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13 Jul 2017

Gordon Jackson "Thinking Back"1969 UK Psych Acid Folk Rock




Gordon Jackson "Thinking Back"1969 UK Psych Acid Folk Rock

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An excellent folk-rock record, which is described in several places as "a lost disc of Traffic”, since all the members of that group collaborate, Dave Mason, Jim Capaldi, Steve Winwood, Chris Wood, as well as Jim King and Ric Grech (Family), Julie Driscoll, Meic Stevens, Reg King, The Blossom Toes, and some other. But here are other types of songs, something more intimate, more personal. Songs written by a talented but almost unknown musician, one of those many that did not accompany him the fortune factor, the kind that most of us have overlooked. The disc was published in 1969, in the record label Marmalade, with a roll of 2,000 copies, but with many problems of distribution and a null promotion. In addition, the early bankruptcy of the stamp was a bitter inconvenience for Gordon, who saw his ideals and situation vanish, since he was relegated to industry preferences, and saw other colleagues as they took off to a high status, in End, something we already know, not always the industry supports the genius …. 
The album was forgotten, and luckily, 36 years later, it is reissued by Sunbeam Records, with 5 additional bonus tracks, a carefully remastered audio, and a well-written libretto, with a good description of the songs, and Photos provided by the same Gordon, is even his daughter the girl who appears on the cover. Now you can hear it, if you want ….~ 
Although often described as a “lost Traffic album”, Gordon Jackson’s Thinking Back, upon closer examination, reveals itself to be something more. It’s true that almost every track on this rare 1969 album does have Dave Mason, Jim Capaldi, Chris Wood, and Steve Winwood playing on it, but what we have here is a highly personal collection of songs composed by a long-overlooked talent who was then at the crossroads of his career. 

In the beginning, there were The Hellions - a Worcester-based band who during the mid 1960s came close to breaking into the charts with a series of finely crafted pop singles. The line-up was drummer/vocalist Jim Capaldi, and guitarists/vocalists Dave Mason and Gordon Jackson along with bass guitarist Dave Meredith and John “Poli” Palmer on flute and vibes. 

The Hellions (minus Dave Mason and Meredith) with the addition of Luther Grosvenor, evolved into Deep Feeling who, produced by Yardbirds manager Giorgio Gomelsky, could well have developed into a force to be reckoned with. Ultimately, this was not to be and Deep Feeling were sacrificed when Jim Capaldi left to form the legendary Traffic along with Steve Winwood, Dave Mason and Chris Wood. Poli Palmer joined Blossom Toes and later became a pivotal member of Family. Luther Grosvenor went on to success in Spooky Tooth and later Mott The Hoople under the alias of “Arial Bender” 
Getting back to the story, following the demise of Deep Feeling, Gordon Jackson and Poli Palmer continued on as a song-writing team until Georgio Gomelsky offered Gordon a solo contract on his own Marmalade Records label. The result of this was the release of a single in 1968 by Gordon Jackson entitled Me Am My Zoo which was produced by Dave Mason as well as featuring the complete Traffic line-up. 
By late 1968, Gordon Jackson began the recording of tracks for his solo album in top London studios such as Advision, Morgan and Olympic with the sessions produced by Dave Mason. All the songs were composed by Gordon Jackson who sings the lead vocal and plays acoustic guitar on every track. Not only did the recordings feature Traffic members, a large number of other luminaries from the late 1960s British rock scene dropped by the studios to contribute. The list includes Gordon’s former Deep Feeling band-mates Poli Palmer and Luther Grosvenor, Chicken Shack’s Robbie Blunt, Julie Driscoll, Rick Grech, Jim King and Meic Stevens, percussionist Rocky Dzidzorni as well as members of the Blossom Toes. Even Gordon Jackson admits he was never certain who would drop by to play on the sessions!‘Thinking Back’ was issued on the Marmalade Records label in July of 1969 with an initial pressing of around 2,000 copies. Despite the obvious potential of such a release, there were immediate problems with distribution and the record received little if any promotion. The financial collapse of the Marmalade label came as a bitter blow to Gordon Jackson who had already endured the loss of his previous band and was now consigned to the back-benches of the music business while watching many of his former colleagues enjoy high-profile careers in other bands. Thirty five years later, Gordon Jackson’s long-lost solo album was given the chance it deserved and re-released on the Sunbeam Records label. We are now fortunate to enjoy it for the first time on the CD format along with five additional bonus tracks. 

The Sunbeam Records issue of Gordon Jackson’s Thinking Back comes attractively packaged with reproductions of the original album artwork including the front cover featuring a portrait of Gordon’s daughter Cherie as well as various other original photos supplied by him. The CD booklet has a detailed track listing with information about who played on what, and an informative and well-written Gordon Jackson biography by Richard Morton Jack. The audio quality is very good as copied from the original master tapes although I do detect some “crackles” on a couple of the bonus tracks and surmise they were recorded from surviving vinyl or acetates.The album opens with a fantastic track called 'The Journey’ which I must say, could not sound more like it came from Traffic’s Mr. Fantasy LP if it wasn’t for Gordon Jackson’s distinctive vocal. The recording has all the trademarks of that great psychedelic Traffic sound complete with tabla, sitar and eastern influences but with a wonderful melody that makes you want to play it over and over again. The song even received airplay on John Peel’s 'Top Gear’ and would have made a fine single release. 

This is followed by 'My Ship, My Star’ - a slow and beautiful track featuring acoustic guitar and piano. Possibly the most vividly personal song on the album, Gordon Jackson’s plaintive vocal comes close to cracking on this one which only adds to the fragile and atmospheric depth of the recording. 
'Me And My Dog’ was originally titled 'Me Am My Zoo’ when it was issued as the A-side of a single in 1968. The song is irritatingly catchy with a simple melody and inane lyrics that are out-of-character with the rest of the album but is highly listenable none the less. The track features all the Traffic members - Steve Winwood (bass, piano), Dave Mason (slide guitar), Jim Capaldi (drums), and Chris Wood (flute). The instrumental build-up towards the end of the recording is quite memorable and is appreciated further with the inclusion of the longer unedited version as a bonus track on this CD. 
'A Day At The Cottage’ was the non-album B-side to this single and composed by Gordon Jackson while staying at the legendary “Traffic cottage” in Berkshire. The track chugs along with a rather “loose” feeling to it while sounding very much a product of the moment. This recording again features the entire Traffic line-up along with Gordon’s lead vocal but the production is somewhat less “polished” than the songs on his album. 

The highly-driven 'Song For Freedom’ is really one of the stand-out tracks on the album. With Gordon Jackson’s acoustic intro, it combines a fantastic rhythm section powered along by congas courtesy of Rocky Dzidzorni and Jim Capaldi’s characteristic drumming along with Dave Mason’s distinctive bass. You can really dance to this one and indeed will have a hard time resisting the urge to! Brilliant backing vocal by Julie Driscoll (of Brian Auger and The Trinity) who almost topped the charts in 1968 with 'This Wheel’s On Fire’. Note also the atmospheric tenor sax and organ contributed by Chris Wood and Poli Palmer respectively. 

'Sing To Me Woman’ is an all-out rocker and one of those recordings that were highly characteristic of the period. Again with a powerful acoustic intro, the record features some stinging electric guitar from Dave Mason and a good saxophone solo from Chris Wood. The track was apparently composed during a late-night jam session and has a great “live” feel to it. In fact, most of the tracks on this album have that feeling of spontaneous energy and a sense that all involved were having a good time recording them. 
The next track on the album 'When You Are Small’ (which at seven-plus minutes is also the longest) opens with a vocal introduction from Steve Winwood and then slips into a laid-back groove similar to what the Beatles would create on their Abbey Road recording of 'Because’. Gordon Jackson’s use of the electric sitar contributes much to the atmosphere on this track which also features Steve Winwood on bass and piano. Lyrically, it’s a trip back in time to Gordon’s youth and may have been the inspiration to Thinking Back as the title of the album and his observation that “Thinking back to yesterday may help us find tomorrow”. 

The final track on the original album is entitled 'Snakes And Ladders’. This one is dominated by rather menacing organ and piano overtones from Poli Palmer along with acoustic slide guitar by Dave Mason. Watch out for the unexpected tempo-changes (Jim Capaldi did a great job holding this one together!) and the massed backing vocal on the choruses. It’s probably one of the more lyrically obscure tracks - something about climbing up snakes and falling down ladders - but hey it was, after all, the 1960s and so does it HAVE to make sense? 

I must admit to playing this album many times in the weeks before writing this review but with every play there was (and still is) something else new to be found. It’s unfortunate that Gordon Jackson’s career as a musician was cut short as his songwriting showed much originality despite his recordings existing under the shadow of Traffic’s towering legacy. Thinking Back is certainly worth exploring for those who are fans of the late 1960’s British pop/psychedelic/rock scene. It’s a trip where the journey is ultimately more satisfying than arriving at the destination. For fans of Traffic need I say more - just dive right in!…Brum Beat review…~ 


A rag and bone man trundling down a cobbled street with a sitar playing guru on the back of his cart. 

That’s what the opening track The Journey reminds me of. Gordon had previously played in a band with Jim Calpaldi who then formed Traffic with Steve Winwood and Co. This connection led to Traffic band members joining in for another lets make a record in the country. Whilst this is a great and worthy record it shouldn’t be considered as the lost Traffic album some reviewers would have you believe.Much looser in it’s overall execution than Traffic’s work it can at times sound like a jam performed over some pre-prepared lyrics, rather than song structures which have been worked out over time in a studio or country cottage.If Gordon is reading this I wonder if, in hindsight, he’d have preferred to have recordeded with session men in order for his work to be assessed without the comparisons…~ 

Gordon Jackson’s only album sounds a little like a Traffic LP with a singer who isn’t in the band. The similarity is really no surprise, since Traffic men Steve Winwood, Dave Mason, Jim Capaldi, and Chris Wood all played on the record, and Mason produced. Other notables with connections to the Traffic family tree or Marmalade label also appeared, including Luther Grosvenor; Rick Grech, Jim King, and Poli Palmer of Family; and Julie Driscoll. There’s a languid, minor keyed jazz-folk-psychedelic vibe to the songs, which have a meditative, spontaneously pensive air, appealingly sung by Jackson. Touches of Indian and African music are added by occasional tabla and sitar. What keeps this from being as memorable as Traffic or some of the other better late-'60s British psychedelic acts is a certain meandering looseness to the songs that, while quite pleasant, lacks concision and focus. That was a quality also heard in the album from the same era by fellow Marmalade artist Gary Farr, Take Something With You, and while Thinking Back is better and more original than Farr’s effort, the songs are more interesting mood pieces with a yearning, mystic tone than they are outstanding compositions. At times this is like hearing psychedelic sea shanties (as on “My Ship, My Star”), such is the lilt of the tunes, though hints of blues and more playful pop-psych whimsy are heard in cuts like “Me and My Dog.”…. by Richie Unterberger..~ 

Originally released on Marmalade in 1969, Jackson ’s lone solo album is the initial salvo from the new UK reissue label, Sunbeam, the brainchild of Steve Carr and rock scribe Richard Morton Jack. Marketed (somewhat correctly) as a long lost Traffic album, the release was produced by Jackson’s Worcester neighbour, Dave Mason and features various Traffic permutations (Mason, Chris Wood, Jim Capaldi, and Steve Winwood) throughout, with the entire quartet backing Jackson on the first single, “Me and My Dog” c/w “A Day at The Cottage,” whose non-LP B-side, which is included among several bonus tracks, is a reference to Traffic’s cottage in Berkshire, where blueprints for many of the album’s tracks originated from all night jam sessions). 

The album’s personnel reads like a Family tree of late 60’s UK rockedelica, including future Traffic bassist, Ric Gretch, along with his then-current partners in Family, Jim King and Poli Palmer (who also played with Blossom Toes, who appear on backing vocals), Luther Grosvenor (future Spooky Tooth guitarist who later changed his name to Ariel Bender and enjoyed much fame with Mott The Hoople), Julie Driscoll, and Reg King from The Action. In fact, Jackson originally played alongside Capaldi and Mason in the primordial Traffic lineups, The Hellions and Deep Feeling, the latter also featuring Palmer and Grosvenor. 

Rock history aside, the album itself is a wonderful amalgamation of jazz, psychedelia, and folk influences, with the opening track “The Journey” driven by Rob Blunt’s electric sitar and Mason’s throbbing basslines and “My Ship, My Star” softly drifting along the open seas like an early, acoustic version of Jethro Tull. The tearfully reflective “When You Are Small,” featuring Jackson on sitar and Winwood on bass, provides the lyrical inspiration for the album’s title and cover photo, a snapshot of Jackson ’s pouting daughter Cherie shedding a tear. 

Despite some warbly playback in the transfer from the original ?“ analog master tapes, the song perfectly captures the lost yearning for youthful innocence, occasionally reminding me of the later solo work of the Moody Blues’ Ray Thomas (cf., 1975’s "From Mighty Oaks”). “Sing To Me Woman” features some tastefully blistering guitar solos from Mason and is included here in both album and single mixes, as is “Song For Freedom,” while the extended jam version of “Me and My Dog” finds Traffic firing on all cylinders and is practically worth the price of admission alone, despite its annoying, midflight dropoff, as if the tape (or musicians) ran out of steam! Nevertheless, this is an essential purchase for Traffic and Family completists, as well as anyone interested in late 60’s UK rockedelica. …..by Jeff Penczak…..~ 

Singer, guitarist, and drummer Gordon Jackson released a rare album for the Marmalade label in 1969, Thinking Back, that bore much similarity to records of the era by Traffic and (more distantly) Family. The resemblance wasn’t casual, as several members of Traffic and Family helped out on the record, alongside other notables like Julie Driscoll and Luther Grosvenor of Spooky Tooth; Traffic’s Dave Mason, in fact, was the producer. Thinking Back had the same sort of loose mixture of psychedelic rock with jazz, folk, and bits of soul and world music that characterized some of Traffic’s work. The material wasn’t as strong or focused as Traffic’s or Family’s, but it had a nice introspective groove with haunting, minor-keyed melodies. 

Prior to the album, Jackson had been intimately connected with musicians in bands that evolved into Traffic, Family, and Spooky Tooth, although he never attained anything near the same recognition as those groups in his brief solo career. He’d been in the Hellions, the Birmingham group also including Mason, Grosvenor, and future Traffic percussionist Jim Capaldi, who made some flop singles for Piccadilly in the mid-1960s. After the Hellions broke up, Jackson played in Deep Feeling with Capaldi, Grosvenor, and future Family multi-instrumentalist Poli Palmer. Deep Feeling, unfortunately, never released anything, although an excellent early psychedelic track they recorded, “Pretty Colours,” did eventually get released on Grosvenor’s Floodgates Anthology. Jackson was an odd man out, though, when Mason and Capaldi helped form Traffic, and little was heard from him after the 1960s despite the promise of Thinking Back. 

Gordon Jackson’s only album sounds a little like a Traffic LP with a singer who isn’t in the band. The similarity is really no surprise, since Traffic men Steve Winwood, Dave Mason, Jim Capaldi, and Chris Wood all played on the record, and Mason produced. Other notables with connections to the Traffic family tree or Marmalade label also appeared, including Luther Grosvenor; Rick Grech, Jim King, and Poli Palmer of Family; and Julie Driscoll. There’s a languid, minor keyed jazz-folk-psychedelic vibe to the songs, which have a meditative, spontaneously pensive air, appealingly sung by Jackson. Touches of Indian and African music are added by occasional tabla and sitar. What keeps this from being as memorable as Traffic or some of the other better late-'60s British psychedelic acts is a certain meandering looseness to the songs that, while quite pleasant, lacks concision and focus. That was a quality also heard in the album from the same era by fellow Marmalade artist Gary Farr, Take Something With You, and while Thinking Back is better and more original than Farr’s effort, the songs are more interesting mood pieces with a yearning, mystic tone than they are outstanding compositions. At times this is like hearing psychedelic sea shanties (as on “My Ship, My Star”), such is the lilt of the tunes, though hints of blues and more playful pop-psych whimsy are heard in cuts like “Me and My Dog.” [The 2005 CD reissue on Sunbeam adds lengthy historical liner notes and five bonus tracks, including the non-LP B-side “A Day at the Cottage”; a haunting, sparse home demo of “My Ship, My Star”; single mixes of “Song for Freedom” and “Sing to Me Woman”; and a long version of “Me and My Dog.”] …. By ChrisGoesRock…..~ 

Musicians 
*Gordon Jackson - Vocals, Acoustic Guitar 
*Rob Blunt - Electric sitar, Acoustic Fingerstyle Guitar 
*Dave Mason - Electric Guitar, Slide Guitar, Bass 
*Remic Abacca - Tabla 
*Jim Capaldi - Drums, Backing Vocals 
*Jim King - Soprano Sax 
*Poli Palmer - Piano, Organ, Backing Vocals 
*Rocky Dzidzorni - Conga 
*Cnris Wood - Flute, Tenor Sax 
*Steve Winwood - Bass, Piano 
*Reg King, Julie Driscoll - Backing Vocals 
*Luther Grosvenor, Meic Stevens, Blossom Toes - Backing Vocals 
*Nicole, Karen, Cynthia and Annie - Backing Vocals 

Tracks 
1. The Journey - 4:52 
2. My Ship, My Star - 6:13 
3. Me And My Dog - 4:12 
4. Song For Freedom - 4:52 
5. Sing To Me Woman - 5:27 
6. When You Are Small - 7:16 
7. Snakes And Ladders - 5:57 
8. A Day At The Cottage (Non-album B side) - 3:34 
9. My Ship, My Star (Demo version) - 4:29 
10. Song For Freedom (Single mix) - 3:56 
11. Sing To Me Woman (Single mix) - 4:30 
12. Me And My Dog (Long v

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