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29 Jul 2017

Atavismo ‎"Inerte" 2017 Spain Psych Prog Limited release of 200 copies second album


Atavismo ‎" Inerte" 2017  Algecira Spain Psych Prog Limited release of 200 copies second album

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https://atavismo.bandcamp.com/album/inerte

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If you need to, take a second and get your brain properly excited for how good the second Atavismo album is going to be. Remember how frickin’ excellent their 2014 debut, Desintegración (review here), was when that arrived, and then go ahead and picture something even broader in its scope and with more depth of melody and tone. Something more progressive but not necessarily less ethereal. I’m telling you it’s one of the best records you’re going to hear this year, and yes, I say that having heard it. I’m usually shy about saying that kind of thing, but I got this one early and it’s just pure immersive bliss. It’s out April 7. I’ll be reviewing it Feb. 21 with a track premiere, so watch out. I’m already stoked to be able to share some of it with you.

Already indicating the trio's qualities and prog fundament, I can remember their debut 'Desintegracion' from 2014, which already attracted my attention. However, this new album, just released on Temple Of Torturous Records in these days, surely is a step forward to something really superb. The five songs, two of them crossing the ten minute border, are well thought out compositions. They are still reserving enough space for some instrumental excursions, though on the other hand will step away from a jamming attitude basically. Furthermore to state, I would say it's not that usual to use native lyrics.
Let's start with the opener Pan Y Dolor and the band's rhythm backbone, consisting of Mat (bass) and Pow (drums). Both are serving a tremendous groove, partially tending towards southern rock throughout. All members are also responsible for the subtle use of vintage keyboard stuff including mellotron and farfisa. Anyhow, Pot's electric guitar is dominant over the course, first of all the fantastic centerpiece El Sueno evolves to a magical showcase. A swinging La Maldición Del Zisco then appears with moog support and surprising facility.

Belleza Cuatro offers a fine blend of psychedelia and shoegaze where Volarás comes with charming polyphonic vocals, evolves into an atmospheric orientation soon, close to Airbag respectively Pink Floyd. 'Inerte' is another effort which contrasts pleasantly from the vast number of albums presented to this concept of genre in recent times. Enjoyable from the first to the last minute, developed with much empathy, including prominent mix and sound quality. Excellent move, ATAVISMO!...by Rivertree .


Progressive power trio, ATAVISMO, have today announced details of their upcoming sophomore album, entitled Inerte. The five-track album will be released on April 7, via Temple of Torturous Records. 

Hailing from Spain, and with a critically acclaimed debut album, Desintegración, already under their belts, ATAVISMO are exploring new territories with their second full length release. Breaking away from the space rock jams of their debut, ATAVISMO have maintained a psychedelic edge, only this time around the evolution of the band is reflected in their more compact, progressive sounds. 

The writing process starts with a jam session – as many great creations do – before a firmer structure is applied to the songs. Lysergic lyrics revolve around soulful feelings, love, and bad dreams which the band describe as “existential poetry”. The result, among other things, is a submersion into the Andalusian rock legacy of the legendary band Triana, without losing sight of more current means of understanding psychedelic or progressive rock from bands like Black Mountain, Wolfpeople or Motorpsycho. 

Already considered one of the most exciting and eclectic bands emerging in their home country, Inerte looks set to secure ATAVISMO similar acclaim world wide. Inerte was recorded in October 2016 at Trafalgar Estudios, El Palmar (Cádiz), Spain...


Expectations for the second album from Spanish trio Atavismo were set pretty high following their gorgeously cosmic and serene 2014 debut, Desintegración (review here). Inerte makes short work of them. Expanding from four to five included tracks, it sees guitarist/vocalist/synthesist Jose “Poti” Moreno (ex-Viaje a 800, Mind!), bassist/vocalist Mateo and drummer/vocalist Sandri Pow (also ex-Mind!) push brazenly past the fluid textures of their first outing and hold onto some sense of ethereal psych-jazz jamming — hola, “El Sueño” — as they find ultimately more progressive footing.

Released like its looser-feeling-in-hindsight predecessor through Temple of Torturous, Inerte answers some of the questions the band posed with the space-rocking single “Haribo” (discussed here) and affirmed for their audience that they’ll not necessarily be defined by one course or another, one sound or another, and that their goal is far more individualized than to simply execute the tenets of heavy psychedelia, space or prog rock, even as their aesthetic pulls from each of those and more besides. Songs like “Belleza Cuatro” and opener “Pan y Dolor” offer distinctive moments of resonance marked by beautiful melodies and rhythm that can either be insistent and winding, as in “Pan y Dolor”‘s first half, or barely there at all, something carrying the song forward like a gentle river current, as in the drifting guitar-led midsection of the aforementioned, 11-minute “El Sueño.” This nuanced blend is presented with a lush but natural production captured this past October at Trafalgar Estudios in Cádiz, and does nothing across its 42-minute span to rescind the invitation to the listener issued by its in medias res launch.

The tighter feel of Inerte and the uptick in progressive influence from Atavismo is as immediate as that launch itself. A quick, fuzzy lead line careens into forceful Iberian acoustic strum as the vocals arrive for the first verse. It happens fast, but is welcoming nonetheless, and a play back and forth between the electric and acoustic ensues between chorus and verses for the next several minutes, Moreno and Pow and Mateo singing together in classically prog form as a kind of mini-chorus themselves — an element of space rock willfully repurposed and put to excellent use. Shortly before the halfway point of its eight-and-a-half-minute run, “Pan y Dolor” breaks into a wash of guitar and keys/Mellotron that is as hypnotic as it is joyous, with just an undercurrent of foreboding, cutting itself off at 6:48 in order to reintroduce the acoustic strum and resume the song’s prior course, as if to say, “don’t worry, it was just a dream.” It may well have been, and if so, it wasn’t the last.

“Pan y Dolor” builds to its conclusion and “El Sueño” kicks in with lower tone and a deceptively fast tempo, Mateo‘s bass more prominent in the mix. This is the bed over which vocals soar for another soon-arriving verse, and their being somewhat more drawn out — notes held longer — than the opener prefaces the turn into calmer fare that the second track makes at about the 4:20 mark, the tension Atavismo have thus far mounted seeming to let itself go in favor of more improvised-sounding jamming driven by fuzzed-out psychedelics and effects flourish that settles in a delight of meandering wah and builds to an apex over its last couple minutes as it recalls its own early going without necessarily returning to it outright. That jam carries Inerte‘s longest inclusion to its finish and the finish of side A, ending in a cymbal wash and surge of guitar noise that emphasizes the live feel it has fostered all along.
Centerpiece “La Maldición del Zisco” backs sparse guitar with a steady bass and drum progression and fills out its arrangement with keys, using the guitar more as an outward-ringing accent to its early verses, spacious and patient, before it at last launches into what one might call its chorus right around three minutes in. It’s a moment of taking flight through sound and Atavismo make the most of it in terms of thrust, but they’re still not forcing the song to go anywhere it doesn’t want to go.

They dip back into the verse easily and return to the mostly-instrumental chorus quicker the second time through, then proceed to jam their way out of the track, fading to silence just before the seemingly complementary “Belleza Cuatro” — the two are the shortest cuts on Inerte at 6:18 and 5:18, respectively — takes hold in a soothing trance of liquefied guitar and keys. Its importance in being positioned as the penultimate track before 10-minute closer “Volarás” shouldn’t be understated, and as Moreno, Mateo and Pow drift toward that grand finale, they do so with no less purpose behind them than they had rushing at the outset of “Pan y Dolor.” Vocal harmonies echo under sweet lines of guitar and softly-thudding drums, and a louder, fuller tone rises in the second half, but they still cap quietly, which gives the percussion/keyboard opening of “Volarás” an even more dramatic sensibility. This is something of a ruse, on the band’s part — another dream, maybe — because just after three minutes of building to who knows what, they juke left and shift into a particularly Floydian blend of lightly-strummed guitar, keys, bass and drums, a memorable keyboard line serving as the core around which the rest is placed.

This will be the movement that carries Atavismo out of their second record, and it seems to be a final highlight of the point that their progression is by no means a settled issue. It is striking how many different looks the band gives in these five tracks and how able they are to tie them together as a single flowing work. As “Volarás” quietly makes its way out, Inerte seems to have done as much through understatement as through its reaching new heights, and if it’s in that balance that Atavismo will find their place, then all the better. Whatever they do going forward — Moreno and Pow also have a new four-piece project in the works with former Viaje a 800 guitarist Jose Angel “Oceano” Galindo called Híbrido, adding intrigue to this release — Atavismo have exceeded the potential their debut showed with Inerte and given their listeners a work of depth and breadth that should be treasured for years to come. 


Spanish progressive space rockers Atavismo impressed on their debut release Desintegración, with it’s mid-period Pink Floyd influences providing a rather listenable experience. They now return with new release Inerte and, although they haven’t strayed too far from the formula, impress once again. Still in place are the liquified guitars reminiscent of Floyd’s ‘Echoes’, but also a new-found confidence in mixing in some quite funky vocals.
Completely delivered in their mother tongue, it is difficult to ascertain what they may actually be singing about, but this sense of disassociation adds the fun. That you never quite known where you are with the album is another great plus and as you get more and more drawn into the extended aspects of the songs, a sense of understanding embraces you. It’s the universal language of music and aside from the obvious niche space rockist trappings, this is where Atavismo excel.It’s almost impossible to separate the songs on here and from the opening ‘Pan Y Dolor’, a template is set in place of tribal vocals against bass driven excursions into space. ‘El Sueno’ bursts in on a powerful riff which drives the song forward. Later, the band get all spaced out on ‘La Maldicion Del Zisco’ whilst on final song ‘Volaras’, the tribal rhythms play off against B movie sci-fi synths before bringing us full circle again. 
Whilst the songs fulfil all genre necessities, it is in the seeming simplicity we find our enjoyment. By using the bass as an anchor, Atavismo colour the songs in little ways just to keep pushing at more exploratory avenues. There’s a sense of sun, and confidence abound and, on a song like ‘Belleza Cuatro’, a majesty unleashed. They’re the kind of band who always have a little left in the tank to surprise you. Why unleash all your tricks when you can slowly ease your way through? 
Where the band truly impress is in the full flow moments such as on ‘La Maldicion Del Zisco’, where they tease out the melody against a formidable backdrop of rhythmic tension. Never quite exploding, the tenseness of the song keeps you on edge, forever waiting for that release. Indeed, it also becomes a failing as you wish at times that they do just go full throttle into whatever spaced out dimension they are heading. All in good time though, maybe on the next album. 
Inerte is the kind of album that creeps up on you. It’s inbuilt familiarity brought on by the obvious influences enables you to fall in step with the band easy enough. Atavismo then continue to capture your attention through their measured approach to progression and progressive rock. Language restrictions may prevent them from truly breaking through, but in the world of space rock where the universal language is head music, they cannot fail. Another impressive release from them and we can only hope this rich seam continues....by Martyn Coppack.


Line-up / Musicians
- Pot / guitars, vocals, mellotron, farfisa, moog
- Pow / drums, vocals, mellotron, farfisa, moog, percussion
- Mat / bass, vocals, mellotron, farfisa

Tracklist
A1 Pan y Dolor
A2 El Sueño
A3 La Maldición De Zisco
B1 Belleza Cuatro
B2 Volarás

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