchestration and arrangements on `Deixa o mundo e o sol entrar`

O Terço:
Sérgio Hinds – electric guitar and coro
Vinícius Cantuária – drums, second vocal on ‘Revolução orgânica’, coro
César das Mercês – bass, and coro

Cláudio Guimarães – electric guitar
Fredera – electric guitar on ‘Pasagem de Mariana’
Robertinho Silva – drums, percussion
Paulo Guimarães – flute

johnkatsmc5, welcome music..

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