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Tuesday, 5 September 2017

Flower Travellin’ Band ‎ “Anywhere” 1970 Japan Psych Rock debut album (Top 50 Japan Rock Albums by Julian Cope) ~





.'Anywhere' is the debut album by Japanese Rock group 'Flower Travellin' Band' released in 1970 by Polydor Records and produced by Yuya Uchida.
The only original composition that is an original band one on here is "Anywhere" which is short a soulful blues harp piece that appears both on the beginning and the end, while it's not quite clear what the lyrics are actually saying as with other parts of the album it still shows the great performance with powerful amount of lung capacity matched with chops and bold playing.
The slightly progressive psychedelic element is quite potent and gracefully astute with a band picking up on everything so well and providing lengthy psych jam tracks.
Four long cover versions make the material 'Louisiana Blues' by 'Muddy Waters', 'Black Sabbath' by 'Black Sabbath', 'House Of The Rising Sun' and '21st Century Schizoid Man' by 'King Crimson'.
The album cover (Easy Rider-style), yet again features a daring and provocative cover with full-blown bravado especially during the time they did it and in their own more conservative country Japan, setting it as an iconic memorable cover of an album that is actually pretty promising..



First album from the legendary Japanese rockers fronted by Yuya Utchida. Although an album consisting mainly of cover versions, Anywhere still exhibited many of the musical traits that were to come to the fore on the band’s next release, the classic Satori, an album of original material delivered with panache by the increasingly confident Uchida. An album made memorable by its risque cover as well as its ground-breaking approach to Western rock music... 



Best known for its iconic, quite frankly hilarious cover art -- featuring the four bandmembers riding three motorcycles, Easy Rider-style, only buck naked (gulp!) -- the Flower Travellin' Band's 1970 debut album, Anywhere, unfortunately isn't as original where the actual music is concerned. That's because, with the exception of its minute-long, book-ending solo harmonica workouts, Anywhere was a covers album! And the second of its kind, technically speaking, following 1969's Challenge, which was recorded by the then simply named the Flowers with two different singers tackling Western rock and pop hits of the day by Janis Joplin, Cream, Hendrix, and the Jefferson Airplane. Come time for Anywhere, new singer Akira "Joe" Yamanaka had joined guitarist Hideki Ishima, bassist Jun Kowzuk, and drummer Joji "George" Wada, in the newly renamed Flower Travellin' Band, and though they hadn't yet found time to come up with any original material, their often radical reworkings of the songs they covered almost qualified them as such. This is especially true of their 15-minute improvisation on Muddy Waters' "Louisiana Blues," which they render virtually unrecognizable while introducing numerous themes of the band' own devising; and, to a lesser degree, their extended jam on King Crimson's "21st Century Schizoid Man," which breaks off into quite the freak-out halfway through. And, while not as engaging from a creativity standpoint, the band's relatively straightforward take on Black Sabbath's eponymous tune (surely the first time anyone covered the Sabs on record) comes off uniquely idiosyncratic enough, as does their mostly clumsy stab at the enduring folk ballad "House of the Rising Sun," which unfortunately falls apart due to Ishima's exaggerated and often off-pitch octave leaps, and distractingly accented pronunciations ("...rouse of the lising sun," etc.). In sum, a curious listening experience to say the least. But those familiar with the group's subsequent masterpiece, Satori, will recognize all of these elements as building blocks for that album's unique mixture of progressive daring, psychedelic eccentricity, and muscular, heavy rock austerity. Those who haven't heard Satori, on the other hand, will see little point in bothering with Anywhere's covers, no matter how interesting...unless they find it impossible to resist with that legendary cover photo, that is..... by Eduardo Rivadavia ...... 



Like many other debuts from the era's hard rock groups, Flower Travellin’ Band’s Anywhere came out in 1970 boasting more musicianship than originality. But the group's cover songs flourished with innovative adaptations, starting with an awe-inspired psychedelic freakout rendering of Muddy Waters’ “Louisiana Blues” that jams out for nearly 16 minutes. The Tokyo-based quartet even elongated Black Sabbath’s namesake tune an extra three minutes, replete with singer Akira “Joe” Yamanaka approximating a young Ozzy Osborne’s throaty inflections (right down to his wailing “Ooh noo!”). A Wishbone Ash–esque cover of the traditional tune “House of the Rising Sun” proved that there was much more to Flower Travellin’ Band than cranked tube amps and mind-melting acid-rock. A sprawling take on King Crimson's "21st Century Schizoid Man" plays with such crazed changes and unpredictable arrangements that it’s easy to understand the kind of minds that thought the album cover photo might be a good idea. Two bluesy harmonica-honking instrumental originals bookend Anywhere..

Originally envisioned as a female-fronted Japanese heavy rock cover act called the Flowers by entertainer and "entrepreneur" Yuya Uchida, the Flower Travellin' Band would eventually chart their own course, becoming an underground influence on later metal acts, and counting one Julian Cope as a disciple. As the Flowers, (original) vocalist Remi Aso, guitarist Hideki Ishima, bassist Jun Kowzuki, and drummer Joji Wada released their debut, Challenge, in 1969. Consisting entirely of cover versions of Western pop/rock songs, the album got attention not necessarily from the music, but from the fact that the entire band was photographed in the nude on the cover.
Uchida and Aso left after the first album, leaving the band to reorganize with new vocalist Joe Yamanaka, and allowing it to explore more original and experimental avenues. Their first album as the Flower Travellin' Band, Anywhere, was released in 1970. The album featured five covers, including Muddy Waters' "Louisiana Blues" and Black Sabbath's "Black Sabbath." Again, the bandmembers appeared nude on the cover; the difference this time was that they were on motorcycles.
Their first wholly "original"-based full-length, Satori, was released in 1971. Made in Japan was released in 1972, and a double live and studio set, Make Up, came out in 1973, before the band would go on a hiatus lasting over three decades. By the end of this phase of their career, the Flower Travellin' Band were opening for prominent acts such as Emerson, Lake & Palmer. Recordings made before the band issued Anywhere would be released in the mid-'70s under the title Kirikyogen, and 1995 would see a bootleg release of early material under the title From Pussies to Death in 10,000 Years of Freakout.
In 2007 the Flower Travellin' Band reunited -- without the involvement of Yuya Uchida and with the addition of keyboardist Nobuhiko Shinohara -- and released the album We Are Here the following year. However, in March 2010 the group ceased its activities upon the announcement that vocalist Joe Yamanaka had been diagnosed with lung cancer. Yamanaka died from the disease on August 7, 2011; he was 64 years old. ~ Christopher True

The Flower Travellin' Band is mostly famous these days for being a memorable psychedelic Japanese rock band that DOES in fact, rock hard. For someone like me -someone who's always been incredibly curious what the Japanese musicians were doing back in the 70's- an album like Anywhere and Satori is exactly what I wanted to play.
While Satori is the album you need to hear the most, Anywhere is notable for featuring some really outrageous cover songs. At least, back in the day this album was considered extremely outrageous by certain underground crowds, I'd imagine. Not sure if Americans or the British were familiar with this band, though.
Their cover of the song "Black Sabbath" by the band Black Sabbath is the one song that catches my attention the most. Now it's not necessarily an improvement over the Sabbath version (because let's face it, the Sabbath version sounds absolutely *amazing* with that thick as heck guitar tone courtesy of Tony Iommi).
I'm just amazed there were actually bands around back in the day that were covering classic Sabbath material. We're talking about a cover song literally *months* after the Sabbath album was released (the debut). Amazing!
Like I say above ('cuz I won't steer you wrong, folks) Satori is the album you need to hear first. This is just something else you can experience after you've done memorized Satori....ByBryan....


A whole gang of naked Japanese men riding motorbikes and playing cover versions in 1970 – irresistible! I bought a CD of this album in New York at Kim’s in St Marks about 15 years ago and have been a fan ever since. The band was the brainchild of percussionist, singer, producer, actor, Yuya Uchida who became friends with John Lennon after opening for The Beatles at the Budokan in Tokyo and whilst visiting England, got turned onto the sounds of the day. He wondered how to bring this music to his own culture and formed the band The Flowers playing cover versions of Big Brother And The Holding Company, Jefferson Airplane, Cream and Jimi Hendrix. (The Anywhere album cover art followed the theme of Yuya Uchida & The Flowers album, Challenge! 1968, by having cover versions and nudity).

When two key members left, he broke the band up and formed Flower Travellin’ Band as an exploration of these contemporary sounds in the role of producer, engaging Joe Yamanaka to sing, and the rhythm section of Joji “George” Wada on drums (also from The Flowers), Jun Kobayashi on bass and Hideki Ishima on guitar. (I’m not sure if Nobuhiko Shinohara who played keyboards with the band later is on this record). This band had a darker sound as the seventies arrived, covering Muddy Waters, Black Sabbath (the song) and King Crimson’s 21st Century Schizoid Man. The album also included a version Of House Of The Rising Sun.
After a short intro, the band launches into a 16 minute version of Muddy Waters’ Louisiana Blues. It’s hard to imagine a naked, Japanese, pyschedelic, progressive, heavy metal band from 1970 seducing you with their cover versions, but believe it or not they do. I can’t quite put my finger on why it is so good, except it has an authenticity, a freaky realness about it and it captures the Japanese counter-culture of the sixties, breaking taboos with nudity, long hair, loud electric guitars and Western influence. It must have been radical by Japanese standards of the day.
But it’s the interpretation that I love, and after all it wasn’t exclusive to the Japanese to cover Muddy Waters’ or other old blues songs. Cream, Fleetwood Mac, Led Zeppelin were doing the same. The Flower Travellin’ Band’s versions were as connected as any Western bands interpretations were. It wasn’t that unusual in the sixties for songwriters to record other people’s songs, Dylan did it, The Beatles did it and lots of talented songwriters such as Tim Buckley, Tom Rush, Tim Hardin and many more did the same. (Too many bands have recorded average albums of their own songs because they wrote them).
Listening to this album is tuning into an era and if freaky jams isn’t your bag then this isn’t for you. But if a journey into the late sixties and the revolution that was happening in music as seen through Japanese eyes appeals to you, then this is a fascinating look at how the cool kids in Tokyo were interpreting the Western style. Great guitar sounds and a real connection to the essence of the originals, the singing too captures the spirit of the times, sadly singer Joe Yamanaka died in 2011 of lung cancer. After this album the band went onto make the landmark album Satori that they wrote themselves – but that’s for another day.......


We are in 1969. Yuya Utchida, Japanese rocker with stellar ambitions, is surfing on the psychedelic wave with his band The Flowers, six lighted stage beasts that attract the crowds without offering anything new. However all is not doomed to stagnate as well, Utchida saw the future of his group and he is radiant. Reversal of fortune; the singer Remi Aso and the guitarist Katsuhiko Kobayashi relocate to the States and leave the group dismembered, at bay. Mint, Utchida retired for several months to meditate on his sad situation. When he comes back, it is decided to make a difference for good: he turns everyone, including himself and with the exception of the drummer. Yuya Utchida & The Flowers is no longer, Utchida himself no longer plays, he becomes a manager full of what will be an entirely new entity, purified and destined to reach the Moon to join Princess Kaguya. But I digress ... The group must first create new members. Hideki Ishima, guitarist and Jun Kobayashi, bassist, are brought to join the remaining drummer George Wada. The Flowers are now a trio who begins to repeat in jam-sessions, to test their group alchemy. This will only be reached when Yuya Utchida falls in love (artistically speaking) with Joe Yamanaka. Singer with the gigantic afro, Joe is from the moribund scene of the Group Sounds; pseudo-rock whose stars are flattered by the record companies as real divas. The lucky bugger was close to finishing like the sadly made-up corpses of his scene before Utchida put his hand on him and invited him to repeat with his new band. The trio becomes a quartet, and to celebrate the occasion Yuya Utchida renames her group. The Flower Travellin 'Band is finally born.
Its formula is simple: a powerful rhythmic seating that holds the walls while a virtuoso guitarist leads the dance in duet with a charismatic singer who plays castrats at the Robert Plant or Ozzy Osbourne. The Flower Travellin Band has everything to walk, it lacks only inspiration. But let's not go too fast. Utchida is a conscientious man; no question of risking failure, as long as the group does not handle its formula to perfection, it will not get wet to propose personal compositions. So it left again for an album of covers: Anywhere.
The iconic clutch is also iconic, even if it is modeled on the previous one: the four group guys posing naked on motorcycles thrown at full speed (in theory, their long hair does not float masses in the photo). This time only, the group has taken care of its recoveries. 6 pieces on the counter, including a very short intro / conclusion. If the tracklist actually appears reduced the tracks do not fall below the 7 minute mark. "Louisiana Blues", the jam of the group, besides 15; a quarter of an hour that allows the Flower Travellin Band to show all its nascent alchemy on the background of a blues grid of Muddy Waters re-echoed. Let us look at the other three times, because that's where it all goes, and we begin to see the full potential of the group. It is on Black Sabbath that the process evoked earlier unfolds in all its splendor: the Flower Travellin Band seize a slow and heavy piece and take care to make it even slower, even heavier, and especially much more refined. From the heavy-metal nascent of the English Sabbath, the Japanese of the Flowers give birth to a species of doom before the hour. Perhaps by mistake, it is always that these are finally precursors that we hoped to see happen ... After this deluge pre-doom, the fine weather. "House of the Rising Sun" begins with a long introduction to the dry guitar, in a very bucolic atmosphere, small birds singing (not really, inserts of sparrows will prove my sayings). When Joe engages in singing, it is a very special blues that is put in place. Not really a blues actually ... Do you figure rather a guitar pulling out melancholic folk arpeggios on some discrete cymbals while Joe chants the text more than it applies to sing it. "21st Century Schizoid Man", if it undergoes the same treatment as "Black Sabbath", is less relevant when it comes to duplicating King Crimson's jazz-rock flights; the battery is more stingy and the bass well too monolithic and put forward in the mix.
Anywhere is certainly not the best production of the Flower Travellin Band, far from it, but this disc represents the most decisive stage of their journey. The one that showed they were able to be more than just copycats in the wind. The consecration is not far; after initiating the country to psychedelic rock with Challenge, Yuya Utchida was soon to create an eminently heavy Japanese rock. But a final step is necessary before entering the pantheon; an escapade annex to the country of the prog....by...X_Wazoo ..


A true cult band of the early 1970s, the Flower Travellin' Band (initially called the Flowers) was started in 1969 by Yuya Uchida, who went on to become a major figure on the Japanese music scene. In the months leading up to his starting the band, Uchida had spent time in London visiting a good friend named John Lennon (who he had met during the Beatles Asian tour in 1966). During his stay in London he met a huge array of artists, including Cream and Jimi Hendrix, and returned home with the idea of bringing a similar sound to Japan. The band soon caused a stir in the media, not so much for their music (which at this early stage was made up mostly of covers), but for their shocking sleeve art, which in the case of this LP featured the naked band members riding low-rider motorcycles! Anywhere opens with a 52 second original intro followed by a freaked-out 15 min version of Muddy Water's "Louisiana Blues", followed by the Sabs "Black Sabbath" (probably the first cover of that song ever to appear on LP), "House of the Rising Sun" and King Crimson's "21st Century Schizoid Man", and then an original outro. It was not until their next album however, that Uchida would truly come into his own, penning his first LP of all original material (1971's Satori) and a true classic of the era... 



Thirty-eight years ago this month, the members of the Flower Travellin’ Band moved from Tokyo to Toronto, poised to take on the world. A little over a year later, they returned to Japan, broke and somewhat disillusioned. But from the Land of the Rising Sun to the land of the ice and snow, rock ‘n’ roll dreams die hard, and now, FTB have returned to take care of some long-unfinished business.
With their first Toronto gig since 1972 rapidly approaching, four of the five band members sit in a hotel lobby at Pearson Airport, eagerly awaiting news of singer Joe Yamanaka, who has been temporarily stranded in Tokyo due to a passport screw-up. They could go on for hours about how visas have been the bane of their existence, but they’re just as eager to reminisce about their heyday, when they hung out in Yonge Street clubs and rubbed shoulders with the likes of Bob Seger and The Guess Who. Now in their early 60s, they all look fighting fit, and as guitarist Hideki Ishima is keen to note, they’re “still crazy.”
Back in the day, FTB were crazy indeed: the cover of their first album, Anywhere, depicted the long-haired rockers riding motorcycles naked on a cold April morning. Their music was harder and more intense than anything Japan had ever heard, and on stage, they played with energy and abandon – one vintage video on YouTube shows the band working a deliriously enthusiastic crowd in Kyoto as a loincloth-sporting Yamanaka whips them up (and dodges items of their clothing) from astride a large fibreglass elephant.
When FTB met the band Lighthouse at Osaka’s Expo ’70, they were captivated by the jazz-influenced Canadian rockers’ enthusiastic description of Toronto. FTB recorded their second album, the mind-warpingly bruising Satori, in two days, and hopped a plane across the Pacific to join their new friends shortly thereafter.
The single “Satori, Part 2” charted in Toronto, where audiences proved, as bassist Jun Kobayashi notes, “more excitable” than back home. The band began to find fans in unexpected places: Ishima recalls a policeman who pulled them over and body-searched them one night for looking “suspicious,” but ended up asking, “Are you guys Flower Travellin’ Band?” Instead of being handcuffed, they got a lift back to their apartments.
In Trudeau’s multicultural Canada, FTB’s heritage became a selling point; they even called an album they recorded in Toronto Made in Japan. They landed opening-act gigs for Lighthouse and Emerson, Lake & Palmer at Ontario Place and Stanley Park Stadium on King Street, but despite their best efforts, their career stalled because they couldn’t obtain the visas they needed to tour the U.S.
Living in penury took its toll: drummer George Wada was hospitalized for three months with tuberculosis. He had contracted the disease in Japan, he says, but he developed its symptoms in Toronto because “all the stress and no food made me weak.”
Bowed but unbroken, FTB returned to Japan in 1972, only to find that while they were away, as Kobayashi recalls, “the whole country went [over] to folk music.” Still, they soldiered on – literally. At one concert, they were attacked by a group of helmet-wearing, spear-carrying students protesting the admission charge. The band members (especially Yamanaka, a former boxer) fought them into submission and kept playing.
FTB added keyboardist Nobuhiko Shinohara to “widen the sound” and were signed up to open for The Rolling Stones on a Japanese tour. Alas, Mick Jagger’s own visa issues scuppered what could have been their big break, and the band parted ways soon after.
And yet, over the decades their profile has increased, largely due to Satori, which was hailed as an undiscovered classic of proto-heavy metal and stoner rock. In 2002, director Takashi Miike used it to soundtrack much of his ultraviolent Yakuza movie, Deadly Outlaw Rekka. Singer and music historian Julian Cope put the record at the top of his list of best 1960s and ‘70s Japanese albums in his 2007 book Japrocksampler, which featured Anywhere’s infamous naked-motorcycle photo on the cover.
Most importantly, the cult success of Japanese progressive, psychedelic and experimental bands such as Boris, Acid Mothers Temple, and The Boredoms has prompted fans around the world to explore the work of their antecedents, and FTB have developed a following among people who never had the chance to see them play.
The band remain unfamiliar with the work of these younger acts, and the term “stoner rock” simply makes them laugh. Nonetheless, they knew from the growing number of mentions of their name on the internet that it was a propitious time for a reunion. Only Kobayashi needed to be coaxed: he hadn’t picked up a bass in nearly 35 years and was living in Toronto, designing watches and accessories.
Eventually, Ishima’s philosophy convinced him. “I feel like I want to keep trying, even though I may fail,” says the guitarist. And even though the band’s reunion album, We Are Here, feels somewhat tentative, it still showcases the band members’ personalities: Wada’s pummelling drums, Kobayashi’s slinky bass, Shinohara’s expansive, jazz-influenced keys, Yamanaka’s keening vocals, and Ishima’s winding licks – now delivered on a “sitarla,” a guitar-sitar hybrid which he helped to invent.
On stage, they’ve truly come back into their own, as fiery footage from their recent Japanese reunion tour suggests. Says Kobayashi, new fans were “excited” by the sight of “old guys like us, still performing this way.”
Alas, American fans still have to cross the border for their FTB fix: Yamanaka’s passport problem means a planned concert in New York City has been scrapped. But this Monday, at Toronto’s Revival, the dreadlocked singer will join his “crazy” bandmates on stage.
And even though this time they’re under no illusions that they’ll conquer the world – “We’re too old!” laughs Kobayashi – their very presence is an antidote to the over-produced, Nickelback-led bilge that continues to pile up on Canadian rock radio, and to Japan’s preternaturally perfect pop.
“We are against that,” says Kobayashi. “That’s ridiculous. We want to make more mistakes.”
— Originally published in The National Post, Dec. 12 2008.......












Line-up / Musicians 

- Akira "Joe" Yamanaka / Vocals 
- Joji "George" Wada / Drums 
- Kuni Kawachi / Keyboard 
- Jun Kowzuki / Bass 
- Hideki Ishima / Guitar 



Tracklist 

A1 Anywhere 0:52 
A2 Louisiana Blues 
A3 Black Sabbath 
B1 House Of The Rising Sun 7:41 
B2 Twenty-First Century Schizoid Man 
B3 Anywhere 0:57 


Discography: 

ANYWHERE (Atlantic, 1970) 
Kuni Kawachi and Flower Travellin' Band - KIRIKYOGEN (Atlantic, 1970) 
SATORI (Atlantic, 1971) 
MADE IN JAPAN (Atlantic, 1972) 
MAKE UP (Atlantic, 1973) 
FROM PUSSIES TO DEATH IN 10,000 YEARS OF FREAKOUT (recorded '69-'70) (1995) 






Discography 

Yuya Uchida & the Flowers

Studio albums 

Challenge! (1969) – Debut album. 

Singles 

“Last Chance” b/w “Flower Boy” (1969) – Single.
“Flower Boy” b/w “Last Chance” (1969) – Single.
“Fantastic Girl” b/w “Yogiri no Trumpet” (1969) – Single. 

Appearances 

Opera from the Works of Tadanori Yokoo (1969) – Multimedia compilation by Toshi Ichiyanagi and featuring various artists.
Rock 'n’ Roll Jam '70 (1970) – Live album featuring various artists. The Flowers perform “All Is Loneliness”, “Piece of My Heart”, “You Shook Me” and “Kozmic Blues”

Flower Travellin’ Band 

Studio albums 

Anywhere (1970) – First Flower Travellin’ Band album.
Satori (1971) – First original studio album.
Made in Japan (1972) – Second original studio album.
Make Up (1973) – Double album, consisting of both live and studio recordings. Featuring keyboardist Nobuhiko Shinohara.
We Are Here (2008) – First album after reuniting without Yuya Uchida.


Singles 

“Crash” b/w “Dhoop” (1970) – Single with trumpeter Terumasa Hino and the first recording credited to the Flower Travellin’ Band.
“Map” b/w “Machine Gun Kelly” (1971) – Split single with American band Jo Mama.
“Satori Pt. 1” (1971) – Canada-only single.

Compilations 

Satori (1971) – Canada-only compilation album.
The Times (1975) – A best-of album. 

Videos 

Resurrection (2008) – DVD. 

Others 

Kirikyogen (1970) – Album by Kuni Kawachi, sometimes co-credited to the Flower Travellin’ Band although only Yamanaka and Ishima took part. 





(Top 50 Japan Rock Albums by Julian Cope) 

full list here, all albums with informations,photos & mp3`s




Happenings Four +1 "The Long Trip" 1971 Japan Psych Rock
Rashomon (Kuni Kawachi The Happenings Four) “Our Constitutional Rights” 1971  羅生門 ‎– 日本国憲法 平和 自由 愛 Japan Psych
The Happenings Four "Magical Happenings Tour" 1968 Japan Psych Pop Rock,Beat,Baroque Pop  second album  
The Happenings Four ‎ アウトサイダ  "の世界   "Outsider No Sekai - World Of The Outsiders"1970 Japan Psych Pop Rock third album
Kuni Kawachi and His Group “Love Suki Daikirai"1972 僕の声が聞こえるかい/クニ・河内の世界 (Happenings Four,Flower Travellin’ Band) Japan Psych Pop Rock
Kuni Kawachi & Flower Travellin’ Band “Kirikyōgen” 1970 Japan Heavy Psych


Flower Travellin’ Band “Made In Japan” 1972 Japan Psych Rock (Top 50 Japan Rock Albums by Julian Cope)
Flower Travellin’ Band “We Are Here” 2008 Japan Prog Rock
Flower Travellin Band “Satori” 1971 Japan Psychedelic masterpiece  (100 greatest Japanese albums Rolling Stone) (Top 50 Japan Rock Albums by  Julian Cope)
Yuya Uchida & The Flowers (Flower Travellin’ Band,) “Challenge!” 1969 Japan Psych Rock
Flower Travellin' Band "From Pussies To Death In 10.000 Years Of Freakout 1969-1970" 1997 Japan Psych Rock (bootleg)
Flower Travellin' Band ‎"Music Composed Mainly By Humans" (Bootleg) recorded in 1970 and released in 2002 Japan Psych Rock
Hideki Ishima ‎ “One Day"1971 Japan Prog Psych (ex- Flower Travellin ‘Band) man solo album
The Beavers  ザ・ビーバーズ  "Viva! Beavers!"  1968 Japan Psych,Garage Rock (Hideki Ishima-Flower Travellin’ Band & Ken Narita)
Band Aide “Uchuu Junkan” 1978 Japan Space Prog Rock  (with Nobuhiko Shinohara  ex-Flower Travellin’ Band)
Kuni Kawachi  クニ河内   "Utae Nakunaru Maeni"  歌えなくなる前に 1972  Japan Psych Rock first solo Lp
Joe Yamanaka & Flower Travellin Band "Times* 1975 Japan Psych Blues Rock LP Compilation
Joe Yamanaka (Flower Travellin Band - Kuni Kawachi And His Group )"Reggae Vibration II (My Reggae Music)" 1983 Japan Reggae (feat Tsutomu Ogawa by Too Much)
Joe Yamanaka “Live at Nippon Budokan” 1978 Japan Psych Blues Rock ((Flower Travellin Band - Kuni Kawachi And His Group )
Joe Yamanaka (Flower Travellin Band) "Joe" 1974 Japan Psych,Pop Rock,Soft Rock,Soul-excellent first solo album (feat Nobuhiko Shinohara,Takeru Muraoka,Kuni Kawachi...etc...)
    Joe Yamanaka (Flower Travellin Band - Kuni Kawachi And His Group )"Reggae Vibration II (My Reggae Music)" 1983 Japan Reggae (feat Tsutomu Ogawa by Too Much)
    Joe Yamanaka (Flower Travellin Band) ジョー山中  ‎"To The New World" 1977 Japan Psych Funk Rock  second solo album

    Yuya Uchida 内田 裕也 ‎“A Dog Runs ア・ドッグ・ランズ” 1978  Japan Psych Rock,Rock n Roll  (special guest Shinki Chen)  (The Flowers,Yuya Uchida & 1815 Super Rock 'N' Roll Band, Yuya Uchida & 183 Family Band,Flower Travellin' Band,The Tigers)



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    Japan Underground,Prog,Psych,Jazz,Blues,Folk Rock Vol 1-50 with full albums  playlist


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    Jimi at Monterey Pop Festival 1967

    Jimi at Monterey Pop Festival 1967

    Psychedelicsex kicks

    Psychedelicsex kicks
    this trip is for real!

    Nico with Velvet

    Nico with Velvet

    Lemmy

    Lemmy

    Jimi Hendrix Experience

    Jimi Hendrix Experience

    DO IT! : Scenarios of the Revolution by Jerry Rubin (1970)

    DO IT! : Scenarios of the Revolution by Jerry Rubin (1970)

    Ian Curtis of Joy Division

    Ian Curtis of Joy Division

    Punks not Dead

    Punks not Dead

    Ginger Baker

    Ginger Baker

    Country Joe & the Fish Woodstock 1969

    Country Joe & the Fish Woodstock 1969

    Sid Vicious

    Sid Vicious

    Hippie

    Hippie

    Bob Marley

    Bob Marley

    Jimmy Page

    Jimmy Page

    John Lennon

    John Lennon

    Jimi Hendrix performing “Purple Haze” at Woodstock Festival, 1969.

    Jimi Hendrix performing “Purple Haze” at Woodstock Festival, 1969.

    John Lord

    John Lord

    Pop Art

    Pop Art

    Bob Dylan

    Bob Dylan

    Pink Floyd

    Pink Floyd

    Mountain Woodstock 1969

    Mountain Woodstock  1969

    The Velvet Underground

    The Velvet Underground

    The Trip

    The Trip

    Rock n' Roll

    Rock n' Roll

    Led Zeppelin

    Led Zeppelin

    Pink Floyd

    Pink Floyd

    Mike Bloomfield - Monterey 1967

    Mike Bloomfield - Monterey 1967

    The Beatles Abbey Road

    The Beatles Abbey Road

    Janis Joplin Festival Express

    Janis Joplin   Festival Express

    Arriving at Woodstock, 1969

    Arriving at Woodstock, 1969

    Pink Floyd

    Pink Floyd

    Velvet Underground & Nico Verve Records V-5008 1967

    Velvet Underground & Nico Verve Records V-5008 1967

    Pompeii 1972

    Pompeii 1972

    Captain Beefheart

    Captain Beefheart

    Acid Test

    Acid Test

    Acid Test

    Acid Test

    Jimi Hendrix Woodstock 1969

    Jimi Hendrix Woodstock 1969

    Grateful Dead

    Grateful Dead