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20 Jul 2017

The Electronic Hole “The Electronic Hole“ 1970 US Private Acid Psych Rock


The Electronic Hole “The Electronic Hole“ 1970 US Private Acid Psych Rock

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NrZahUX_QTc


In 1969, Phil Pearlman made a demo album for his band, A Beat Of The Earth. Only 150 copies were pressed. This album, entitled "The Electronic Hole" included a coverversion of Frank Zappa's 'Trouble Every Day'. 
The album has been (re)released on CD. 

It's unclear if the band was still called "Beat Of The Earth", or if the entire project was entitled "The Electronic Hole".......


One of the most extraordinary early recordings you’ll ever hear. Maybe the best aural document we have of the free wheeling Southern Californian culture of 1966 and 1967. This is one continuous track, broken up by the sides of the record. Non stop percussion, acoustic and electric guitar (a fuzzy surf sound), sitars, an ancient organ, and droning vocals. One of the most drugged out albums I’ve ever heard, except the bandleader (Phil Pearlman) was apparently anti-drugs! Maybe if the Velvet Underground had more of that Californian sunshine, they’d sound like this. 
A legit LP was reissued by the band itself at the same time they unearthed the archival “Our Standard Three Minute Tune”, which is very similar in sound and structure to the album proper. Neither of these have been issued legit on CD. Watch for bootlegs...............


The Electronic Hole exists in a strange netherworld between Cosmic Michael-style endearing ineptitude and strangely effective, stuttering, trance-inducing folk-rock sounds. The main problem, or charm if you want to see it that way, is that the Electronic Hole's ambition tends to outstrip their playing abilities. Drums stumble, vocals waver off key, and the rhythm guitar tends to get a little distracted. On the more conventional songs, this doesn't work out very well. Fortunately, there are some longer, droning tracks which make for a far groovier listen. 
My view on this album is that the songs under five minutes are pretty disposable, but the ones longer than that are worth a listen. "The Golden Hour Part IV" is like a distilled, sloppier "Venus in Furs" with a garage-band plunking bassline driving it along, while "Love Will Find A Way Part II" has a fuzzed-out minimalism that strikes me as a predecessor to the signature Spacemen 3 sound. "Love Will Find A Way Part III" is one of those raga rockers that tend to shoot straight for the sweet spot in my ear. Meanwhile, tracks like the opening "The Golden Hour Part I" test my patience a bit as we hear the band attempt a sunburst West Coast rock sound, yet the band can't play their instruments very well and their ability to stay in time with each other is even worse. 

Although harbouring some serious flaws, the Electronic Hole's long player has at least half of a pretty hep album for you psychedelic junkies. Hey, that's all Love's "Da Capo" can lay claim to as well. Anyway, you can start the dirty jokes about the band's name... now. ...................


Beat Of The Earth was assembled by Phil Pearlman, who had earlier released a surf/hot rod 45 Chrome Reversed Rails (shown as by Phil and The Flakes, on the Fink label). One of the earliest known electric experimental bands, The Beat Of The Earth sound very similar to their East-coast counterparts The Velvet Underground on albums (1) and (3) listed above. These two records were recorded live in the studio during the Summer of 1967 and consist of long, unstructured jams using a myriad of acoustic and electric instruments. This early incarnation of the band is the one most familiar to collectors and copies of the first album have been changing hands for hundred of dollars since the mid-eighties. The music the band produced during this period is not for everybody (compare to the long tracks on the first two Velvet Underground albums), but their debut remains an unusual and rare item of significance from the California rock scene. 
During 1968-9 the line-up of the band was in constant flux and Beat Of The Earth made no known "proper" recordings, but Pearlman continued to add to his own collection of demos using local studios in off-hours via his friendship with the engineer Joe Sidore. At the end of 1969, Pearlman assembled The Electronic Hole strictly for personal use - specifically, to draft musicians for his new band. Several names are listed on the sleeve but I believe this is actually very close to being a Phil Pearlman solo project. The album is entirely different stylistically from the earlier one in that it abandons the freeform improvisational approach in favour of 'compositions' including a wild cover of Zappa's Trouble Comin' Every Day. None of the tracks are given titles on the album which complicates singling any out for commentary, but there are real highlights and the raw, unpolished feel only serves to make it utterly magical. Pearlman plays sitar on one track to great effect, and another has the thickest wall of fuzz guitars imaginable - an effect he created by running his Fender amplifier into the amp circuit of a child's chord organ ("sounded great for about two weeks, then it blew up!"). There are few albums I known of that have such an eclectic yet appealing sound. Had the story ended here it would have been a real tragedy, as Pearlman's finest hour was yet to come. Six years later (with who knows what in between), recording commenced on the majestic Relatively Clean Rivers album with an entirely new band and musical vision. ..... D.Glazer...............


Extremely obscure 2nd Radish label album, 150 copies originally issued in 1970. "Raw, noisy, droning and completely mesmerizing album recorded by Phil Pearlman between the first Beat of the Earth album and Relatively Clean Rivers. Pearlman assembled The Electronic Hole in 1969 strictly for personal use -- to audition musicians for his new band. To do this, and to add to his own collection of demos, he used local studios in off-hours thanks to his friendship with album engineer Joe Sidore. The result is entirely different from Beat of the Earth, as it abandons a freeform improvisational approach in favor of 'compositions', including a wild cover of Frank Zappa's 'Trouble Every Day'. Pearlman plays sitar to great effect on the album, and another tracks have the thickest wall of fuzz guitars imaginable. ...............Amazing album! ......

Phil Pearlman led three short-lived groups, the Beat of the Earth (1967), The Electronic Hole (~1969-70), and the Relatively Clean Rivers (1976). The Beat of the Earth album is by far the most amazing of the three, but the lone release of The Electronic Hole is also of interest. 

While the first band's side long epics organically evolved and shifted, The Electronic Hole LP is two side long suites comprised of 7 `songs' total. 

Droning sitar, fuzzed out guitars, murky dark corners... More raw and song-oriented than the improvisations of Beat of the Earth. Some of it works better than other bits. Reference points might be the Velvet Underground, early-Zappa (covered here), and the more psychedelic moments of Jefferson Airplane & The Byrds. To their credit they defy easy categorization. Worth seeking out, this is a cut above the usual obscurities touted as lost masterworks. But don't miss Beat of the Earth.....by 410..........


Philip Gadahn, born Philip Pearlman, is an American musician from western Riverside County, California. He is best known as the artist behind several psych-folk happenings in the 60s & early 70s. He has attracted more mainstream attention in recent years because of his son, Adam Yahiye Gadahn, a convert to radical Islam & a suspected al Qaeda operative. Pearlman attended the University of California at Irvine. Phil is the son of a Jewish father & Protestant mother. Pearlman himself was raised agnostic. He converted to Christianity in the early 70s, just prior to recording the underground classic Relatively Clean Rivers. After conversion he changed his last name to ‘Gadahn’ as a tribute to the Bible’s Gideon.

The earliest known release from Phil is a surf/hot rod 45 with some unusual touches from the less-than-legendary Phil & the Flakes. Listed as #23 on the Top 40 Surf Music Vocals by Montjurich Surfboards.
After the Flakes flaked, Phil hooked up with other like-minded SoCal BoHo musicians & recorded a free spirited project called The Beat of the Earth.
Outtakes from the 1967 The Beat of the Earth recording session.
The Electronic Hole is a band put together after BOTE. Pearlman assembled The Electronic Hole in 1969 strictly for personal use, to serve as auditions for musicians for a new band. To help accomplish this & also to add to his own collection of demos, he used local studios in off-hours thanks to his friendship with album engineer Joe Sidore. The fact that Phil did a lot of his own recording helped create the rather unique sound tone of The Electronic Hole. One of the first things is the strange fuzz & noisy power combined with psychedelic riffing complexity. The next thing may be that it only has two song titles…"The Golden Hill" & "Love Will Find A Way" which are then divided into numerous parts. The whole noise usage & street-wise vocals may remind of The Velvet Underground. Pearlman's voice has a sound similar to John Cale's & The Electronic Hole has been called “a West Coast Velvets.
This album contains extremely rare songs from an extremely rare band. Original heavy psych sound that drones you into mind wandering. 
Phil assembled his band in the early 70s & eventually recorded this magnificent rural rock album in 1975. The Relatively Clean Rivers album stands with the very best albums of the era, possessing a purely American sound. Amazingly well produced compared to previous Pearlman releases, it is the very antithesis of his earlier material which was for the most part garage (although they in truth project a certain tangible level of sophistication). No measurable degree of time or expense was spared in the creation of the Relatively Clean Rivers album, which took over a year to assemble. It is one of the most flawless snapshots of the California seventies underground scene you will ever hear.

Some feel this album is the second coming, with strong apocalyptic acid visions & wonderful musicianship. Others feel that it’s a solid rural rock record with strands of late period psychedelia.Whichever, it is worth a good listen.........

 Reissue of the extremely obscure 2nd Radish label album, originally issued in 1970. Raw, noisy, droning and completely mesmerizing album recorded by Phil Pearlman between the first Beat of the Earth album and Relatively Clean Rivers. Pearlman assembled The Electronic Hole in 1969 strictly for personal use -- to audition musicians for his new band. To do this, and to add to his own collection of demos, he used local studios in off-hours thanks to his friendship with album engineer Joe Sidore. The result is entirely different from Beat of the Earth, as it abandons a freeform improvisational appr.............................
As the story goes, Phil Pearlman, who had previously released the self-titled Beat of the Earth in 1967, was looking to recruit musicians for his next project, so he recorded a full album of demos for private use to give future potential participants an idea of the direction he was going in, because that's what everyone does, right? There is debate whether this is officially a Beat of the Earth album, or whether it's just called The Electronic Hole. What isn't up for debate however, is this is one fantastic album. Yes, the songs have a raw, somewhat unfinished demo quality to them, but if these are raw demos, I can only imagine how amazing the final result would have been, as the songs are high quality as they are. The individual songs are untitled, making it difficult to talk about specific tracks. Side one contains five tracks and is known only as "The Golden Hour" (though some online sources call it "The Golden Hill"). Every song is killer, containing highly consistent, extremely trippy and mesmerizing psychedelic garage rock with Pearlman's distinctive acoustic and electric guitar, sitar, harmonica and appealing vocals. The lyrics are spiritual and surreal, such as this on track two:

"Land of Odin, land of God,
everybody feels the prod,
of the will and the way,
and you slowly reach on through the day.

Gates of Eden, gates of time,
gates of never-ending rhyme.
Yes I will, yes I will,
yes I will find the golden hill."

Side two, called "Love Will Find a Way," is just two tracks. The first one is a 7-minute hypnotic fuzzy cover of "Trouble Every Day" by The Mothers of Invention. Track two is a long, rough track that could have been improved upon with a better mix, as the excellent fuzzy electric guitar is a bit buried, but it's still great, sounding like a decent quality audience recording of a late 60's Velvet Underground concert................................

Tracklist

A The Golden Hill
B Love Will Find A Way

Discography

the beat of the earth: the beat of the earth
(1967, lp, usa, radish as 001) - 500 copies

the beat of the earth: the electronic hole
(1969, lp-demo, usa, radish as 002) - demo use only, 150 copies - incl. 'trouble every day' (frank zappa)

the beat of the earth: our standard three minute tune
(19??, lp, usa, radish as 0001½) - 500 copies

Watch......

The Beat of the Earth "The Beat Of The Earth" 1967 US Private Psych Rock



johnkatsmc5, welcome music..