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24 Jul 2017

Annexus Quam “Osmose” 1970 Germany Kraut Rock,Jazz Rock,Experimental



Annexus Quam “Osmose” 1970 Germany Kraut Rock,Jazz Rock,Experimental

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One of the most interesting and unknown bands from the Ohr catalogue, Annexus Quam had actually a quite long career, having their roots in the outfit Ambition Of Music, formed back in 1967 Kamp-Lintfort (near Düsseldorf). By 1970, and paying tribute to their early name, they had incorporated a whole array of influences (most important one, the inclusion of jazz instrumentation) and brewed them in what was becoming a very personal progressive fusion of styles, best witnessed in their their debut album: Osmose. At that time, the band had grown into a septet formed by Uwe Bick (drums, vocals, percussion), Jürgen Jonuschies (bass, vocals, percussion), Werner Hostermann (clarinet, organ, vocals, percussion), Peter Werner (guitar, vocals, percussion), Hans Kámper (trombone, spanish guitar, vocals, percussion), Ove Volquartz (sax) and Harald Klemm (flute, vocals, percussion). Far from a typical jazz sound, they were able to integrate rock and jazz instrumentation into a unique style, which borrowed elements from the aforementioned genres but blended those into an ultimate cosmic fusion (which can recall at times the Third Ear Band, Xhol Caravan or even Ash Ra Tempel yet remaining totally their own). Actually, Annexus Quam were able to sound meditative, doomy, stoned, aggressive, exotic and lyrical in the same track without loosing any musical coherence or perspective. With their personal style that even today defies categorisation (except for that big umbrella we call kraut rock),Annexus Quam had all the inventiveness and excitement of the 1969/1970 german bands. Osmose: a most unique album by an equally unique band, housed in one of the most luxurious, ellaborated and tripped-out gimmix covers ever made, now reproduced in all it’s multi-folding glory. Strictly limited to 500 copies - Gimmix folding-pyramidal cover!.............

This little known masterpiece of kosmiche psych from Germany from 1970 very much defines the 'krautrock' sub-genre of progressive music evoking a highly hallucinagenic atmosphere and trippy ambience that the early German experimental rockers were known for(such as Amon Dull II, Can, Faust or Ash Ra Tempel). Annexus Quam distinction on this their debut was that they developed an otherworldly and mystical atmosphere from a loose improvisational framework of a jazz/fusion format containing woodwinds, flute and keyboards in addition to tradional bass, drums, guitar. In each of the four divisions of the title track, the band settles into a groove and organically develop increasingly hypnotic and effect loaded soaring improvisations which litteraly invoke a feeling of being carried away into space. Unlike fusion, the performances are not virtuosic, but each instrument improvises into the basic groove of the song and carries the music into avant-garde and psychedelic texture invoking an atmosphere much like Pink Floyd's "Saucerful of Secrets" or "Ummagamma". There is excellent percussion throughout and beautifully integrated musicianship; you can tell the musicians listen to each other quite well. This is an essential recording for psych/krautrock fans. Also you may want to explore the similarly hallucinagenic and demented kraut band DZYAN, whose album 'Electric Silence' is a wonderful piece of psych madness....ByWarren W. Nelson.........




This is a weirdly beautiful album. Recommended for fans of German giants "Amon Düül II". This album crosses the limits of all your imaginations. The sound ranges from jazzy rock style Frank Zappa to psychedelic sounds of many early German krautrockers. There are a number of instruments used here, Clarinet, Trombone, Saxophone, Trumpet all add a mesmerising touch to the usual heavy guitar leads and haunting percussions. I wouldnt be exaggerating if I labelled this as avant-prog instead. Too bad this was another one of those records that got lost among the massively huge 70s rock scene....

Starting out as early as 67 under the name of Ambition Of Music, AQ is one of those early 70's wonder in Krautrock, all the more legendary for having their two albums released on the famous Ohr label, even if both are fairly different from each other. On this debut album, AQ is a septet with most of the members being multi-instrumentalists, and their debut contained four unnamed tracks (two short and two long ones), the whole thing packaged in a many foldout artwork sleeve making this album rather expensive in its vinyl form. Not everything is perfect on this album, especially in the numerous fade-outs (some in-built in the tracks), but overall the album is a pure joy to have.
The music presented on this album is strange form of psychedelic jazz-rock (a bit like if Nucleus met the Saucerful-era Floyd), which reminds me a bit of Missus Beastly's early albums. The first two tracks are the short ones but not necessarily the easiest to cope with, far from it, really!! The first is a very-slow track that is unbelievable heavy which freaks out completely into heavy spacy-echoed sounds. Grandiose. The second track is a much faster three-minute affair, which stands a bit alone out of line with the rest of the album's style, but it is absolutely nothing shocking. This is the rockiest and least jazzy track on the album and the weakest. The first of the long tracks (rounding up side one) is an altogether different affair with its almost 11-mins and its Nucleus-styled brass section cross with an organ that you'd swear is played by a certain Mr Wright, while the wordless vocalizings is reminiscent of a raunchier Wyatt on Third. This is, along with the leadoff track, Osmose's apex.

The second side is taken up by the sidelong 18-min+ track, which bases its sound on the previous tracks but it has some lengths, especially in the percussion passage about two thirds of the way into the track and losses itself.

As their following album will follow two years later, under a fairly different line-up, being much more improvised free jazz, Osmose is from far AQ's best works and very much essential to early Krautrock history. All I have seen so far is a Spalax label reissue of this album (which I heard is OOP), but hopefully this will be reissued with the Kollodium bonus track on the Ohrenschmaus sampler album. Much worth the eavesdropping even if it is flawed.....by Sean Trane 


ANNEXUS QUAM were one of the great German 70's underground experimental, psychedelic progressive rock acts. Musically and sonically ANNEXUS QUAM play an interpretation of cosmic prog rock with heavy allusions to fellow acts EMBRYO, COSMIC JOKERS, "Atom Hearted Mother" era PINK FLOYD and Klaus SCHULZE. No question this music is quite psychedelic with mesmerizing passages, space imaging and even sound effects. This album actually reminds me very much of the PINK FLOYD album "Atom Hearted Mother" with its sinister vocal choruses, psych song structures and guitar phasing. Without a question this album ranks for me as one of the true essential German 70's space prog rock albums....by loserboy ..


Annexus Quam's legacy in the world of krautrock stood somewhere between the frontal jazz-rock fusion of Embryo and the ethnical-exotic excursions of early Agitation Free and Amon Düül II, generally leaning a bit closer to the former. Annexus Quam, as an ensemble, chooses to restrain the potential explosiveness of typical psychedelia while keeping an energetic vibe and an exploratory expressiveness to their music. Lots of inputs in the wind department (including a keyboardist who also plays clarinet), two guitarists with one of them doubling on trombone, almost every musician adding extra percussion together with the drummer - this disposition is more than ideal for the organization of extensive jams, and that's basically what AQ is all about. The guitar phrases and the solid rhythm section set up the coordinates in which the group's sound meets its functional ordainment. Their debut album "Osmose" is a feast for all lovers of trippy experimental prog. 'Osmose I' kicks off quite languidly, like a shade of light that illuminates the dawn's sky for sleepy eyes. 'Osmose II' shows a noticeable intensity increase, with a tribal-meets-funky pulsation augmented by a rocking vibe. The almost 10 minute long 'Osmose III' is the band's first expression of expansion and continuing feedback. Starting with an electric blues inspired basis in a slow tempo, very "Ummagumma", indeed. As the track goes on, the energy grows in a cleverly sustained manner, combining subtlety and intensity. The 18-minute 'Osmose IV', which filled the vinyl's B side, is the monster track. The Embryo similarities are easy to notice (although no rip-off or real imitation takes place). Juergen Jonusches' bass lines assume a leading role in many passages - in fact, it is the aleatory rhythm section's occurrences that set the mood for all the sections that go emerging as the track goes on. Some weird chanting married to tenor sax lines bring a playful lysergic mood. Between minutes 10 and 12 comes a drum solo accompanied by mesmeric pastoral flute lines and mysterious acoustic guitar phrases. After that, a series of sax, trumpet and trombone touches come by and by, creating an alternative to the duet of electric and acoustic guitar, while the drummer, once again, brings yet another solo without paying attention to what their partners are performing. This apparent sensation of chaos reveals, after a second or third listening, a clever exercise in the dadaistic textures of musique concrete and the unpredictable flows of free jazz. Full of improvisation and challenging moods, while not being excessive nor creepy, Annexus Quam's "Osmose" proves a solid hidden gem in the history of the most avant-garde side of prog.... by Cesar Inca ...............


'Annexus Quam', a German band released in 1970 their first record 'Osmose', a mixture of Psychedelic Rock, Blues and Jazz improvisation, similar to early 'Pink Floyd' and 'Grateful Dead' with a jazzier side like 'Embryo'. 'Osmose' presents four improvisational exerpts, the shortest being only 3 minutes the longest clocking in about 18.The overall athmosphere is laid back and spacy (mainly due to the slow rhythms and heavy use of Echo) giving the whole record a psychedelic feeling ( early Pink floyd) with a Jazz touch (large use of woowdwinds and brass). 
'Osmose I', the first track establishes a psychedelic athmosphere with a short intro for guitar and & sax and evolving into a slow organ blues, a dreamy trombone solo and some space guitar. 

'Osmose II' the shortest track, developes a bouncing uptempo rhythm between the bass an drums over which Uwe Bick places his spacy vocalizes reminding Roger Waters ( the whole track reminds Floyd's 'Careful With That Axe Eugene'). 

'Osmose III' the last and longer part on side one, presents a heavy slow blues, with great guitar work -a repeated arpeggio motive-, followed by a jazzy trombone solo, a jazzy guitar solo and organ washes. About half of the track the rhythm changes and developes a more psychdelic athmosphere with a spacy flute solo. 

'Osmose IV', the longest and stylistically most interesting track, mixing Jazz, Psychedelic and Spanish music, starts with an acoustic piano intro, evolving into a jazz groove with drums and bass , followed by jazz guitar, a trombone solo and again some spacy vocalizes. After 5 minutes the rhythm slows down giving space to a heavy echo-slide- guitar section over cymbal strokes ( quite similar to 'Set the Controls' ). A bass line establishes a rhythm change, followed by another slide-echo-guitar section leaving place to a percussion-only passage, that evolvess into a spanish flavored rubato section for acoustic classical guitar and trumpet with reminiscences to the 'Concertio De Aranjuez' followed by a jazz groove and ending with a psychedelic organ and drumlroll section. 

A highly interesting record that combines jazz improvisation with Psychedelic, Blues and World elements.....by Alucard 



This is pretty much an all instrumental album with some vocal melodies here and there.The seven member band play a variety of instruments including flute, sax, clarinet, trombone, bass, organ and guitar with most of them playing percussion. The sound is mostly relaxed with some psychedelic passages making an appearance once and a while. I guess you could say this is music to veg out to. 
"Osmose I" is a slow moving track that opens with reserved horns and flute for a minute.Then guitar, organ and percussion enter this psychedelic soundscape. Various spacey sounds follow with more relaxed horn melodies. "Osmose II" is more uptempo with percussion and vocal melodies leading the way. "Osmose III" is over 10 minutes long and closes out the first side of the album. Dual horns, percussion and guitar a minute in as the organ arrives. Vocal melodies after 3 minutes in this relaxing and dreamy tune. This sounds so good. Guitar and flute dominate 5 minutes in with that relaxed beat. 

The final track "Osmose IV" is a side long suite at over 18 minutes in length. It opens with piano as a catchy melody of percussion, horns and guitar follow. 6 1/2 minutes in the song calms down as we are left with mostly percussion. Flute joins in 11 minutes in as it helps create a nice sound. 16 minutes in the melody stops as we get different sounds coming and going the rest of the way. 

Another excellent Krautrock album for you fans to check out........ by Mellotron Storm ...



Osmose is a prime example of the psych jazz-rock direction in the early Kraut scene. In this area everything has to answer to Miles Davis, but with this strong collection of songs, Annexus Quam's debut deserves to be up there with the best. 
The first track is short but heavy, sounding like Pink Floyd doing a slowly grinding funeral march. The drum parts remind of Nick Mason's early style, slow but entrancing, with hallow pounding toms. The second piece is more upbeat, with dazed organs and stoned wordless vocals accompanying the snake-charming pulse. 

The longer pieces present a mix of early Floyd (Careful With That Axe) with jazz-rock similar to Nucleus' and Soft Machine's early albums. The music flows freely in unexpected directions and might probably sound too disjointed or too experimental for most listeners. I adore it though; it evokes a dream world full of weird and mesmerizing scenes. 

This album remained largely unnoticed, unknown and buried under the weight of 40 years of rock history, but it has been an outstanding discovery. Not an essential title but an excellent companion next to your Nucleus, Soft Machine and Dzyan albums............by Bonnek .


Annexus Quam's first record, originally released in 1970, is a peculiar mix of psychedelic rock and jazz, one of those distinctly Krautrock records from that era. There are plenty of spacy sound effects as well as drugged-out vocal moaning, while primitive rhythms pound away with savage ferocity, especially on the second track. The longer third cut slows things down slightly, with plenty of soloing of guitar, keyboard, and more vocal moaning over the rhythmic washes of sound and ragged percussion, and then adds in some cosmic electric guitar riffing toward the end. The side-long fourth track is far mellower, as a piano leads into a relaxed but swinging number that is far jazzier than the rest of the disc, though still based more in underground rock than jazz. The piece soon takes on the psychedelic weirdness of the earlier tracks as it starts to sway off kilter with more wordless vocals and studio effects and many transitions of sound. Annexus Quam (Osmose) is not quite rock and not quite jazz, but is a very nice listen for more adventurous listeners from either school, especially in the light of more recent post-rock developments.....by Rolf Semprebon..


A purple haze, this. And I'm not even making any stupid, clichéd reference to LSD or to the Hendrix song (referencing LSD). I mean, literally : haze that's purple-coloured.. with shades of blue and pink maybe. With distant moaned vocals and an early morning "feel bad" kinda hangover, and a dusty, washed out ancientness to it.

There is also something a bit "rural retreat" to it - but a rather decrepit and threatening one at that.

To me, this might be the best album on the Ohr label, alongside Guru Guru's UFO and that first Ash Ra Tempel record......by....snow_over_mongolia ......

Wonderful, atmospheric German Jazz-Prog mix. It does feel too minimal at times, and I wished it was longer. That said, what's on here is great to listen to while looking at the stars. It's very trippy (some say this sounds like the soundtrack to a dream, which is pretty accurate), and the performances are beautiful and excellent. Great album to relax to....by........Bishopboy1999 

Annexus Quam was a German band consisting of 7 members. A variety of instruments from guitar and organ to sax, flute and clarinet color the sound in a variety of ways. The first track opens with the wind instruments before abrasive guitar and organ join the fray. Pink Floyd's "Welcome to the Machine" comes to mind. In fact, Pink Floyd was an obvious influence, particularly early mach 2 Pink Floyd, throughout this album.

Track 2 features a rather repetitive bass line with gurgling organ and "scary" vocals over an interesting drum pattern.

Track 3 features the return of the wind instruments with a finger picked guitar melody at a very slow tempo with lots of atmosphere. There are some vocalizations that I didn't care for, but this gradually shifts moods and styles in a very slow manner that is quite pleasing.

Track 4 was, in the days of vinyl, a side long piece that starts with solo piano and slowly builds, adding instruments as it progresses. This track also features the best use of the wind instruments on the album. It's also the closest they come to building up a head of steam. Once again, like Floyd, they get to a certain tempo and ride it. This piece breaks down about 2/5ths of the way through it with a cool percussion section, and flowing guitar and wind instruments. Flute then comes in over tribal drumming before drifting off into noodling mode.

Overall a fine album, but nothing that floors you right away. A record that reveals its secrets slowly, much like the tempo of the music it contains.....by.....nitsnats ...
Pretty psychedelic krautrock album with some very clear jazzy elements. Osmose was the first album released by Annexus Quam and it does it's job pretty well. When I think about some of the greatest krautrock albums of all time I might not think about this album though. The A-side is good with parts I, II and III of the title track. The B-side has just "Osmose IV" which might also be the best of these parts with it's jazzy and also a bit jam oriented feeling.

3,5 stars is exactly what I feel about this record. It's definitely a good krautrock record but not a complete masterpiece of the genre. Recommended for the fans of krautrock but don't expect to hear a cornerstone of the genre like Tago Mago or Yeti.....by......CooperBolan ...............

Great, mellow spacy jams that are somewhat jazz influenced and feature horns, trippy sound effects, and echo guitar. For sure this is one of the best albums on one of the very best expermential music record labels of the early 70's German scene. This has a definite opium den vibe to it. Great gimmix cover too with eight flaps that fold every which way, but with not matter what combination of flaps you choose the picture always connects too make a loop.....by...thirstymoon .........

The Ohr label. No other name evokes the musical experimental wanderlust such as the almighty Ohr. No mistaking its distinctive pink ear and green letter design, and catch phrase "Macht das Ohr Auf!" (Roughly translated "The Ears Open"). And Super Stereo Sound! Bands with names like Tangerine Dream, Ash Ra Tempel, Guru Guru, Embryo, Mythos and.... Annexus Quam. As if that wasn't enough, speaking of Annexus Quam, how about a crazy gimmix cover that opens on all 4 sides so as to make a 3D pyramid? These eye and ear catching displays of creativity had to be beyond exciting for those clued into the German underground in 1970. How many were is anybody's guess, but 20 some years later, anyone who had an inkling of rock's experimental history, were clamoring to unearth any of these treasures of the past. And 20 years past that, most of the 30+ some albums from the label are enshrined into the conscientiousness of anyone who claims hipster status. And we're still in the discovery phase here, as far as overall awareness is concerned.

OK, it's time to focus on the music, which isn't something Annexus Quam were always keen to do. This was especially apparent on their ill advised followup album on Ohr, "Beziehungen", a free-jazz noise fest that was at once unbearable and frighteningly tedious. Fortunately for all concerned, their debut would have none of it, and "Osmose" stands as a testament to the original forebearers of creativity, an era that has yet to be revived much less surpassed. This despite the multitude of experimental individual recordings that are dumped each week at our feet only to find they are made by talentless hacks sitting at their laptops and strumming a $6 pawn shop loaner and crooning out of tune lefty ballads for the sick and tired and poor. That is to say, tunes about themselves.

Not so Annexus Quam though. They're in a ramshackled flat, rigged up as a day camp studio, dragging in every instrument they can find or invent. If they can play the instrument - great. If they can't, even better. These 7 dudes were experienced jazzers on the circuit, in with the now-sound and out with the old. Flip on the recorders man, we're ready to play! So much was the intense deep planning for this set, that they even named the songs ahead of the recording. "Let's go with '1.A' '1.B' '1.C' and, oh I've exhausted my brain now, so let's just go with '2'". Play.

Trombone, sax, flute, fuzz guitar, percussion, drums, organ all at once, obviously anxious to get started from the dense pre-planning sessions on song titles. Ritualistic and tribal. Grandiose. Majestic. Each of the sounds are panned from speaker to speaker, as Ohr producer Julius Schittenhelm is having the time of his life twiddling every knob he can find. And then some. It's a religious experience that can go for hours, and perhaps did in real time, though unfortunately "1.A" is cut short at a mere 4 minutes.

For "1.B", Annexus Quam finds the early groove and jams, while disembodied voices hum, no, haunt, over the proceedings. Organ, sax and percussion are in the drivers seat. I repeat, it's a religious experience that can go for hours, and perhaps did in real time, though unfortunately "1.B" is cut short at a mere 3 minutes.

"1.C" introduces a somber melancholy, as trombone and a fuzzed out sax (or is it a clarinet?) carry the lyrical lines, and a guitar mournfully plays somewhat unplugged in the background. There's that organ again WAAAA-AA-AAA. WAAAA-AA-AA. Hard to phonetically grasp the effect, but it's so very Krautrockian in its execution. Then the disembodied voice returns. The overall effect evokes a dreamed out trance of epic proportions. It's at once vivid and lucid, but ultimately blurry. Or "brurry" in its current state. The perfect blend of ingredients for the Ohr styled Krautrock recipe. The band settles on the floor and begins the raga trance, with an Indian like scale played on the electric guitar, while percussion and what sounds like an amplified violin soars on top. The intensity builds as the flute adds an urgency that wasn't there. Where are we going anyway? Annexus Quam will take us there, wherever it is. I repeat, it's a religious experience that can go for hours, and perhaps did in real time, though fortunately "1.C" is 10 and a half minutes of bliss and happiness.

Now we get to Side 2, flip the record (hypothetically speaking of course), and begin the long journey of the verbosely named "2". It starts in almost academic waters, with a solo piano motif. Before too long the bass and percussion join in and it's time to begin another jam session as the trombone and guitar begin to wreak some havoc. Will we get the phased organ and disembodied voice? Yes! But instead of closing off the session as on Seite 1, they let this one dally on. To loiter about. Perhaps they're sprinters and not marathoners? Hard to say, but it does get a mite slow going for some of the last 10 minutes or so. It was a foretelling of the future of Annexus Quam. The endless jam. Not a religious experience. The potential to be a Top 50 album of all, only to let the sand slip through the fingers of time.

In the end, Annexus Quam are an understated bunch, never really reaching the insane climaxes of their brothers in undergroundia like Tangerine Dream, Guru Guru or Ash Ra Tempel. Instead they have given us another aural glimpse into a point of time. A crystal clear snapshot of an urban flat, Germany, 1970. And we were all there to witness it. Through a 3D pyramid...by.......ashratom ........

2nd pressing on purple vinyl. 'Annexus Quam had actually a quite long career, having their roots in the outfit Ambition Of Music, formed back in 1967 Kamp-Lintfort (near Düsseldorf). By 1970, and paying tribute to their early name, they had incorporated a whole array of influences (most important one, the inclusion of jazz instrumentation) and brewed them in what was becoming a very personal progressive fusion of styles, best witnessed in their their debut album Osmose. At that time, the band had grown into a septet formed by Uwe Bick (drums, vocals, percussion), Jürgen Jonuschies (bass, vocals, percussion), Werner Hostermann (clarinet, organ, vocals, percussion), Peter Werner (guitar, vocals, percussion), Hans Kámper (trombone, Spanish guitar, vocals, percussion), Ove Volquartz (sax) and Harald Klemm (flute, vocals, percussion). Far from a typical jazz sound, they were able to integrate rock and jazz instrumentation into a unique style, which borrowed elements from the aforementioned genres but blended those into an ultimate cosmic fusion (which can recall at times the Third Ear Band, Xhol Caravan or even Ash Ra Tempel yet remaining totally their own). Actually, Annexus Quam were able to sound meditative, doomy, stoned, aggressive, exotic and lyrical in the same track without loosing any musical coherence or perspective. With their personal style that even today defies categorization (except for that big umbrella we call kraut rock),Annexus Quam had all the inventiveness and excitement of the 1969/1970 German bands. Osmose is a most unique album by an equally unique band, housed in one of the most luxurious, elaborated and tripped-out gimmix covers ever made, now reproduced in all it's multi-folding glory. Gimmix folding-pyramidal cover!'....

Line-up / Musicians
- Uwe Bick / drums, vocals, percussion
- Jürgen Jonuschies / bass, vocals, percussion
- Werner Hostermann / clarinet, organ, vocals, percussion
- Peter Werner / guitar, vocals, percussion
- Hans Kämper / spanish guitar, trombone, vocals, percussion
- Ove Volquartz / saxophone, flute
- Harald Klemm / flute, vocals, percussion

Songs / Tracks Listing
1. Osmose I (4:15)
2. Osmose II (3:11)
3. Osmose III (10:36)
4. Osmose IV (18:20) 

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