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Saturday, 25 February 2017

The Lijadu Sisters “Danger” 1976 Nigeria Afrobeat,Afro Funk,Beat,Soul













The Lijadu Sisters “Danger” 1976 Nigeria Afrobeat,Afro Funk,Beat,Soul
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Lovely album from 1976 by the nigerian twins Taiwo and Kehinde Lijadu. Groovy afrobeat with arrangements from Biddy Wright. …………. 

the lijadu sisters were the most successful female group in nigeria in the 1970s, whose influences ranged from female soul singers such as aretha franklin, the pointer sisters & miriam makeba to the afro-beat of fela anikulapo kuti as well as the juju music of ik dairo & the highlife of victor olaiya. this album brings together the best of the identical twins’ previously impossible to find tracks from the 4 albums recorded for the afrodisia label in nigeria - ‘danger’ (1976), ‘mother africa’ (1977), ‘sunshine’ (1978) & ‘horizon unlimited’ (1979). …. 


Afro-Beat fans might want to check this one out: The Lijadu Sisters were practically the only female stars of the Nigerian 1970’s pop scene… Sisters Kenhinde and Taiwo Lijadu were relatives of the legendary Fela Kuti, performing for several years behind the scenes as session vocalists before recording their own first single in the late 1960s. They later toured with prog-rock drummer Ginger Baker during his early 1970s foray into African music. The Lijadus released four albums in the 1970s, all produced by and featuring the music of multi-instrumentalist Biddy Wright, whose distinctive funk-meets-psychedelic guitar work gives an unusual edge to this debut album. The sisters also have fabulous voices and gorgeous harmonies, particularly on the opening tracks (the album’s second half is a bit ragged, but the opening track, “Danger” is awesome…) A genuine gem from the classic Afro-Beat scene. This disc is the first of four straight-up reissues of their music, and is definitely worth tracking down. (DJ Joe Sixpack, Slipcue Guide To World Music)…………. 

Lijadu Sisters didn’t produce as much material as Fela Kuti, Nigeria’s ruling musical monarch during the ‘70s, but their groove-laden Afro-beat was just as hard-hitting – and, on their 1976 debut Danger, even more interesting to listeners outside of Africa. The steely, clattering beats and deep, nimble bass are close to Fela trademarks, but the title track here has compelling work from organist Johny Wood and an extended solo on distorted guitar from Biddy Wright. Although most of the songs are extended groove workouts, Lijadu Sisters also vary the tempo, slipping into a midtempo groove for the wailing “Amebo.” A worthy companion to Nigeria’s musical masterpieces of the '70s…..by John Bush………….. 

The Lijadu Sisters debut album, Danger (originally released in 1976), is as funky and mellifluous as it gets, the twins gorgeous harmonies underpinned by a solid Afro-rock beat and framed by Biddy Wright’s funky organ and guitar work. Danger has a vibe of uplifting positivity which would be a feature of all four of the Lijadu Sisters albums. Lyrically, most of the songs address social and political issues, sometimes directly, sometimes through metaphor and allusion. 

Twins Taiwo and Kehinde were born in Jos, in northern Nigeria, on October 22, 1948. They enjoyed singing from an early age, and remember with special fondness discs by Aretha Franklin, Ray Charles and, Fela Kuti (their second cousin!). 'All our records include songs with deep messages,’ says Kehinde. 'Artists should be the voice of the world. Not just of their own people, but of the wider world, for a problem which faces one, faces all.’ 

Through their career, the sisters met the British drummer Ginger Baker (Cream, Blind Faith, Airplane), who in the first half of the 1070s was a frequent visitor to Nigeria. In 1972, the Lijadu Sisters performed with Baker’s band at the cultural festival accompanying the Munich Olympics in Germany. 

Another fortuitous encounter was with the multi-instrumentalist Biddy Wright. Wright co-arranged and played on all four of the classic 1970s Lijadu Sisters albums, which are now being re-released by Knitting Factory Records Danger (1976), Mother Africa (1977), Sunshine (1978) and Horizon Unlimited (1979). Assisted only by traditional drummers and percussionists, Wright played most of the instruments on the three discs. Wright, along with Taiwo and Kehinde, were able to flawlessly bring traditional and electric styles together…………… 

I heard a song by the Lijadu Sisters on a compilation last year and was impressed enough to seek out a full album by them, this 1976 recording being my first choice. Overall, I like it, but I don’t think it’s quite the great lost afro-beat album that some listeners might expect. However, I do like the variety of sounds on here, from upbeat, funky tunes to much slower, more haunting numbers. 

The Lijadu Sisters were in fact real sisters, and twins at that! They have been described in reviews, and in the liner notes that come with this CD, as having “ravishing voices” and “gorgeous harmonies.” Well, their singing voices are pleasant enough, but quite frankly I’m not knocked out enough to proclaim their voices as quite that wonderful. For my money, I think the Mahotella Queens are much better at singing and harmonizing. That observation aside, there is still a lot to like on this album, although it’s a short one at only 32 minutes. As noted previously, some of the tracks are indeed lively and infectious, while other tunes are slower and moodier. Some very interesting, socially-concsious lyrics too. One of the real strengths to this group, was the unheralded man who played the organ and guitar on all the songs: Biddy Wright. He also produced this album. His talents and production flourishes, in my opinion, really make this album a winner. 

One of the more interesting songs on this album is “Bobby,” a tune that exudes a breezy ska-like vibe, almost like something you’d hear on the second album by the Specials. A very distinctive track, as is the closing number, the long and atmospheric “Lord Have Mercy.” 

The CD comes with a thin 4-page booklet that includes a biography about the Lijadu Sisters and details about this album. Sadly, no photos of the sisters or the talented Mr. Wright. Still, this is impressive enough that I’ll be seeking out the other studio albums by them that Knitting Factory has reissued….ByDonald E. Gilliland……….. 

Credits 
Alto Saxophone – Felix Shittu 
Bass Guitar – Ade Jolaoso 
Design Concept – Ideas Organisation 
Engineer [Recording] – Emmanuel Akpabio, John Malife, Jubril Ogungbade, Lak Adeniran 
Keyboards – Johnny Wood* 
Lead Guitar, Rhythm Guitar, Tenor Saxophone, Percussion, Bass Guitar, Producer – Biddy Wright 
Written-By, Arranged By – Lijadu Sisters 

Tracklist 
A1 Danger 5:47 
A2 Amebo 4:00 
A3 Life’s Gone Down Low 4:50 
B1 Cashing In 5:57 
B2 Bobby 4:20 
B3 Lord Have Mercy 7:08 

Pavol Hammel, Marián Varga, Radim Hladík “Na II. Programe Sna"1976 Czechoslovakia Jazz Rock Art Rock


Pavol Hammel, Marián Varga, Radim Hladík “Na II. Programe Sna"1976 Czechoslovakia Jazz Rock Art Rock

The result of cooperation pillars of the Czech progressive music - Pavol Hummel from "Ponds”, Marian Varga of “Collegium Musicum” and Radim Hladik from “Modra efect”.


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Tracklist
1 Na Druhom Programe Sna
2 Náhle
3 Letia Husi
4 Voda
5 S Chodníkom Na Chrbte
6 Ľalia Poľná
7 Papageno Z Novej Vsi
8 V Zelenej Pamäti
9 Na Schodoch Gymnázia
10 Správne Žiť
11 Z Ofsajdu
12 Lodička Z Papiera
13 Až Túto Moju Pieseň Dohrajú 

Chenaniah “Chenaniah” 1977 US Private Christian Folk Rock




Chenaniah “Chenaniah” 1977 very rare US Private Christian Folk Rock

Minnesota certainly seems to have had its share of cool Jesus music lps, and Chenaniah is a prime example. The group consists of Bruce Muckala, Stephen West and Kenny Ronning. They have a wonderful homespun rural rock sound featuring gentle vocals overtop 6 and 12-string acoustic guitars, electric guitar backing/leads, bass and drums. They often strike a resemblance to the country-rock side of Harvest Flight and Rainbow Promise, while mixing in some of America’s melodic optimism. Nice upbeat mid-tempo electric tracks like ‘Water Of Life’, ‘Hold Me’, ‘Out Comes The Polish’ and ‘Day After Day’. Beautiful acoustic ballads as well, including the dreamy flute-accompanied ‘Gift Of Love’, ‘September’ with moving cello backing, and the graceful Leo Kottke-ish instrumental ‘Chenaniah’. A touch of the Flying Burritos/Byrds style on ‘A Real Love’. All original songs. The band derived their name from a character in I Chronicles 15:22, described as a minister of song. Glorious purple and green fantasy cover illustration. 500 made. (The Archivist, 4th edition by Ken Scott). 



Private Press LP put out in 1977. Only 1000 were issued. I don’t know much about how to describe a record but this is in very good condition. I’ve only played it twice (even though one of the musicians is my relative)….the plastic seal is still around most of the album cover. There is a small tear on the back cover, approx. ½" in lower left. Garage/rock band group from Bagley, Minnesota. Here is what Acid Archives says about the record: “Little-known Christian 1970s melodic folkrock at the commercial westcoast end of the spectrum, comparable to Harvest Flight. Opens with excellent psych-vibe track….nice arrangements with guitar tapestries and smooth CSN/America vocal harmonies, some countryrock moves, listenable OK with a relaxed, non-preaching attitude….a few lowkey folk tracks with acoustic guitar and strings project an appealing Tim Hardin feel.” ...

Tracklist 
1 Water Of Life
2 Dont Let Me Wonder
3 Tear In Eye Broken Heart
4 A Real Love
5 Hold Me
6 Gift Of Love
7 Out Comes The Polish
8 September
9 Day After Day
10 Chenaniah
11 Rest And Comforter
12 Parable Of The Kingdom 

download.Password: 2016

http://www.mediafire.com/file/2buxut34owd0kyd/1977+-+Chenaniah.rar

Rhubarb’s Revenge "Confessions Of A Big Lanky Dope" 1973 US mega rare home made Private Psych Rock only 100 copies pressed original





Rhubarb’s Revenge  "Confessions Of A Big Lanky Dope" 1973 US mega rare  home made Private Psych Rock only 100 copies pressed original
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The tongue­in­cheek psychedelic rock rarity “Confessions of A Big Lanky Dope” album from ‘73. Fewer then 100 copies were pressed of the original, which came in plain white sleeve.This CD reissue will feature the original colored pastel concept art, which never made it to the Lp cover. Has 2 non-LP bonus tracks…………. 
'Charming stoned college dorm hippie folkrock obscurity in the typical quirky Eastcoast style. Opens with excellent original in a Patron Saints direction, rest is mainly covers of classic tracks from the UK 1967-68 scene, giving the album an odd retro/tribute flavor. The Zombies, Kinks and Move all get the Rhubarb treatment in a rather irresistable way with unpretentious vocals and the loose weedhead drumming in particular a treat. There’s also a funny Star Trekked version of 'Mr. Spaceman’ with ad libbed lyrics such as “you’re a motherfu*kin’ good-for-nothing spaceman”, band uses a full on rock setting plus piano but create an intimate spontaneous sound. I’ve seen this described as a 'novelty’ LP, and while it’s pretty entertaining I think it has as much worth as any other document of the early 70s Eastcoast, like the Georgie Leonard album of 'Tool Shed’. - Acid Archives…………. 

One of two things tends to result when a bunch of friends, who are not particularly skilled musically, get together to piddle around on instruments every night as accompaniment to their beer drinking: a self-indulgent, unlistenable mess or some incompetently inspired noodling. With Rhubarb’s Revenge it is a mixture of both extremes. Not quite the lost classic that it’s been made out to be, the sole album from this collective is, instead, one of the oddest, audaciously uneven chunks of aural lunacy from the early 1970s. Still, it is a treasure of some sort, if a periodically maddening one. One cannot tell if their cover versions of songs by the Zombies, Kinks, Byrds, Move, Rolling Stones, and CSNY are meant in homage or as parodies, or if they were just motivation-free goofs: “Time of the Season” loses the mystical aloofness that makes the Zombie classic so wonderful and replaces it with seemingly austere portentousness and funky electric guitar chords; and “Words of Aaron” is played pretty straight but the band still manages to deflate some of the song’s vague pomposity and color it with a fragile beauty. They also turn the Stones’ “2000 Man” into a White Album-like outtake, and the Kinks’ “Victoria” into the finest Three Dog Night/Canned Heat grafting ever attempted, oddly enough making it one of the best performances on the album. “Mr. Spaceman” here seems somehow more “authentically” country than (though ultimately not as excellent as) the Byrds version and at least as much fun, with a goofball charm all its own. Their cover of “Ohio,” on the other hand, almost reaches the heights of the original but in a much more demo-like, ramshackle way. Chris Breetveld manages to sound like Neil Young’s little brother, and although the harmonies are (understandably) not even close to being as pristine as those of CSNY, the band adds lovely, poignant flute flourishes. Given the number of covers present, the original Rhubarb’s Revenge songs are surprisingly accomplished: “Lonely,” with a melody that Jim Croce could have wrapped his voice around, is far too short; “When I Feed My Prize Hog” shows a Zappa influence, but replaces his doo wop with barbershop gospel; and “Nice Spot in the Dark” shamelessly steals the bassline from “Sympathy for the Devil,” but turns it into the basis for a tremendous Santana-cum-CSNY groove. Everything finally comes together on the fabulous “Tomorrow Begins Today”; there are unconventionally good harmony arrangements, rhythmic shifts that come out of nowhere, touches of soul, and a perfectly placed saxophone, not to mention in-the-pocket, coctail-jazz playing. Although certainly a part of the band members’ m.o., silliness is not as prevalent on the album as the liner notes (and all superficial appearances) would lead one to believe, and the competence level of the musicianship is actually quite high. The recording quality is less than perfect, but the production touches and arrangements are refreshingly intuitive and perceptive. Rhubarb’s Revenge could have done some real damage in an actual studio…………by Stanton Swihart…… 

1970s, almost every night a group of friends who called themselves RoadApples (Greg Shuss, Chris Breetveld, Rob Rothschild, Rich Larsen, Bill DiMartino) gathered after work in «Pink Grass Studios» (but simply in the house Chris Breetveld) in Kendall Park , New Jersey. Young people drinking beer and played something similar to music. And all the while recording their musical experiments dvuhkatushechny tape «Sony». In early 1973, Chris’s father announced that he and his family had to leave India in a five-year trip through UNICEF. Realizing that Breetveld take my tape recorder with me and thus deprive the other regulars musical gatherings records on which they worked during the past several years, RoadApples decided to print a dozen copies of their works to the memory of each member. And in the autumn of the same year, it was privately printed on vinyl as much as much as 100 copies under the title «Rhubarb’s Revenge Or Confessions Of A Big Lanky Dope». Determined to learn the sales price band musical delights, Breetveld LP took a trip and at the first stop on his way to India has shown its music publisher on Denmark Street in London. The publisher rejected it, as indeed it did, and all subsequent ones, which Chris invited to listen to the record, until the family arrived in New Delhi … Only in 1999, LP was reissued by the label «Gear Fab» with four added bonuses, cut from the original album due to length limitations. Most of the album’s first hand - it covers of «The Kinks» song, «The Byrds», «CSNY» and «The Zombies». The originals on the second side………………….. 

Band: 
Acoustic Guitar – Michael Rothkopf 
Acoustic Guitar [12 String], Bass – Richard Larsen 
Acoustic Guitar, Violin – Rene Roques 
Bass, Saxophone – Halbert Horatio Ketofsky 
Drums, Congas, Sounds [Refrigerator] – Robert Rotschild 
Drums, Noises [Pasta] – William DiMartino* 
Guitar [Lead] – Christopher Zaic 
Guitar, Drums, Piano, Bass, Flute – Christopher Breetveld 
Percussion – Funky Eddie 
Piano, Vibraphone [Vibes], Noises – Gregory Shuss 
Vocals – Michael Carlos Parmenter, Stephen Stein 

Track List 
01 Intro- man to man - 3:05 
02 Time of the season - 3:43 
03 Victoria - 3:39 
04 Mr. spaceman - 3:00 
05 Words of aaron - 6:03 
06 Lonely - 1:32 
07 Tomorrow begins today - 4:56 
08 When i feed my prize hog - 1:00 
09 Nice spot in the dark - 6:20 
10 Avon girl - 4:05 
11 2000 man [#] - 2:57 
12 Prize hoggies #2 [#] - 1:14 
13 Ohio [#] - 3:15 
14 Roadapple jammies [#] - 1:13 

White Duck "In Season" 1972 US Psych Country Rock












White Duck  "In Season" 1972 US Psych Country Rock
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The second album "White duck", was the last. In 1972, during the recording of "In Season" the group added guitarist, pianist, singer and songwriter John Hiatt. On this album, every musician has contributed his palette. Hyatt has composed two songs "You Caught Me Laughin '" and "Sail Away", which then became the basis for his signature sound in his solo work. After the collapse of the largest group was able to achieve success then it was John Hiatt - was nominated for 11 awards "Grammy" and won many other awards in the music industry. He has released 18 studio albums and two live albums. His songs are performed by Linda Ronstadt, Bonnie Raitt, Eric Clapton, BB King, Willie Nelson, "Three Dog Night", Joan Baez, Paula Abdul, Buddy Guy, Jimmy Buffett, Iggy Pop, Emmylou Harris, Dave Edmunds, Nick Lowe, "The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band", Rosanne Cash, Jeff Healey, Keith Urban and many others. So, a group of "White Duck" deserves to come back from oblivion, not only because it has recorded two great albums, but more was also the launch pad for John Hiatt.........

Tracks:
01. Carry Love – 3:46
02. Firewater – 2:40
03. You Caught Me Laughin’ – 3:16
04. Thank You – 3:14
05. Sail Away – 3:27
06. Bull Island Boogie – 4:56
07. Honey, You’ll Be Alright (Do What Ya Gotta Do) – 2:28
08. Lazy Days – 3:52
09. A Girl Who – 3:25
10. Again – 2:54
11. Looney Tune – 2:31

Personnel:
Mario Friedel – bass, keyboards, vocals
Doyle Grisham – steel guitar
John Hiatt — guitar, piano, vocals
Don Kloetzke — keyboards, vocals
Andrew McMahon — keyboards
Stephen J. Mendell, Lummp Williams – bass
Skip Rogers – vocals
Doug Yankus — accordion, guitar, vocals
Paul Tabet – drums, vocals
Buzz Cason – producer

Moosknukkl Groovband "Moosknukkl Groovband" 1973 Canada Prog Boogie Rock:Spiegelei/Aamok Label Germany















Moosknukkl Groovband  "Moosknukkl Groovband" 1973 Canada Prog Boogie Rock. Spiegelei/Aamok Label Germany
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Multi-instrumentalist Mike Lewis, a Canadian by birth, began his musical career in «The Big Town Boys» group, based in Toronto. In 1964 he left the group and went to study in Munich. In the early 70's, in search of fame and fortune in the music field, actively participated in the German musical get-together, where he met with quite a well-known at the time a producer Conny Plank. First on the Rights of the absolute, they experiment, under the name «Wired», created the album «Free Improvisation», the content of which is quite consistent with its title. A few months later, Lewis, Plank and American percussionist and composer Michael Ranta to record session, which was not published until 40 years later on the Belgian label «Metaphon» titled «Mu» limited edition of 500 copies. Planck then helped Lewis to record a solo album titled «Wuschel» and finally, in 1973, Mike got another record, this time under the rather strange name of «Moosknukkl Groovband», where he and his band played a much more down to earth and very good , experimental guitar-keyboard prog with a dash of blues-rock and boogie-rock. his former colleagues from the group «The Big Town Boys» were brought to record the album. The album was released on the label «Spiegelei», the number of printed copies - 3000 pieces. Apparently, it was the peak of his creative career of Mike Lewis. Unfortunately, after the release of this album, he and his colleagues in the group disappeared from the musical field of view..............

Credits
Bass, Vocals – John Morton
Composed By – Michael Lewis*
Design – Peter Bruce
Drums, Tabla, Percussion, Vocals – Brother Josh
Engineer – Conny Plank
Guitar, Percussion, Vocals – Tommy Graham
Keyboards, Percussion, Vocals – Mike Lewis
Producer – Conny Plank, Michael Lewis*
Written-By – Michael Lewis*

Tracklist
A1 Run For Your Life 5:03
A2 Take Your Time 7:51
A3 Muskoka Springtime 5:08
B1 Rip-Off Jack 7:09
B2 Nahi Bole 7:54
B3 That Ain't All 8:57 

Trettioåriga Kriget "Krigssång" 1976 Swedish Prog Rock





Trettioåriga Kriget  "Krigssång" 1976 Swedish Prog Rock best 200 European Prog Albums in 70`s
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Legendary Swedish heavy-progressive who released 6 albums between 1974 and 1992 (plus a retrospective in 1996) and reunited and released a couple of new albums from 2004 and on. However, the only addition to the normal guitar, bass and drums instrumentation is some mellotron here and there. It’s musical excellence with plenty of extended gratuitous guitar jams and very intricate lyrics. I’d like to recommend this band to everyone but since the lyrics are in Swedish and such a big part of the music perhaps some might not understand it. In several ways, TRETTIOÅRIGA KRIGET (“The 30-year War” in English) can be compare to ÄNGLAGÅRD and LANDBERK to sense their influence. 

The first, self-titled is in many ways like RUSH circa 1980. “Krigssång” is an album that fans of 70’s rock in general will enjoy, and not just progressive rock listeners. In sum, this is one of the defining Scandinavian prog albums. The first two albums are necessary for any serious exploration of the region. The albums released after the reunion show that the band hasn’t lost their touch!……… 

Great progressive rock band from Sweden, and this is a wonderful follow up to their incredible debut two years earlier. 
This album would appeal to anyone who enjoys Yes, Greenslade, Camel ect. The guitarist is very skilled, and has a sound a bit like Steve Howe at times. They use piano and mellotron to a great effect also. The rhythm section is outstanding. The bass player is hard not to notice, as he seems to continuously challenge the lead guitar, and sounds a bit like Chris Squire…nice Rickenbacker 4003 wah wah sounding bass lines, though from what photos and video footage I’ve seen he appears to playing a Fender Jazz bass. The drummer is quite impressive as well. The lineup on this LP includes a fifth member credited as lyricist. I wish I understood Swedish, as the vocalist really has a great prog rock deliverance…in the same vein as Peter Farrelly of “Fruup”, though some may find his style annoying. Still a pleasure to listen to for me, even though I’ll probably never know what he’s singing about. 
The Bands name translated into English means,“Thirty Years War”. 
Recommended………………











Second album seems also the easier one to acquire since I have never seen the others in shops. War Songs is the translation of this album and it is a rather fitting name for such a raw and somber record even if the album is definitely more “refined/subtle” both in songwriting and in production, compazred to its predecessor. But this album still sounds the typical TK sound, somewhere between the ultra-heavy and the progressive. If you are not well-acquainted with the group, you will get a slap in the face, with the guitar strings leaving an imprint in your brains, but chances are that you could feel repulsion upon the first listen (hopefully this review will prevent or at least warn of that danger) or even wondering how this can be prog. Fear not: this is!! And of course the side-long heavy (and I mean HEAVYYY;-) title track, full of mellotrons and jazz twists is a rather unique example of prog, even if not that much my cup of tea, I will admit……………… 

.Great, I say. Can’t wait. When the package arrives I’m faced with six albums by artists I’ve never heard. I decide to start with Trettioåriga Kriget’s Krigssång, from 1975. A little research reveals that the band is still active with its lineup intact and that they played Prog Day in Chapel Hill, just down the road from me. I figure this could be good. So after having a couple of listens to this, what do I think? I think this is one of the best progressive rock albums I’ve ever heard. 

The keyboards are very understated, but when present, support the other instrumentation nicely. The stars of the show is the bass work of Stefan Fredin and the guitar of Christer Åkerberg, although Dag Lundquist’s drum work is top notch as well. Robert Zima’s vocals are strong as well, but listeners not familiar with the Swedish language may need a few listens to get adjusted to it, but once you do you’ll discover Zima has a wonderfully rich, evocative voice. 

The first five tracks are all relatively short and every song is near perfection in execution and composition. This is exactly how shorter progressive pieces should be done. Nothing ever stays around in the songs to get boring and yet, you never feel like anything is rushed or hurried for the sake of getting in an extra guitar figure or bass run. These songs are economical and exciting. 

The highlight of the album is the 17 minute title track. I can’t really find the words to accurately describe just how good this is. You’ll just have to find out for yourself. 

The production is perfect throughout the album. The particular copy I have is remastered and was reissued last year on the Mellotronen label. Three additional tracks are included, but as is the case in may reissues they sound a bit tacked on. All three are very good and almost as good as the songs on the actual album, but should be taken as what they are, extra songs…….. 

For their sophomore release “Krigssång”, the guys from Trettioåriga Kriget decided to take the powerful heavy prog approach of their debut album to a subtler level, administering the rougher moments more in a refurbished balance that gave more room to less explicit sonic explorations. This factor also allowed the band to state some relatedness to the standard of symphonic prog at times (some people have mentioned German symphonic bands such Novalis, and I would add Wallenstein, but mostly to my ears, TK’s symphonic side is closer to “Remember the Future”-era Nektar). The namesake opener is obviously based on a blues tempo, which receives a particularly sophisticated treatment all the way through its 4 ½ time span since TK remain loyal to their art-rock ambitions. Track 2 ‘Metamorfoser’ starts digging deeper into the sort of slow tempo that had been delivered in the opener’s main motif, only this time the energetic moments that eventually emerge bear a jazzier tendency and state a more consistent presence, in this way catalyzing the main motif’s melodic development. I have the feeling that both tracks would have benefited greatly from longer expansions and a major use of mellotron (or whichever other keyboard that drummer Dag Lundqvist might have used at the time) in order to properly explore the epic potencial further and see where things can go from there. Anyway, this is what there is and what you see is what you get. 'Jag och jag och jag’ is an acoustic pastoral ballad that is stylistically connected with the sort of folkish spirit that one can expect from the candid side of 70s art-rock: since the central mood is quite introspective, this ballad serves as a convenient moment of simple solace before the arrival of 'Mitt mirakel’ (originally omitted from the 70s vinyl but luckily recovered for the 2004 CD re-edition), a fine example of the interesting things that TK are capable of when they systematically incorporate clever jazzy flavors into their heavy prog sound: the rhythm duo’s dynamics is excellent, and so are Åkerberg’s deliveries on guitar harmonies/lead phrasings. Once again I find myself longing for a different, alternative Universe in which this track is longer and with a fuller global sound, although essentially I don’t have any complaints at all about the track’s compositional structure. 'Murar’ is basically structured around the linkage of two different jams: the faster one is reserved for the second place, in this way allowing the overall mood to give the impression of elaborating a controlled sonic discourse headlong for a specific climax. So far here are the rougher passages in the album, but there is some more roughness in store concerning some moments of the forthcoming suite. The album’s final track is the 17 ½ minute long 'Krigssång II’, an excellent, exciting suite that ultimately fulfills its musical ideas in a hyperbolic accomplishment of an usual progressive leitmotif - an extended, well-articulated series of sections properly arranged to conform an ambitious taste for art in rock. Here is where the band’s moderate flirtations with symphonic prog lie and get an effective development. Fredin’s bass playing sounds somewhat Squire- related in places, although by no means should anyone read that Yes is some notable influence on the band. A special motif that reappears recurrently (sometimes augmented by synth) helps to reassure the whole expansive track’s cohesion. In terms of harmonic expansions and motif linking, this piece is monumentally successful; the jam that gets started around minute 5 brings some colorful psychedelia while it lasts, and it also prepares the room for the following defined section. A jamming that takes place a few minutes later sure reminds me of Nektar and “Inside”-era Eloy (to a degree, at least). The slow passages are energetic enough as to encapsulate some of the melodically driven pomposity that is one of the undeniable trademarks of symph prog. For the coda, things turn to a faster tempo and an increased groove: the fact that the rhythm section gets jazzy helps to keep things ordained as the rhythm goes on intensifying the mood. Actually, I would have loved to hear some impressive guitar lead as the track approaches its end: otherwise, on a good note, the fade-out has been arranged in a very clever fashion, stating an eerie reiteration of the coda’s harmonic basis. A very good ending for a very good suite, indeed. The 2004 CD edition comprises three live bonuses besides the official repertoire plus the originally intended track 4 that I have mentioned earlier. Compared to the debut album, this one is noticeably less explosive in general and less expansive regarding the first half: the last half compensates for it largely. TK is by now a heavy prog band with a refurbished interest in developing a new, more refined side to it……by Cesar Inca ……………… 

The best progressive album from Sweden? Well, I tend to agree. Or rather, know it is. At least as far as the 70’s is concerned. There are otther great bands from Sweden but none as great as Trettioåriga Kriget was on this album. I came across it in a little recordstore about 20 years ago and loved it right from the start. 
In Sweden there was a strong political agenda associated with prog (or progg, as it is known). There were many bands, not all musically gifted. Alot of bands were actually musically challenged, if you wish. Trettioåriga Kriget was a band of great musicianship and brilliance, never as evident as on Krigssång, still retaining the political message of socialism. 

The musical content (with it’s very prominent bass) is amazing. Not only in the playing but more so in the songs themselves. It is a blend of hard rock, symphonic and fusion like stuff. I think of Stanley Clarke, sometimes, and maybe I am not that far off. Stanley Clarke playing in Rush, could be a comparison not straying too far off the mark. 

From the first second to the last, this album delivers in spades and keeps on being spellbinding. This is a masterful and epic creation, worthy of praise and recognition. Listen and be amazed…..by GruvanDahlman ………….. 

Trettioariga Kriget’s debut was considered as the first true Heavy Rock album from Sweden, but actually it was more than that.It did receive some excellent reviews and the band had a chance for an exhausting tour on Swedish ground as well as extended visits on the Swedish radio.The second album of the band “Krigssang” carried again an epic title (means “War song” in Swedish) and it was recorded in summer 75’ at the Polyvox Studios in Stockholm, but not released until early 76’.This time the vinyl was marked with original CBS press. 
This was another great example of hard-hitting, powerful Progressive Rock with psychedelic overtones, highlighted by the monumental Scandinavian feeling, the poetic lyrics and the dynamic, passionate performances of the band.While mainly guitar-driven, their style had still plenty of clever moves, complicated breaks and a good balance between instrumental variety and vocal performances.Plenty of unexpected shifting tempos and influences from KING CRIMSON, DEEP PURPLE and LED ZEPPELIN are always in the menu.Moreover they also dish out some lovely acoustic textures with a melancholic touch, while Mellotron waves appear quite often, adding a nice orchestral flavor to the passionate sound of the band.The centerpiece of the album is of course the 17-min.“Krigssang 2”, a nice piece of complex, guitar-based Progressive Rock with the usual Mellotron showering as the absolute highlight and some surprising synth lines as well.It often sounds like a mix of RUSH with YES, although being far from any symphonic tendencies, but certainly drawing some inspiration from STEVE HOWE’s acrobatic guitar moves.It passes from vocal-based Rock to early-70’s Psychedelic Rock to stunning Progressive Rock in a blink of an eye with numerous gear shifts and very tight executions. 

Yet another thumbs up for one of Sweden’s leading Rock bands from the 70’s.Combination of passionate Hard Rock ala LED ZEPPELIN and DEEP PURPLE with intricate Progressive Rock in the vein of YES, RUSH and KING CRIMSON.Strongly recommended……….by apps79 …………. 


Personnel: 
– Robert Zima – lead vocals 
– Christer Åkerberg – electric & acoustic guitars 
– Stefan Fredin – bass, vocals 
– Dag Lundquist – drums, violin, Mellotron, vocals 

Tracks: 
01. Krigssång/War song (Stefan Fredin/Olle Thörnvall) – 4:33 
02. Metamorfoser/Metamorphoses (Christer Åkerberg/Olle Thörnvall) – 4:33 
03. Jag och jag och “jag”/I and I and “I” (Christer Åkerberg/Olle Thörnvall) – 3:20 
04. Mitt mirakel/My miracle (Dag Lundquist/Olle Thörnvall) – 3:31 
05. Murar/Walls (Stefan Fredin/Dag Lundquist/Christer Åkerberg) – 4:20 
06. Krigssång II/War song II (Stefan Fredin/Olle Thörnvall) – 17:32 
Bonuses: 
07. On Going To England (live) (Stefan Fredin/Olle Thörnvall) – 7:23 
08. Ur djupen/Out of the depths (live) (Stefan Fredin/Olle Thörnvall) – 6:42 
09. So Long (live) (Stefan Fredin/Olle Thörnvall) – 7:05 






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