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Friday, 30 June 2017

The Doors "Live in New York" (The Doors Live Album) 2009 (Recorded in 1970)

The Doors  Live in New York (The Doors Live Album)  Felt Forum, January 17-18, 1970 6 CD`s  Released: 17 Nov 2009 
full 6 CD`s 
https://vk.com/wall312142499_6229


Double LP collection contains The Doors' first show from the Felt Forum in New York City on the night of January 17th, 1970 in its entirety. Recorded just a few weeks before the release of Morrison Hotel...


This six-disc compendium contains the complete run -- four sets over two nights -- by the Doors' at the Felt Forum in New York City January 17 and 18, 1970. Although previously unavailable in its entirety, music from these programs has shown up prominently throughout several live packages -- namely Absolutely Live (1970), and Alive She Cried (1983). Additionally, over an hour was excerpted to create the "Live in New York" CD within The Doors Box Set (1997). Most any unissued live material from the original quartet of John Densmore (drums), Robbie Krieger (guitar), Ray Manzarek (keyboards/vocals) and Jim Morrison (vocals/percussion) could be considered cause for celebration. However, the experience of hearing the band's ebb and flow as they organically develop the performance in real-time -- as opposed to hearing a package of material that has been cherry-picked after the fact -- is one of several advantages that the Live in New York (2009) anthology has over its predecessors. Another is the stunning fidelity throughout, thanks to the work of Doors' original producer/engineer Bruce Botnick and the exhaustive processes of restoring the eight-track, open-reel master tapes. With so much territory to cover -- over seven hours in all -- there are, inevitably, a few audio dropouts. In those rare instances, very good quality substitutions from other sources (of the exact same material) almost seamlessly fill in any moments that might be missing due to reel changes and the like. Always a question mark in terms of performance quality, Morrison is on pretty good behavior and in exceptional voice. Immediate evidence can be found on the soulful reading of "Blue Sunday" from the first show. However, by the final outing, his husky and raspy vocals make it clear that he is rapidly losing his range. Morrison has also cleaned up his stage prattle in the wake of the infamous occurrence where it was alleged that on March 1, 1969 in Miami, FL Morrison exposed himself during the show. A warrant was subsequently issued for his arrest on one felony count of lewd and lascivious behavior and three misdemeanor counts of indecent exposure, open profanity, and drunkenness. Certainly far from scared straight, he seems to have gotten the message, and was actually awaiting trial at the time of these recordings. He even jokingly refers to it during the spoken "Only When the Moon Comes Out" interlude on the 18th. On paper, there is little variance between each of the four set lists. However, the energy and vibe vacillate significantly from version to version and show to show. The core inclusions of "Roadhouse Blues," "Ship of Fools," "Alabama Song," "Light My Fire," and a combo pairing "Back Door Man" with "Five to One" were played every time. While "Alabama Song (Whisky Bar)," "Break on Through (To the Other Side)," and "Who Do You Love" were done a bit less frequently. On the other hand, there are rarities aplenty as "Blue Sunday," "Love Hides," "Little Red Rooster," "Crawling King Snake," a half-hearted "Wild Child," "The End," "Celebration of the Lizard," "Close to You" (sung by Manzarek) -- plus the four-song encore on the 18th that includes "Rock Me Baby," "Going to N.Y. Blues," "Maggie M'Gill," and "Gloria" were only unleashed once. During that same finale, former Lovin' Spoonful co-founder John Sebastian (harmonica) is invited on-stage. According to Bruce Botnick's "technical note" found in the accompanying liner notes booklet: "When John came onstage to join The Doors for the Sunday second show encore, he was handed a microphone that was only going through The Doors' sound system, and not plugged into the Fedco Audio Labs mobile truck. As a consequence, John's harmonica didn't get recorded. So, earlier in 2009, we arranged for John to join Ray Manzarek and myself at Skywalker Sound in San Rafael. John replayed his parts as closely as possible against the PA leakage from the audience tracks on the original recorded 8-track masters." Purists will be able to use a code on the Rhino Web site (www.rhino.com) to download the untampered versions...... by Lindsay Planer...allmusic..


2009 six CD box set that contains all of the Doors' performances in their entirety recorded in 1970 at the Felt Forum in New York. All four shows were mixed and mastered by the band's long-time engineer, Bruce Botnick, who recorded a number of shows from their 1970 tour. While most of the music in the collection has never been released, a few songs appeared on the 1970 release, Absolutely Live and in the 1997 box set. Elektra......


One of the best Doors live releases to date. The Doors were really cookin when they performed these shows. You can tell the band had a lot of fun doing these performances. Bruce Botnick mixed these recordings really well. It is a shame there was only one run of this amazing box set and this is out of print. There is a 6 CD edition of this, 2 LP's and a MP3 version. The 6 CD edition of this live album goes for ridiculous prices online since it is out of print. Your best bet is to buy it at a mom and pop record store or book store for a decent price.The vinyl record edition can easily be had for a decent price but does not include all the tracks. If you really want to save money and space get the MP3 version....ByJmetal86.....


There is very little, if any, that one could criticize about this CD set. This weekend at the Felt Forum in January of 1970 represents all that was/is pure about live music. It transcends the onslaught of all the failed attempts (for the consumer) at re-marketing, remastering and AAD conversions perpetrated by the music industry directed to it's dedicated customers. Going from AM radio to 45's to LP's to 8 tracks to cassette to reel-to-reel to CD's to digital media and back to remastered CD's - I still LOVE the music that played such an important part in my personal growth. And when it is THIS good I've come to LOVE it at a substantially greater/different level. Despite the fact that my parents literally locked me in my room that weekend in January 1970, to prevent me from sneaking to any of the Door's shows, it was a bonus to purchase this set and enjoy a truly unadulterated display of creativity. In my humble opinion the four nights are NOT the same shows but four separate performances each with it's own identity. An audiophilic Doors fan MUST HAVE. A "must have" for any fan of live/studio music. Pass the banner to the next generation. A symbolic and impressive gift to yourself or special one - Democrat or Republican. Considering the cost of a concert ticket, here your cost is $12.00 per show which is not much more than $5.50 for an Orchestra Seat at the Forum. Cost today for the Door's @ Felt Forum - Orchestra seating???? Some things are good enough to be true. P.S. I did pay $32.00 each ($26.00 more) for four seats which I consequently gave to my older sister (she didn't go)....By challenged1......


Wow, What a great album! I Just received this album today, and I've already listened to it twice. This is a truly great concert from the doors later years. & It sounds incredible on vinyl! Better than my CD! I'm very impressed with the purchase. Highly recommend the seller Newbury comics. Buying Anything by the doors, & especially this album... I'm 38, so I didn't get the pleasure of seeing the doors live. Crank it up &This album played after "absolutely live" is as close as one can get, I'd like to think. This is well worth the $30+ that i paid, IMHO. Now I need to buy another copy of this album, so I don't have to flip the records :D....Byjeff t kaspar......


So I'm 13, and I'm slouching through Harvard Square on my way to get Pink Floyd boots at the used record store. I'm just starting to grow my hair long-- which never really worked out-- and I'm wearing a grey t-shirt sporting the hundred-yard-stare of Jim Morrison of the Doors. From across the street, a guy three times my age shouts: "Fuck! Yeah! The Doors!" And for that moment, we are brothers. 

*The Kids in the Hall'*s Bruce McCulloch argued that Doors fans are born, not made. But he ducks the question of why we're not making them anymore. Today, one of the first standard-bearers of rock is less hip than Journey. Let's review the case against the band: First we have Morrison himself, who's been blown into a caricature by his super-sexual persona, his wifty poetry, and his early death in a Paris bathtub. The music sounds like a weird cross between shit-kicking blues-rock and brain-spraining acid-jams, and it's easier to get your avant-garage fix from the Velvet Underground, your rock shaman verse from Patti Smith (or not at all), or your psychedelic extravagance from countless Nuggets bands. As dead 1960s rockers go, Jimi's legacy has left Janis and Jim in the dust. It may be a strange way to put it, but the problem with the Doors is that they were not efficient. 

Let's say that's where you are with this band. So here's how this set might change your mind......by Chris Dahlen...Pitchork....


Whatever one thinks of Jim Morrison's status as "Poet" (the sole epitaph on his Père Lachaise Cemetery tombstone), The Doors' effectiveness as a live unit is undeniable. Rarely have three rock musicians pumped out music with the degree of dynamic intensity achieved here, while Morrison's charismatic, brooding good humour remains one of rock'n'roll's classic frontman strategies. 

Covering four concerts from January 1970, the performances spread across the six CDs of Live In New York would be Morrison's last American shows with The Doors. They presented fans with a slightly different singer than the outrageous legend who was even then awaiting trial for alleged onstage exposure – podgier and less lizardly than in his previous sex-god image. His mood is surprisingly light, genially bantering with the audience over things like the meagreness of a proferred reefer ("You can pick your teeth with a New York joint") and stage invaders ("Well, that's New York for you – the only people that rush the stage are guys!"). By this time, Morrison was more enamoured of being "an old bluesman", and his boozing had tempered his poetic excesses. Instead, the material drawn from the forthcoming Morrison Hotel album featured more direct, earthy lyrics, even including bouts of absurd scatting on the infectious "Roadhouse Blues"s. 

Fulfilling his blues longings, alongside the new songs and old favourites such as "Break On Through" and "Light My Fire" could be heard covers of things like Howlin' Wolf's "Back Door Man" and Jimmy Reed's "Going To New York Blues", balanced in the final show by the 16-minute poetic indulgence "Celebration Of The Lizard", one of the performances culled from the shows for the Absolutely Live double-album. Sadly, the thousands of edits required to compile that earlier live album left the original tapes in scattered tatters, so this definitive account of the shows has been pieced together from various sources, with consequent occasional slight dips in sound quality. Guest John Sebastian's blues harmonica parts on three of the final encores, meanwhile, were PA system, and thus absent from the tapes – so he has been brought in four decades later to re-create his original parts. 

The result is a formidable confirmation of the band's power, studded with individual highlights – Robby Krieger's taut guitar solo on the second show's "Ship Of Fools", Ray Manzarek's interpolation of quotes from "Play With Fire" into "Break On Through" – but ultimately demonstrating that the best bands are not necessarily comprised of the most technically gifted players, but those most flexible and instinctively attuned to each others' requirements.....by..Andy Gill ..........Independent.



Earlier this week, I posted an item to Twitter (sorry, I refuse to use the word ‘tweeted’ in regard to any action I’ve ever taken) saying that I was listening to Rhino’s latest box set, The Doors: Live in New York. The response I got was immediate, negative in tone, and came from two colleagues who know a little something about music. One took a shot at Jim Morrison, the other at drummer John Densmore. The subject of the Doors has always been, and apparently still is, a provocative one. Battle lines are drawn. Feelings are strong on both sides. In the end, the fact that a simple mention of the band evokes such reaction, 40 years after the fact, is itself commentary on the band’s legacy. 
Madison Square Garden opened in 1968, the fourth building in New York City to bear that name. In addition to the world famous arena, home to the New York Knicks, and New York Rangers, and the site of many legendary concerts, the complex includes what was then called the Felt Forum. The theater, which can seat up to 5,600 people for concerts, was named after then-Garden president Irving Felt. 

On January 17 and 18, 1970, the Doors showed up to play four shows, two a night, at the Felt Forum. In 1969, they were one of the first rock bands to play Madison Square Garden itself, but opted to play the smaller Forum the next time around in order to recapture the intimacy with the audience that had characterized their early career, and to take advantage of the superior acoustics that the Felt Forum offered. It was just a few weeks before their album Morrison Hotel would be released. 

The first thing you notice is how good these recordings sound. All of the shows were mixed and mastered by the Doors long-time engineer, Bruce Botnick, who recorded a number of shows on the 1970 tour. Most of the music spread out over the six sprawling discs that make up the set has never been released, but a few of the tracks did surface on Absolutely Live in 1970, and on the Doors Box Set in 1997. 

These days a major band will rarely do two shows in one night, but it was more common in 1970. Most people at the time suspected that the late show would always be better. After all, set length for the second show was not limited by the need to change the house over for another show, plus the band had more time to become inspired, if you get my drift. The Doors: Live In New York proves that those suspicions were valid, if only for this band, at these shows. Take the first two shows of the run on January 17 as an example. The first show is good, but pedestrian. None of the band’s classic lengthy jams are included in the set list. The second show that night was a different story. Morrison and his audience are clearer more into it. The set is longer, and we get extended versions of both “When the Music’s Over,” during which Morrison gets a little belligerent with a somewhat overenthusiastic audience, and “The End,” which opens with ringing bells and the haunting specter of Morrison shouting “bring out your dead” again and again. 

The same thing happens the next night. The first show of the evening is once again good, but somewhat tamer. The second show is not only much longer, with more intensity from the band and the audience, there are special guest appearances as well. The Lovin’ Spoonful’s John Sebastian sits in with the Doors for several songs. A little rock trivia note for you; it was Sebastian who played harmonica on the studio version of “Roadhouse Blues.” Also guesting that night was drummer Dallas Taylor, best known for playing with Crosby, Stills & Nash. There’s also a stunning, maddening version of the rarely performed “Celebration of the Lizard.” From that second show, here is an absolutely savage version of Click to listen“Back Door Man,” which segues beautifully into an equally intense version of my favorite Doors song, Click to listen“Five to One.” Note the outstanding guitar work from Robbie Krieger on these two tracks. He and organist Ray Manzarek are brilliant throughout these shows. 

The Doors dip into the not yet released Morrison Hotel album, opening each of the four shows with “Roadhouse Blues,” and “Ship of Fools,” “Peace Frog,” and “Maggie M’Gill” each make one or more appearances. The band also taps their classic, self-titled debut album for “Break on Through (To the Other Side),” “Soul Kitchen,” and of course their first #1 hit “Light My Fire.” Blues covers abound, including Bo Diddley’s “Who Do You Love,” Howlin’ Wolf’s “Little Red Rooster,” and John Lee Hooker’s “Crawling King Snake.” In the interest of presenting complete shows, we also get a number of breaks that are labeled as “Tuning/Breather.” While I recognize the need for tuning, the inclusion of the breaks on these recordings tends to break the momentum of the shows more than anything else. Apparently Botnick and the surviving Doors agreed on the importance of having complete shows, and the purists will be pleased. I could have done with less tuning, and more playing. 

Live In New York being a Rhino release, it goes without saying that the packaging is first rate. The small hardcover book that accompanies the discs features essays by James Henke, Chief Curator of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Museum in Cleveland, producer and engineer Bruce Botnick, and Elektra Records Founder and Chairman Jac Holzman. If you are a Doors fan, I’m afraid you’re going to have to dig deep and get this one. Essential is the only word to describe it. If you’re merely curious as to what all the fuss about the Doors was, there are less expensive ways to get into the band, but none of them capture the band’s live magic, and Morrison’s massive appeal, better than this set. 

One last note: the cover of the box is a reproduction of a ticket from the Felt Forum shows. The price of an orchestra seat? $5.50. That wouldn’t even begin to cover what you pay in Ticketmaster fees for a ticket these days.....by....Ken Shane.....



The Doors, well known for releasing the same material over and over again in a new package (hello original six albums), have done much to atone for those sins since 2000. That year, they set up Bright Midnight Records, which was dedicated to releasing uncut, un-doctored live material from the band’s archives…the same archives they claimed were barer than die-hard fans knew. They’ve released some very excellent product, including most of the material recorded for Absolutely Live. This includes full, uncut and professionally recorded shows from Detroit, LA, Philadelphia, and other locales. They haven’t released as many shows as originally envisioned, but what they have put out has been reverent. The only real hiccup along the way was the Matrix release from 2009, which was a great opportunity to finally provide an official outlet for well known bootleg material (the four Matrix shows over two days in early 1967). 

Finally, finally, they deliver what fans have been clamoring for, especially since Bright Midnight was established: all four Felt Forum shows in their entirety, uncut, and (for the most part) un-doctored. We get six CDs, and only a little bit of this was ever officially released before; bits were included in Absolutely Live/In Concert, and the 1997 box set had a single disc that cherry-picked tracks from the four shows. 

This release, another highly recommended gem, just about rounds out the Absolutely Live material. In January, 1970, The Doors played four shows over two consecutive nights at New York’s Felt Forum, the smaller concert venue under the main Madison Square Garden arena. (They played the main arena in January 1969, but for their new tour, post-Miami, they opted for the superior acoustics and intimacy of the Felt.) Both nights they played an early and a late show, and packed a lot of material into each. Not only were these shows recorded in their entirety, but they sound (for the most part) like great shows. 

While Absolutely Live and other older Doors live material were the product of Paul Rothchild’s great talents as a producer, splicing together numerous takes of a single song to create the best-sounding concert album experience, the Bright Midnight releases revel in what fanatics and the bootleg-obsessed have always been interested in: complete, un-doctored shows. The good news is that the band and particularly Bruce Botnick (original Doors sound engineer) are very open with exactly what was done with the source tapes. Since those tapes were cut up for previous releases, there are gone-forever snippets here and there, and they went through a painstaking process to review the two-track live tapes versus the eight-track masters in order to determine exactly what was missing. In those cases, they swapped in parts of another 1970 show that fit the mood. You would be pretty hard pressed to identify these snippets in your ears, the work is seamless. 

The biggest manipulation here is actually the overdubs done by John Sebastian, who joined the Doors on stage for one of the shows but whose harmonica was not picked up by the mic. I believe the ‘bare’ tracks will be released online, so fans can get both. 

Many will note the differences between the early and late shows on each night. Typically, the later shows are longer and a bit more revved up, including longer jams and more improv. However, having four professionally recorded shows is a major bonanza. Once again, all of the in-between tuning, crowd noise, and chatter is included (tracks are titled ‘Tuning / Breather’, for instance). Yes, these tend to break up the momentum, and we now realize that bootleggers were regularly trimming these breaks to death in order to fit shows on a record or CD, but they reflect how the band performed. You’d be much harder pressed to see a band today that took a long breather between songs, and indeed, The Doors famously never agreed on a set list before each show, but rather let the vibe and the audience dictate where they would go. This was the band getting back to just the music, and returning to the blues work that defined their earlier club days. They also play several tracks from the not-yet-released Morrison Hotel. 

Despite the glut of recent quality releases, Doors fanatics know that there is a good chunk of material still out there, ripe for the official outlet. This includes a number of professionally recorded or broadcast shows, including Seattle, 1970 (by many accounts a poor show with a very drunk and distant Morrison), Vancouver 1970 (significantly better), and the Isle of Wight performance, a crisp, broadcast version having been available on bootleg for over a decade. And there’s plenty more if they want to get back into releasing audience stuff (the Boot Yer Butt box, while expensive, had some very, very rare material, though some of it was in horrendous quality). 

Highly, highly recommended for the Doors fan. New fans, too…if you want a great intro to the live Doors, and a lot of value, this set is a great boon. Note the cover of the box, which reproduces an actual ticket from these shows, and the $5.50 price of an orchestra ticket. You can still go to the Felt Forum today (which has since gone through about 100 name changes), but for $5.50 you might only be able to get a box of Cracker Jacks...classic rock review....


Rhino and Bright Midnight Archives unleash four inspired performances from The Doors‘ final tour with Live In New York. The latest addition to the band’s acclaimed series of archival concert releases, this six-disc collection contains all four of The Doors’ performances – in their entirety – recorded in 1970 at the Felt Forum in New York City. The collection will be available November 10 at all retail outlets, for suggested list price of $89.98 for the physical boxed set. A digital version featuring select highlights from all four Felt Forum shows will also be available at all digital retail outlets for $9.99.
The year prior to these shows, The Doors became one of the first rock bands to play New York City’s Madison Square Garden. When they returned in 1970, Densmore says they chose to play the Felt Forum, a smaller venue at the Garden. “It was more intimate, and you could feel the audience more,” he says. “There was more interaction, and the acoustics were much better, because it was designed for music.”
Fans will be blown away by the crisp sound found on Live In New York. All four shows were mixed and mastered by the band’s longtime engineer, Bruce Botnick, who recorded a number of shows from The Doors’ 1970 tour on multi-track tape for the Absolutely Live album. While most of the music contained on Live In New York is unreleased, a few songs (and portions of songs) surfaced in 1970 on Absolutely Live and in 1997 on The Doors Box Set.
Prior to the release of Live In New York, Rhino will release 180-gram vinyl versions of all six Doors studio albums on September 15. Previously available only in 2007’s The Doors Vinyl Box, original stereo mixes of The Doors’ six albums will now be available individually at all vinyl retail outlets..





Jim Morrison - vocals
Ray Manzarek - organ, keyboard bass, vocals on "Close to You"
Robby Krieger - electric guitar
John Densmore - drums
John Sebastian - Harmonica on "Rock Me", "Going To N.Y. Blues" & " Maggie M’Gill"
Dallas Taylor - drums on "Going To N.Y. Blues" 









Tracklist
Jan. 17, 1970, First Show 
1-01 Start Of Show 1 4:27 
1-02 Roadhouse Blues 4:21 
1-03 Ship Of Fools 6:29 
1-04 Break On Through (To The Other Side) 4:23 
1-05 Tuning/Breather 2:03 
1-06 Peace Frog 3:15 
1-07 Blue Sunday 2:27 
1-08 Alabama Song (Whisky Bar) 
Written-By – Bertolt Brecht, Kurt Weill 
1:51 
1-09 Back Door Man 
Written-By – Willie Dixon 
2:28 
1-10 Love Hides 0:32 
1-11 Five To One 5:07 
1-12 Tuning/Breather 1:25 
1-13 Who Do You Love 
Written-By – Ellas McDaniel 
5:54 
1-14 Little Red Rooster 
Written-By – Willie Dixon 
6:24 
1-15 Money 
Written-By – Berry Gordy, Jr.*, Janie Bradford 
3:17 
1-16 Tuning/Breather 1:35 
1-17 Light My Fire 8:45 
1-18 More, More, More 1:59 
1-19 Soul Kitchen 6:34 
1-20 End Of Show 1:02 
Jan. 17, 1970, Second Show 
2-01 Start Of Show 2 2:10 
2-02 Jim "How Ya Doing?" 0:49 
2-03 Roadhouse Blues 6:18 
2-04 Break On Through (To The Other Side) 4:52 
2-05 Ship Of Fools 6:55 
2-06 Crawling King Snake 
Written-By – John Lee Hooker 
5:19 
2-07 Alabama Song (Whisky Bar) 
Written-By – Bertolt Brecht, Kurt Weill 
1:50 
2-08 Back Door Man 
Written-By – Chester Burnett, Willie Dixon 
3:51 
2-09 Five To One 5:38 
2-10 Pretty Neat, Pretty Good 0:11 
2-11 Build Me A Woman 4:06 
2-12 Tuning/Breather 1:15 
2-13 Who Do You Love 9:35 
2-14 Tuning/Breather 2:08 
2-15 Wild Child 1:44 
2-16 Cheering/Tuning 1:00 
2-17 When The Music's Over 15:09 
3-01 Tuning/Breather 2:22 
3-02 Light My Fire 9:41 
3-03 Hey, Mr. Light Man! 2:05 
3-04 Soul Kitchen 6:38 
3-05 Jim's Fish Joke 1:11 
3-06 The End 19:51 
3-07 End Of Show 1:38 
Jan. 18, 1970, First Show 
4-01 Start Of Show 3 1:02 
4-02 Roadhouse Blues 4:29 
4-03 Ship Of Fools 6:08 
4-04 Break On Through (To The Other Side) 4:40 
4-05 Tuning/Breather 0:48 
4-06 Universal Mind 4:54 
4-07 Alabama Song (Whisky Bar) (False Start) 
Written-By – Bertolt Brecht, Kurt Weill 
1:24 
4-08 Alabama Song (Whisky Bar) 
Written-By – Bertolt Brecht, Kurt Weill 
1:59 
4-09 Back Door Man 
Written-By – Chester Burnett, Willie Dixon 
3:14 
4-10 Five To One 6:04 
4-11 Tuning/Breather 1:22 
4-12 Moonlight Drive 5:55 
4-13 Who Do You Love 
Written-By – Ellas McDaniel 
7:25 
4-14 Calling Out For Songs 0:26 
4-15 Money 
Written-By – Berry Gordy, Jr.*, Janie Bradford 
3:14 
4-16 Tuning/Breather 1:23 
4-17 Light My Fire 10:12 
4-18 More, More, More 2:05 
4-19 When The Music's Over 12:10 
4-20 Good Night/End Of Show 0:34 
Jan. 18, 1970, Second Show 
5-01 Start Of Show 4 1:51 
5-02 Roadhouse Blues 5:42 
5-03 Peace Frog 3:45 
5-04 Alabama Song (Whisky Bar) 
Written-By – Bertolt Brecht, Kurt Weill 
2:01 
5-05 Back Door Man 
Written-By – Chester Burnett, Willie Dixon 
2:22 
5-06 Five To One 6:23 
5-07 We Have A Special Treat 3:33 
5-08 Celebration Of The Lizard 16:47 
5-09 Alright, Let's Boogie 0:07 
5-10 Build Me A Woman 3:30 
5-11 When The Music's Over 12:37 
5-12 More, More, More 1:59 
6-01 Soul Kitchen 7:54 
6-02 For Fear Of Getting Too Patriotic 1:13 
6-03 Petition The Lord With Prayer 0:48 
6-04 Light My Fire 11:28 
6-05 Only When The Moon Comes Out 1:23 
6-06 Close To You 
Written-By – Willie Dixon 
4:03 
6-07 The Encore Begins 5:03 
6-08 Rock Me 
Harmonica – John Sebastian 
Written-By – Muddy Waters 
6:02 
6-09 What To Do Next? 5:53 
6-10 Going To N.Y. Blues 
Harmonica – John Sebastian 
Written-By – Jimmy Reed 
4:42 
6-11 Tuning/Breather 0:49 
6-12 Maggie M'Gill 
Harmonica – John Sebastian 
7:33 
6-13 Tuning/Breather 0:29 
6-14 Gloria/End Of Show 
Written-By – Van Morrison 
13:01 

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