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29 Apr 2017

The 21st Century Sound Movement ‎"The 21st Century Sound Movement"1968 US Private Garage Psych




The 21st Century Sound Movement ‎"The 21st Century Sound Movement"1968 US ultra rare Private Garage Psych
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When it seems, that nothing else could be discovered in the garage/psych scene always something interesting pops out. Like ‘EVOL’ last year for example, or perhaps 'Nimbus’, but today I’m presenting you '21st Century Sound’. Roger Maglio at Gear Fab has just released the tapes on the CD and there’s also going to be a vinyl version in the near future. 

There are absolutely no names mentioned on the album. The only thing we know is that one of the members was Jackie, because when they play “Fire” you can hear words “Let Jackie take over”. Everything else is unknown. The LP was recorded around mid 1969. On the recordings there was mostly non original material, but they played in that typical amateurish magical 60’s way if you know what I mean, except for the song “For The Rest Of My Life”, which was their song. 

The release includes two bonus tracks from their 45, released on 'Cave Records’. Both songs on 45 are originals. The album was recorded at Damon Studios in Kansas City, Missouri and the cover photo was taken at nearby Volker Fountain. So we should start searching for the members around this area. The cover songs actually sound very nice with great 60’s spirit. I can only wish to talk to the members in the near future. The album is recommended to any psych/garage fans….by psychedelic baby………..

Tracklist 
A1 Don’t Let The Sun Catch You Crying 
Written-By – Fred Mardsen*, Gerrard Mardsen*, Les Chadwick, Les Maguire* 
2:23 
A2 House Of The Risin’ Sun 
Written-By – Alan Price 
4:08 
A3 The Weight 
Written-By – J.R. Robertson* 
3:59 
A4 Fire 
Written-By – Jimi Hendrix 
2:11 
A5 Hey Jude 
Written-By – Lennon-McCartney 
5:11 
B1 Mercy, Mercy, Mercy 
Written-By – J.E. Zawinul* 
2:28 
B2 Susie Q 
Written-By – Hawkins*, Broadwater*, Lewis* 
3:28 
B3 Light My Fire 
Written-By – Morrison*, Densmore*, Manzarek*, Krieger* 
2:30 
B4 For The Rest Of My Life 
Written-By – 21st Century Sound Movement* 
3:02 
B5 In-A-Gadda-Da-Vidda 
Written-By – Doug Ingle 
7:31

Tennessee Farm Band “Communion” 1977 US Private Hippie Psych Jam










Tennessee Farm Band “Communion” 1977  US Private  Hippie Psych Jam..recommended..!
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Credits 
Bass – Michael Sullens 
Drums – David Chalmers 
Engineer – Tim Turner 
Guitar, Vocals – Walter Rabideau 
Vocals – Linda Hershfield 
Vocals, Keyboards, Saxophone – Thomas Dotzler

Tracklist 
A1 Electric Glue 5:12 
A2 King Tut’s In Chicago 5:14 
A3 The First Time 6:15 
B1 Hot Tofu Medley 9:52 
B2 Makin’ Up For Lost Time 6:25 

Colores “Es Mejor Olvidar +3” 1975 EP Spain Private Heavy Psych Rock



Colores “ Es Mejor Olvidar +3” 1975 EP  Spain Private Heavy Psych Rock
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=So14QDBWDW8

Tracklist
A1 Es Mejor Olvidar
A2 La Bruja
B1 Rompecabezas
B2 Años Luz 

Alquitran ‎ “Alquitran” 1977 Spain Prog Rock







Alquitran ‎ “Alquitran” 1977 Spain Prog Rock
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V4XaXWDyBP8

Very unique single-disc band. The original edition of this LP is quoted (or quoted) for bizarre amounts, although it has been recently reissued. It was published in the no less obscure stamp AUVI, also responsible for the second and last of Borne and also second and last of Barcelona Traction. Neither the LP of Tar nor these two have been reedited on CD………….

Tracklist 
A1 El Ascensor
A2 Ocaso De Un Play Boy
A3 Pais
A4 Nosotros
A5 La Escalera
B1 Ellos
B2 Entre Soles Densos
B3 Hacia Una Nueva Luz
B4 Ni Idea 

Objectivo ‎ Portugal Prog Psych Rock all singles 1969-72













Objectivo ‎ Portugal Prog Psych Rock all singles 1969-72
Objectivo ‎ “A Place In The Sky” 1969 Portugal EP 

Objectivo ‎ “Glory - Keep Your Love Alive"1970 single 

Objectivo ‎ "This Is How We Say (Goodbye)The Dance Of Death"1970 single 7″

Objectivo ‎"Out Of The Darkness-Music” 1972 single 7" 
Group formed from the extinction of groups like the Ekos and the Showmen, in the years 60.Were a Portuguese group, but had the particularity to include in its bosom american and english musicians between they guitarist Jim Cregan, who was later a member of Cockney Rebel Steve Harley and musician of Rod Stewart’s band.

In 1970 was recorded the first disc stereo in Portugal and the authors were OBJECTIVO. The album, a single, contained the themes of “Dance of Death” and “This Is How We Say Goodbye.” 

Daniel Vega ‎ “La Noche Que Precede A La Batalla” 1976 Spain Prog Folk



Daniel Vega ‎ “La Noche Que Precede A La Batalla” 1976 Spain Prog Folk

This is one of the big surprises that the Spanish progressive scene has yet to give to all worldwide prog fans. Daniel Vega (not to be confused with the other Vega who released the well- known Andaluza album), was an excellent musician from Asturias, in the north of Spain. 
This is his sole album, and it’s an outstanding progressive folk record with Daniel writing and singing all tracks except two instrumentals. Fully remastered sound, original gatefold cover artwork, and 500 copies only. Strongly recommended!………….

Tracklist 
La Noche Que Precede A La Batalla 
A1 La Noche Que Precede A La Batalla 2:00 
A2 Jinete 1:52 
A3 Alma Gemela 3:54 
A4 Hacia La Eternidad 2:58 
A5 Compañeros 2:45 

Cantábrico 
B1 Tierra Minera 1:00 
B2 Esperando Al Sol 2:23 
B3 Cantábrico: El Vuelo Del Albatros / Acantilado 2:15 
B4 Madre Asturias 3:12 
B5 Ciudad Luminosa 1:30 
B6 El Sol Cruza Todas Las Fronteras 1:25 

Jaume Sisa "Orgia" 1971 Spain Prog Folk,Folk Rock










Jaume Sisa  "Orgia" 1971  Spain Prog Folk,Folk Rock
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jqv4UNVUSL0&list=PLnNlup9QRYAKCUnOPDr06OO4ZSQhtB5mN&index=4

“Jaume Sisa was an important part of Musica Dispersa and is a folk-rock artist with a very idiosyncratic style. His first album Orgia was a prime example of psychedelic rock the Spanish way with Sisa followings his whim much like Robin Williamson (of Incredible String Band) in his heyday. The vocals and harmonica playing is a little indebted to Bob Dylan, but of course this is a lot stranger. Elsewhere there are kazoos, piano, tablas, recorders, snippets of tapes, and even occasional strings and brass. The same year, 1971, that Musica Dispersa was released, he also put out this great solo album. Crazy acid folk with lots of humour and weird vocals by Sisa himself.”……………

Tracklist 
A1 Risas
A2 Carrer
A3 Joc De Boles
A4 Comiendo Pollo
A4 Menjant Pollastre
A5 En El Castell
A6 Paisatge
A7 Cap A La Roda
B1 Els Reis Del Pais Deshabitat
B2 El Casament
B3 L'Amor A Les Rodes De L'Amor
B4 La Presó De Les Rodes
B5 Pasqua Florida

Discography: 
1968- L'Home Dibuixat 
1971- L'Orgia 
1975- Qualsevol Nit Pot Sortir el Sol 
1976- Galeta Galàctica 
1977- La Catedral 
1979- La Màgia de L'Estudiant 
1979- Antaviana 
1980- Sisa i Melodrama 
1981- Nit de Sant Joan 
1981- Noche de San Juan 
1982- Barcelona Postal 
1983- Roda la Música 
1984- Transcantautor 
1985- Sisa (Recopilatori) 
1994- Sisa: “El més galàctic” (Recopilatori) 
1996- “El Viajante”, amb Mestres, Llamado i Solfa (Disc-llibre) 
2002- Bola voladora (Drac/Virgin) 

Landberk “Indian Summer"1996 Sweden Prog Rock





Landberk “Indian Summer"1996 Sweden Prog Rock
full
By whatever stroke of grace or good fortune Scandinavia became a crucible of Progressive Rock in the 1990s, with Sweden in particular a nest of musical creativity to rival Italy in the ‘70s. The talent pool at the time was deep enough to hide even a first- rate outfit like LANDBERK, who in a perfect world could have rivaled the popularity of their compatriots in THE FLOWER KINGS (who, let’s face it, were never really very Nordic, probably a key to their international success).
I first heard LANDBERK on the Musea label "Progfest '95” CDs, sandwiched in between the Japanese gender-bent ELP clone ARS NOVA and the high octane Latin language fusion of DEUS EX MACHINA (the previous year’s compilation had introduced me to, among others, fellow Swede favorites ÄNGLAGÅRD and ANEKDOTEN). Landberk was the notable exception to the largely instrumental bias of the show: a song-based band with a spiky post-Punk guitar sound not far removed from JOY DIVISION or CRISPY AMBULANCE (or the pompous phonies of U2, if you want a really cheap comparison).

Likewise they also favored a mood of introspective gloom that the late Ian Curtis might have appreciated, although here it was expressed with a subtlety and nuance not often found in the typically grandiose ambitions of Progressive Rock. The music on this, their latest to date (and last ever?) studio album, is steeped in the same unique Midnight Sun melancholy, giving even the more up-tempo numbers (“Dustgod”, “Dreamdance”) an indelible air of wistful regret.

The production is sharp, the packaging is classy (again, unlike the histrionic visual overkill of too much Prog Rock cover art), and the performances are uniformly excellent. Listen to the relaxed yet confident drumming of Jonas Lindholm. Or Simon Nordberg’s keyboards, employed more for atmospheric color rather than the usual virtuoso wanking. And Reine Fiske proves himself a guitarist of rare delicacy and understated strength. His playing over the long fade out of “All Around Me”, or during the climactic chorus of “Why Do I Still Sleep” (I just now noticed the telling lack of a question mark in the song’s title), is almost cathartic in its beauty, wringing out every last drop of emotion from his strings.

But is it really Progressive Rock? Only in the same sense that a thoroughly modern rock band like RADIOHEAD can be considered Prog: i.e. in the best, genuinely creative (and not simply derivative) sense of the word. And, of course, they use a mellotron too, so that certainly qualifies them as closet Progheads.

If this was truly LANDBERK’s final album, and after an almost ten-year silence it’s beginning to look likely, they can at least boast of having quit at the top of their game.

.but hold on. Stop the presses: I just learned (honestly, at the very moment of mopping up this review and simultaneously surfing the backwaters of the Prog Archives site) that Reine Fiske and Landberk bassist Stefan Dimle are now members of a new (to me at least) Prog Folk quintet called PAATOS. So will they carry that bittersweet Landberk legacy forward into the new millennium? Stay tuned, a sample download is now in progress….by Neu!mann …….

This swan song album of Landberk shows us a band, which has matured in a way that may not please many prog fans. As pointed out in previous reviews, the influences of their original inspirers are not anymore present, but I see it only as a good thing. The music is soft, clam, melancholic and emotional, and I like it very much. This record is also accessible to listeners not fond of chaotic avant-garde music. The album opens with a great couple of “Humanize” and “All Around Me”, which are tied as a one musical packet. The other highlights for me here are “I Wish I Had A Boat” which is very mournful and beautiful, as is “Why Do I Still Sleep”. The closer “Indian Summer” is a silent post-rock influenced tune. Though the band faded after this, their spirit continues in the band Paatos, check that out if you liked this album (and also Anekdoten’s albums from “From Within”). There are some interesting small details in the arrangements, like the second final verse on “I Wish I Had A Boat”, where the lyrics are echoed as silenced screams, barely audible…….by Eetu Pellonpaa …………….

There are mixed reviews out there for this album. Landberk tried pretty hard to do the dark prog thing for a while, with not much success in my opinion. There was always something better about Anekdoten’s tunes, although Landberk always had the secret weapon of Reine Fiske’s wonderful, delay-drenched guitar leads, which now grace Dungen. This last album is the one where they finally got their own sound, which makes it a shame that it is their last. The band focussed less on traditional Crimson-derived dark prog styles and more on refining what was best about their sound. Indian Summer is extremely, determinedly sparse and wintery, mostly focussed on Fiske’s slowly unfolding melodic leads and subtle mellotron chords. Singer Patric Helje is sometimes compared unfavourably to Bono, but the resemblance is trifling- he’s a serviceable vocalist, although not the main attraction of the group’s sound. This album works best in the slow, ponderous pieces, not so much on slighty more upbeat pieces like “1st of May” or “Dustgod”. But check out the celestial beauty of the second half of “All Around Me”, the delicate melody of “Why Do I Still Sleep?” or the closing instrumental title track to hear melancholy prog at its best. This album may have been an effort to establish a more modern, accessible sound, but whatever Landberk was going for, it works. For fans of Anekdoten, Radiohead, Dungen, Paatos, Mogwai etc, this is a good one to track down……….by Heptade …………………

Incredible to think that this Swedish band released four studio albums over four and a half years. Even more incredible is the fact that this was achieved in the 90’s! Landberk are one of those progressive sounding bands from Scandinavia that endorses the very reason that they are in my opinion second or third after the British for true sounding progressive music output. Indian Summer is a bleak , desolate landscape of sound interspersed by some of the most beautiful guitar playing.Just listen to the second part of the song ’ All around Me’. Another great song is the closing title track ’ Indian Summer’, vocals are almost minimalist in nature. There is a similarity to Landberks sound found in Talk Talk’s Spirit Of Eden and Laughing Stock material. Not easy to get hold of in any media format this album is a must have though to any prog enthusiast. This gets a solid 3 and a half stars rounded up to four. It’s musical quality deserves a solid rating on their final studio release…… by Chris S ………..

Landberk was one of the trio of prog wunderkinds from Sweden that was at the forefront of the fabled prog Renaissance in the early 90s, together with the spectacular (and still active) Anekdoten and the legendary but troubled Anglagard. All three where purveyors of dark, brooding and mystical Norse tendencies , adding colossal doses of dense mellotron, a brutal rhythm section with up front bass and bashingly titanic drums. Sadly, Landberk would dissolve into the fjord mists, unleashing this final “Indian Summer” masterpiece, as well as the intense Morte Macabre cooperative effort with the Anekdoten boys.
This album is a prime example of misunderstood genius, not particularly liked by the fans because of its rather radical low-key atmosphere, quite distant from the previous “Heavy Prog” formula. In fact, it’s so moody it can verge on soporific, like a soundtrack for an opium den. But these guys are full of surprises and they succeed in paving the road for future prog acts such as PTree, NoSound, White Willow, Paatos and the brilliant Sunscape by deliberately expanding on the veil on the sonics, less rock and more roll if you will. Landberk is unquestionably led by the scintillating guitar work of Reine Fiske, a unique somber style that winks reverently at a reserved Fripp or U2’s The Edge on quaaludes combined with an abundant use of fluffy mellotron carpets at the hands of producer Simon Nordberg. Both bassist Stefan Dimle and drummer Jonas Lindholm excel at setting a mood and keeping it firmly anchored, just plain solid.

There are some insanity inducing tracks here that would make Syd blush with respectful envy. “Humanize” is a deep felt excursion into inner pain, a wallowing waft of melodic despair, as close to sonic depression as possible. Cavernous melancholia draped with stalactites of distant memories, the whispery vocals from Patrick Helje are stunningly a propos. “All Around Me” is the 9 minute epic that defines the recording, echoing voice effects within a metronome yet organic beat, eerily close to Steve Wilson’s early material , the jangling guitar slashing the butterfly clouds with soaring ferocity. Even on the more raucous “1st of May” and later on the robust “Dustgod” whether the pace quickens, the intensity remains, verging near a proggier Joy Division or perhaps Radiohead. The music remains focused, edgy and impalpably disturbing . Quite pleasant really! Hahahaha! I mean you need to be respectful of this record as it will not fit easily into a playlist; it’s an experience on its own. Yes, candles and very dim lights are an option when listening to this stuff. “I Wished I had a Boat” is another platonic annoyance of doomed gloom, a palette of pastelled dejection, Helje’s gorgeous voice passionate and yet repentant, a complete prog gem of the highest order. “Dustgod” has a more immediate presence, with a huge vocal melody still mired deeply in atmospherics The brilliantly vaporous “Why Do I Still Sleep” is a true classic, the perfect definition of a prog dirge with Viking overtones. One can imagine a burning funeral “drakkar”, blazing arrows of fire arching towards the aquatic tomb, a heady mixture of pain, regret, respect and sorrow. The repeated Sara Isaksson wailing is hypnotic and tortuous. The title track closes out this peculiar disc, a “not a prog for all seasons” testament to fabulous prog giant that left us way early, for whatever frail human reason. If you want to hunt down one bizarre disc that many will puzzle over, get this stunner…………by tszirmay …………….

Reine Fiske is a genius. He plays guitar unlike anyone I’ve ever heard–on a par with maestro Jeff Beck and the late and, sadly, much obscured blues axeman, Roy Buchanan. Fiske and Beck are similar in the way that the two create astoundingly beautiful and totally unexpected soundscapes with the same implement that all other musicians who claim to play guitar use. The answer to the riddle: What makes them so different? must be that Reine Fiske and Jeff Beck must be gods–or, at the very least, not of the same Earth/human substance as all other guitarists. Seriously: Check out this player. He is a player of a totally different ilk. Indian Summer is my favorite Landberk album, despite some odd familiarity–especially in the vocals (at times I hear striking similarities to ICEHOUSE, THE CHURCH, INXS, and DAVID SYLVIAN). This album shows maturity and, yes, autonimity; they’ve really come into their own sound. It started with the end of One Man Tells Another–the brilliant “Tell.” Indian Summer starts out by hooking you in with the catchy “Humanize” (8/10) but then lags a bit with the next two songs: slightly monotonous, Icehouse/Church-like. “I Wish I Had a Boat” (8/10) picks it back up again in a very David Sylvian-sounding 'avant- ambient’-like way. “Dustgod” (9/10) combines the earlier Icehouse/Church sound and feel with the Sylvian-ness in a brilliant way. “Dreamdance” (9/10) shows off some absolutely amazing guitar playing/styling (all songs on which genius Reine Fiske participates are worth a closer listen, but this one puts his uniquity right in your face). Then comes my favorite, the eight-minute gem called “Why Do I Still Sleep?” with its masterfully delicate guitar stoking and the surprise female vocalist pleading the song title to us at the end. Yeah, with all the crap going on in the world, why do I still sleep? Or, as Jonathan Wilson put it only this yeart, Can we really party today? The finale, the delicate Pat Metheny/New Chatauqua-like title song (6/10) is frankly a bit of a let down. While not a 5 star masterpiece of prog music, this is an excellent album that I highly recommend. And don’t forget Reine Fiske’s other projects: Morte Macabre, the first Päatos album (Timeloss), Dungen, and The Amazing. They’re all worth checking out……….by BrufordFreak ………….
There had already been a significant change in direction between Landberk’s Lonely Land and One Man Tells Another, but nothing that could have foretold the Swedish group’s third and final opus, Indian Summer. Shedding its progressive rock skin, Landberk reinvented itself as a mellow alternative-cum-intelligent rock outfit. Some people will be tempted to compare this album to Pink Floyd’s atmospheric rock, but it has more bite than that, it is less-polished to the bone, more elemental and emotional, hinting at Radiohead’s OK Computer a year before the latter came out. These are slow songs inhabited by understated melodies, atmospheric electric guitars, and slow, thoughtful solos. The album requires some getting used to, especially if you expect something in a more overtly prog rock vein. Tracks like “Humanize,” “I Wish I Had a Boat,” and “Why Do I Still Sleep” reveal their beauties after repeated listens, once you cannot get their melodies out of your head. “1st of May” and “Dustgod” balance the album by bringing harder-rocking moments, although the attention to detail and mood remain unchanged. The title track closes the album with a heartbreakingly simple guitar piece. This album was cruelly overlooked because, coming out of the '90s prog rock network, it was dismissed as being too uncharacteristic by the fans and yet it was unable to reach the wider audience it was targeting. It deserved to succeed – you deserved it………by François Couture ……………..

Landberk was one of the trio of prog wunderkinds from Sweden that was at the forefront of the fabled prog Renaissance in the early 90s, together with the spectacular (and still active) Anekdoten and the legendary but troubled Anglagard. All three where purveyors of dark, brooding and mystical Norse tendencies , adding colossal doses of dense mellotron, a brutal rhythm section with up front bass and bashingly titanic drums. Sadly, Landberk would dissolve into the fjord mists, unleashing this final “Indian Summer” masterpiece, as well as the intense Morte Macabre cooperative effort with the Anekdoten boys.
This album is a prime example of misunderstood genius, not particularly liked by the fans because of its rather radical low-key atmosphere, quite distant from the previous “Heavy Prog” formula. In fact, it’s so moody it can verge on soporific, like a soundtrack for an opium den. But these guys are full of surprises and they succeed in paving the road for future prog acts such as PTree, NoSound, White Willow, Paatos and the brilliant Sunscape by deliberately expanding on the veil on the sonics, less rock and more roll if you will. Landberk is unquestionably led by the scintillating guitar work of Reine Fiske, a unique somber style that winks reverently at a reserved Fripp or U2’s The Edge on quaaludes combined with an abundant use of fluffy mellotron carpets at the hands of producer Simon Nordberg. Both bassist Stefan Dimle and drummer Jonas Lindholm excel at setting a mood and keeping it firmly anchored, just plain solid.

There are some insanity inducing tracks here that would make Syd blush with respectful envy. “Humanize” is a deep felt excursion into inner pain, a wallowing waft of melodic despair, as close to sonic depression as possible. Cavernous melancholia draped with stalactites of distant memories, the whispery vocals from Patrick Helje are stunningly a propos. “All Around Me” is the 9 minute epic that defines the recording, echoing voice effects within a metronome yet organic beat, eerily close to Steve Wilson’s early material , the jangling guitar slashing the butterfly clouds with soaring ferocity. Even on the more raucous “1st of May” and later on the robust “Dustgod” whether the pace quickens, the intensity remains, verging near a proggier Joy Division or perhaps Radiohead. The music remains focused, edgy and impalpably disturbing . Quite pleasant really! Hahahaha! I mean you need to be respectful of this record as it will not fit easily into a playlist; it’s an experience on its own. Yes, candles and very dim lights are an option when listening to this stuff. “I Wished I had a Boat” is another platonic annoyance of doomed gloom, a palette of pastelled dejection, Helje’s gorgeous voice passionate and yet repentant, a complete prog gem of the highest order. “Dustgod” has a more immediate presence, with a huge vocal melody still mired deeply in atmospherics The brilliantly vaporous “Why Do I Still Sleep” is a true classic, the perfect definition of a prog dirge with Viking overtones. One can imagine a burning funeral “drakkar”, blazing arrows of fire arching towards the aquatic tomb, a heady mixture of pain, regret, respect and sorrow. The repeated Sara Isaksson wailing is hypnotic and tortuous. The title track closes out this peculiar disc, a “not a prog for all seasons” testament to fabulous prog giant that left us way early, for whatever frail human reason. If you want to hunt down one bizarre disc that many will puzzle over, get this stunner………………

Similar to the Nordic wave of progressive rock bands that followed the Änglagård in the early 1990s, Landberk undeniably possesses that dark, melancholy side that evokes so well the frozen fogs of the Scandinavian fjords. The last Indian Summer beach, for example, is not so remote in the spirit of some works by Terje Rypdal, Ketil Bjonrstad, or even the introspective Pat Metheny of the early ECM label. But unlike groups such as Änglagård, Kaipa, Sinkadus, Pär Lindh Project or the Flowers Kings, Landberk does not use the progressive music canons defined by the groups of the 70’s like Genesis, Pink Floyd, ELP or Yes. Difficultly classifiable, his music is simple, melodic, based on an immutable rhythm and reveals multiple influences that often have nothing to do with each other. All Around Me or Dustgod thus recall a U2 whose rock would have remained more alternative than commercial, comparison further reinforced by the deep and dragging voice of the singer who is in the same timbre as that of Bono. Other beaches are like Van De Graaf Generator, Anekdoten or even the Simple Minds of the beginnings. The keyboard, mellotron and Hammond organ, sometimes barely audible, are largely dominated by Reine Fiske’s guitar played in a clear register with effects of vibrato and echo. No solos or complex interplays of instruments, above all the economy of means, and it is more the rhythm, imposed by Jonas Lindholm’s throbbing drums and the very present bass of Stefan Dimle, which is the main thread of These minimalist melodies closer to Art Rock than Progressive (at least in its most common definition). 1st Of May, Dustgod and Dreamdance more removed bring a welcome diversity in the repertoire and contribute to the fact that this disc is listened to with pleasure. Unfortunately, Indian Summer was the most original and the best but also the last work of Landberk missing soon after south of the Arctic Circle. The guitarist and bassist have since resurfaced, first with Morte Macabre (Symphonic Holocaust, 1998) in the company of two musicians of Anekdoten and later in a new promising group of the name of Paatos…………………….

Line-up / Musicians
- Stefan Dimle / bass
- Reine Fiske / guitars
- Patric Helje / vocals
- Jonas Lindholm / drums
- Simon Nordberg / keyboards
- Sara Isaksson / vocals (7)
- Lotta Johansson / sax (1)
- Sebastian Öberg / cello (4)

Tracklist 1 Humanize 6:07
2 All Around Me 9:03
3 1st Of May 3:34
4 I Wish I Had A Boat 5:41
5 Dustgod 5:04
6 Dreamdance 4:49
7 Why Do I Still Sleep 7:55
8 Indian Summer 5:12 

johnkatsmc5, welcome music..