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3 Jun 2017

El Gusano “Fantasia Del Barrio” 1975 Texas Psych Rock Latin Funk Chicano Rock









El Gusano ‎ “Fantasia Del Barrio” 1975 very rare Texas  Psych Rock Latin Funk Chicano Rock
“Fantasia del Barrio” is the missing link between the Psychedelic sounds of Texas and the Chicano Soul and Funk of the late 1960′s and early 70′s. Recorded soon after Eugenio Jaimez returned from a tour of duty in Vietnam, “Fantasia del Barrio” is his musical meditation on life at war and the Chicano experience at home. Skillfully performed in one marathon recording session, Jaimez and El Gusano embraced the Soul, Funk and psychedelic sounds of their day to craft this lost instrumental concept album..............

Romantic rendezvous for a Montague newly arrived in San Antonio and his Laredo-born Capulet occurred more than halfway between the two Hispanic outposts for yours truly nearly 20 years ago. Who knew that highway overpass we met under in Cotulla ran through the hometown of one Eugenio Jaimez? Wounded in Vietnam and still suffering that trauma today in Laredo, the sexagenarian stringed-instrument-maker dances again through his 1975 musical autobiography, Fantasia del Barrio. Recorded in one 10-hour session in the Alamo City – 10 tracks cut in single takes on an 8-track recorder, with overdubs – the LP's Cotulla quartet of guitarist Jaimez, drummer Sonny Ramirez and his 14-year-old, bass-playing brother Ruben, plus sax man Carlos Salazar, swings raza rock. An original record jacket inscription by Jaimez describes Fantasia del Barrio as "remembrance of a hellish war that many of our brothers met with by chance," and his instrumental arc from agricultural beginnings ("Work Your Hand to the Bone") to Vietnam ("Pleiku") and back ("Going Home") reverberates in the here and now. The bulbous bass of opener "Bone" and the frontman's nonaggro sting hum a tune tickled by psychedelic effects, "Journey of the Mind" succeeding with a dramatic march of inner psych and outré riffs. Exotic interlude "Pleiku" gives way to "Juan Tutri 10pm," a Cotulla bar recalled with a ripe, warm musical matte of beer, botanas, and belly-rubbing. Side two coalesces Santo & Johnny ("Melancolia"), ghosts of Woodstock ("Going Home"), and the heavy Asian accents of "Road to Nirvana," which recalls Alice Cooper's "I'm Eighteen" lumbering elephantine to The Jungle Book. Boosting the record's initial run from 300 to 1,000, Austin preservationists Heavy Light Records relive Fantasia del Barrio on vinyl much like 2009 local breakout Don't Let Me Fall by West Dallas congregation the Relatives, both featuring contextualization by Chronicle musicologist Thomas Fawcett. Slight at just under 23 minutes, like sketches for a more in-depth work, its author notes contemporarily, "I think that we should have been more disciplined and less plastered." Don't you believe it. Ghetto dreams are sober enough........BY RAOUL HERNANDEZ,.....................

Fantasia del Barrio is a musical interpretation of expressions and experiences that are felt when one lives there. It is dedicated to the people who year after year journey away from their home to attain better well being for their families. It is about those who wrap themselves in dreams in search of reality. It’s a remembrance of a hellish war that many of our brothers met with by chance. It is also a request about the wants and needs of a people. Their happiness, sadness, downfalls and triumphs. It is in the end for the friends of the world who want to live at peace with themselves.”

– Eugenio “Gene” Jaimez, from the original LP jacket

Nearly 9,000 miles separate Cotulla, Texas from the lush tropical mountains of the Binh Dinh province along the south central coast of Vietnam. For Eugenio “Gene” Jaimez, the small town of Cotulla, which lies halfway between San Antonio and the Mexican border, was home. Like so many young men plucked from their reality and thrust into surreality, Gene was drafted into a psychedelic war at the age of 19. He spent Christmas of 1966 not at the Catholic church where he served as an altar boy growing up, but at a military landing zone along the Kim Son River in Binh Dinh.

At 1 a.m. on December 27, the relative calm of a holiday truce was punctured by the crackling of gunfire. Hundreds of North Vietnamese soldiers breached the perimeter of the U.S. landing zone dubbed LZ Bird. After 60 nightmarish minutes, more than 200 North Vietnamese soldiers lay dead. Of the 200 Americans, half were killed or seriously wounded. Shrapnel from a mortar round ruptured Gene’s abdomen, an injury from which he has never fully recovered.

“It was a bad scene for both sides which I don’t care to relive these days,” he says.

Fantasia del Barrio, a deeply personal work of instrumental introspection, is Gene’s meditation on the Vietnam War and the Chicano experience at home. On the original LP jacket from 1975, he dedicates the album to those “that want to live at peace with themselves,” a luxury he has never been afforded himself. The man who spearheaded El Gusano wielding a ‘66 Fender Stratocaster suffers from severe post-traumatic stress disorder. The resulting anxiety makes it difficult for Gene to meet new people and for this release he answered questions in writing, using his son as an intermediary.

After the injury at LZ Bird, Gene finished his tour of duty in Tokyo, Japan, stroking guitar with an R&B band of servicemen in his free time. “I played with a band of soul brothers. I believe the name of the band was The Sensations or something to that effect. We played mostly Joe Tex, Wilson Pickett, Otis Redding and such.”

Before and after the war, Gene played with local conjuntos, performing Tejano and Top 40 covers in bars from San Antonio to Laredo. A self-taught guitarist, he loved the Westside Sound of San Antonio ñ Sunny and the Sunliners, Freddie Fender, Dough Sahm, Sonny Ace – that reached Cotulla on the airwaves of KTSA and KONO, two of the only radio stations that could be picked up in town.

Born of casual jam sessions and a shared taste in music and recreational drugs, El Gusano formed in 1975. Fantasia del Barrio was Gene’s singular vision, an amalgamation of all the music he loved that somehow sounded like none of it. It was the conjunto of his childhood, the R&B he played in Tokyo and the rock and roll he heard on the radio all rolled into a stunning acid-induced concept record.

“We were all rock and rollers,” boasts El Gusano drummer Sonny Ramirez. “We dug our heritage and we loved Tejano music but if we had a choice we’d play rock and roll and blues.”

The strange brew didn’t convert many Cotullans. Most met the music with a mix of perplexity and disdain. ”When my daddy heard this album he was so pissed off, man,” Sonny said. Of course, his father had a vested interest. Sonny’s brother Ruben Ramirez, all of 14 years old at the time, played bass on the record. “Nobody understood what we were doing, nobody except the band and a few other friends. Everybody else was in their little conjunto world with their accordion and stuff like that, and we were outsiders.”

The band fit in fine at Juan Tutri 10 PM, the only Cotulla hangout that might pass for progressive. The album track named for that bohemian bar rides Gene’s breezy guitar melody and is the sunniest song on a sometimes melancholic journey; a happy sound for a happy place.

“We could go in there and do whatever we felt like doing and nobody would criticize us and people would just have fun and listen to us,” Sonny remembers.” We loved that little cantina.”

Juan Tutri 10 PM doubled as a meeting space for members of La Raza Unida Party (RUP), the Chicano political party birthed in nearby Crystal City. Before RUP rocked the status quo in 1970, Mexican Americans had no voice in local politics despite accounting for more than 70 percent of Cotulla’s population. Facing fierce resistance from the political establishment, RUP wrestled control of the city council in 1970 and won seats on the local school board. RUP candidate Afredo Zamora, Jr was elected mayor, defeating Paul Cotulla of the town’s founding family. By the time El Gusano recorded their ghetto fantasy, Raza Unida had lost momentum in much of the Lone Star State but Cotulla remained a stronghold.

“We weren’t like the Hells Angels or anti-American or anything like that,” Sonny explains. “We were just worried about our Hispanic base and about how we were being treated.”

The politics of the time manifest on album opener “Work Your Hand to the Bone,” a loping Minimoog funk jam for workers on every farm and in every factory. The track was recorded in 1975 at the studio of Joey Records in San Antonio as part of the ten-hour marathon session that spawned Fantasia del Barrio. The studio had just purchased a brand new 8-track recorder and, as luck would have it, El Gusano got to break it in. Every song was recorded in a single take, warts and all, with layers of percussion, synthesizers and accompaniment from a 12-string guitar added later.

“It was just a big old party, it wasn’t a disciplined session,” Sonny recalls. “We were there drinking and partying in the studio. We had practiced these songs so much that when we got into the studio the actual recording of it came easy. We made bologna sandwiches there, crashed, woke up and carried on. It was a fun time.”

Gene puts it more bluntly: “I think that we should have been more disciplined and less plastered.”

What the band lacked in sobriety it made up for with ingenuity, crafting high concept music with low budget instruments.

“Whenever you hear chimes on the record they aren’t actually chimes,” Sonny delights. “We were poor and our instruments were poor. I couldn’t afford any chimes. The studio at the time was going through some construction so I walked outside and found a bunch of nails and bolts and stuff like that. I tied them on a string and tied that to a coat hanger and made it into a chime, man! I even used a crowbar. I hung it by a string and was hitting it with a pair of pliers or a screwdriver.”

The band paid for a private pressing of 300 copies of Fantasia del Barrio. Distribution consisted of Gene, Sonny, Ruben and saxophonist Carlos Salazar handing out free copies to their friends. Only a handful of the original LPs were actually sold and fewer still are known to exist today. While El Gusano has remained virtually unknown, Fantasia del Barrio has earned Holy Grail status among the most dedicated diggers of psych and break records. In 2009, Austin musician and record collector Jason Chronis ended the long search for band members by locating Gene.

Sonny, 57, now lives in Victoria, about 40 miles from the Gulf Coast in southeast Texas where he works long hours as a salesman for a beer distributor. Gene, 63, has settled in Laredo and spends much of his time fashioning string instruments by hand. Among his creations are hybrids like the “dulcitar,” a melding of the guitar and dulcimer.

“I think I’ve always wanted to build my own instruments,” he says. “In fact, I might enjoy that more than making music. I’m limited in what I can construct since I only use a jigsaw, a hand drill, glue, sandpaper, stains and, of course, whatever suitable wood I come across.”

Sonny describes Gene’s creations as strange but beautiful. The same could be said for the music of Fantasia del Barrio and Gene’s hand drawn cover art depicting Plaza Florita, a landmark of Cotulla’s impoverished barrio. The plaza sits directly across the street from Welhausen School, a historically separate but unequal institution for the town’s Latino population where a young Lyndon B. Johnson served as teacher and principal from 1928-1929.

Moments before signing the Higher Education Act of 1965, President Johnson said, “I shall never forget the faces of the boys and the girls in that little Welhausen Mexican School, and I remember even yet the pain of realizing and knowing then that college was closed to practically every one of those children because they were too poor. And I think it was then that I made up my mind that this nation could never rest while the door to knowledge remained closed to any American.”

The plight of those living in Cotulla’s barrio sparked Johnson’s quest for social justice at home. As Gene Jaimez’ commander in chief, his decision to escalate the war in Vietnam changed one of those lives forever. Fantasia del Barrio was Gene’s musical therapy, an attempt to come to terms with the horrors he witnessed half a world away. For the rest of El Gusano it represented a journey beyond the confines of Cotulla.

“We were kids, kids that were learning our instruments and trying to escape from reality at the time,” Sonny says. “In Cotulla there was absolutely nothing. You went to school and then you worked on the ranches and that’s all you did. That music was our escape from reality.”

– Thomas Fawcett, September 2010, Austin, Texas.........................

This is one of the more obscure entries in the underground vinyl scene. The band formed in El Paso, TX in the early 70's, reportedly upon the return of the guitarist from a tour in Vietnam. They recorded their only album, which saw release in 1975, in a rumored press run of only 50 copies, and is now extremely rare. This is not a high energy affair. All of the tracks are instrumentals, incorporating guitar and some sax, in a very light setting. Present in the music are elements of folk, though most of the tracks feature a jazz-like flavor. I doubt if the reward for tracking down an original copy would seem worth the trouble for many listeners, especially now that a reissue has appeared. But the music is quite pleasant, though not spectacular by any means. The original vinyl was released on the Joey record label..........by.....tymeshifter ........

Tracklist
A1 Work Your Hand To The Bone
A2 Journey Of The Mind
A3 Pleiku
A4 Juan Tutri 10 PM
A5 Foot Stomper
B1 Do La Dog
B2 Melancolia
B3 Going Home
B4 Road To Nirvana
B5 Rockin' Rull

Cosa Nostra "Cosa Nostra" 1971 Mexico Heavy Psych Latin Funk








Cosa Nostra  "Cosa Nostra" 1971 Mexico Heavy Psych Latin Funk
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Incredibly talented, Latin-Funk Soul band with touches of psychedelia similar to that of early Parliament (Osmium period, mostly), Funkadelic with touches of the Mothers of Invention here and there. The only weak spot on the album was yet another version of Proud Mary (geesh, I think this one has been covered as many times as "MacArthur Park") which I could have done without, although it's inclusion was more or less there for "international recognition". Other than that, the rest of the album is fantastic......by.....tagomago ...........

Heavy duty rare Latin psych funk album, recorded in Mexico 1971. Their english language debut has heavy grooves right from the start, with hard guitar, bass, drums and organ kicking it and not letting up. Sounding a bit like Black Sugar if you can imagine U-Roy singing along with the rhythm tracks and some strangely dissonant background singers chiming in to boot..............

Can't seem to find anything about this obscure artifact and I can't even remember from where I found it, possibly from the blog linked below, and I am not even sure what motivated me to check it out. It's been on my hard drive for a little while and today I was inspired enough to keep it playing on the ipod throughout out the day. There is not a lot here to indicate the Mexican origins of this LP, except the groovy Latin number "I Like It like That". Apart from that, the rest of the album is pretty much psychedelic soul infused funk, and pretty good funk at that. with some strong tracks that make me want to move and some enjoyable blues tinged psychedelic guitar breaks giving it that late 60s vibe. Also a bit if an early disco vibe to some tracks. Not a particularly serious band as indicated by some of the silly lyrics sung with funny voices, which while works ok, I feel it takes away from the more serious musical passages. The other slight let down is the schmaltzy ballad "Memory of Your Touch", but this is the only real low point of this interesting platter. My rating for this one is gonna be .....................

Tracklist
A1 Get Down And Do It 6:29
A2 Memory Of Your Touch 3:37
A3 I Like It Like That 3:20
A4 Somebody Been Sleepin In My Bed 4:28
B1 Squeeze It Tight 6:08
B2 Proud Mary 3:58
B3 Cosa Nostra 5:11
B4 Change Of Mind 3:00 

2 Jun 2017

Perfume Azul do Sol “Nascimento"1974 masterpiece of Brazilian Psychedelia










Perfume Azul do Sol “Nascimento"1974 ultra rare masterpiece of Brazilian Psychedelia ..highly recommended…!
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The long-awaited reissue of this pearl of Brazilian psychedelia is coming, limited in only 500 copies by the Pedra Templo .................

2017 reissue, Brazilian import. Legendary psychedelic-prog-funk-rock LP from Brazil.....................

"A piece of the rainbow / To adorn your body / 20,000 rays of sun / To put in your hair". The hallucinogenic refrain that marks the third trip promised by lysergic acid diethylamide opens the spectacular Nascimento, a very rare album by the Brazilian singer Perfume Azul do Sol. The psychoactive wafer (finally) leaves the basement of Brazilian rock and wins a reissue on high fidelity vinyl in 180 grams.

The album reaches the new generations by the label Pedra Templo Animal (name derived from the classic Paêbiru, by Zé Ramalho and Lula Côrtes), in a very limited edition of 500 copies. And it will land in the few specialist stores from next week (February 20), although the re-launch party is scheduled for tomorrow (see details below).

Absolute classic of psychedelia, the 1974 disc is the only record of the ephemeral life group. Mixing progressive footprint, distorted guitars, dissonant poetry, northeastern rhythms and sullen piano chords, the original LP is one of the most exclusive of national discography. It is estimated that the Chantecler label printed about 150 copies of the album, which were distributed to the restricted group of friends close to the troupe.................

Grupo paulista formed by Ana (voice and piano), Benvindo (voice and guitar), Jean (voice and guitar) and Gil (drums and vocals). With hippy visuals and psychedelia derived from regional rhythms and instrumental, they recorded a single album - Nascimento -, by the label Chantecler, in 1974. The bassist Pedrão later integrated the Nosso Som de Cada Dia, alongside the ex-instable Manito. Perfume Azul do Sol is one of the many psychedelic rock bands from the Seventies that few people know about. Nascimento, of 1974, is at the same time his masterpiece and unique disc. The ten tracks, some on Ana's voice and piano, Benvindo's guitar, Jean on guitar and Gil on drums, were psychedelia-themed, but they did not offer a mix of instruments and styles of regional music, as can be heard in Band Abraço do Baião and also in Total Balance, The latter having all the characteristics of what was called "rural rock" at the time in question. One of the common places in some tracks of the disc is the well-known Fuzzbox pedal, that for good listener, never misses the bands of the decade, whether foreign or national, as well as arpeggios and small guitar solos. The lyrics of the songs are simple, but at the same time deep due to the subjectivity of the symbols, thus giving an air of mysticism, as much the letters as in the sound. The band that best expresses this idea is Canto Fundo, with its low strong and long introduction, tells us a maritime story that could very well be told by a pirate, theme also recurrent in other bands of the time, such as "The Pirate" of Ave Sangria and the 1979 album Pirata of the band A Barca do Sol. Closing the disc has the track The Supper, which is possibly the spoken description of a famous painting. The music has two atmospheres, the first bucolic, refers to ancient times with the help of the flute and little percussion. On the second they snore guitars on short solos, the low thunder and the drums go trotting to the end of the track. Despite the common points, all the bands added a bit in the history of Brazilian psychedelics, and in no way the repetition of themes or even with regard to the technique and way of playing, diminish the quality of what was created. The similarities at least contributed to mark a fertile and playful time musically speaking. Sentence Bands with Common Points: Impact Five, Bread with Butter, The Wolves, The Brazos, Imaginary Sound, Rubinho and Mauro Asumpção, Liverpool, Módulo 1000, Our Daily Sound and many others if you wanted to have lived then and to follow the pieces of bread that they left by the way...............

Little known, the band Perfume Azul Do Sol recorded their only album in 1974, by the label Chantecler. Its psychedelic sound mixes rock with regional music, like the baião. The immersion in this work is inevitable, something that causes us an almost mystical feeling. Formed by Benvindo (guitar), Jean (guitar), Ana (voice and guitar) and Gil (drums). Who plays bass on the record is Pedro Baldanza. He was a guest bassist to record, but it was never the band.

"Only a few copies have stopped in the hands of the band and rare retailers as a gift to the record company, an LP of that is worth a fortune for collectors." Comment from an anonymous former member.........................

Tracklist
A1 20000 Raios De Sol
A2 Sopro
A3 Calça Velha
A4 Deusa Sombria
A5 O Abraço Do Baião
B1 Equilíbrio Total
B2 Nascimento
B3 Pé De Inganzeira
B4 Canto Fundo
B5 A Ceia

The Hypnotic Eye "Optical Sound Of" 2013 UK Psych Rock






The Hypnotic Eye  "Optical Sound Of"  2013 UK Psych Rock
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London's Hypnotic Eye have impressed over the last year or so with a couple of memorable singles and a split 7" with the mighty John's Children for last year's Record Store Day. These early singles showed a mastery of the vintage sounding garage psych single, but while they'd proven themselves with a focused artform best suited to the three minute format, there was a nagging suspicion that the Hypnotic Eye might struggle when it came to putting out a full length. 
"The Optical Sounds of the Hypnotic Eye" casts these nagging doubts aside as they take ownership of this particular format with ease, forging what is not merely a selection of potential singles but a fully fledged and immaculately sequenced album with it's own internal logic that shows a versatility only hinted at on their single releases. 
Opener "The Man From The C.I.A" follows the same classic garage punk footprints as early singles "Marianne" and "Satisfaction" (both included here) with added sci-fi guitar breaks for good measure, but there's a moody undercurrent frequently at play here too, first hinted at on the jerky domestic drama of "Frying Pan" and milked for all it's worth on the percussive slo-mo organ fest of "The Dark Part of My Mind" which brings to mind the moody epics peppered throughout the early Doors LPs - a track that realizes that mindset is more important than length when it comes to establishing a work of gargantuan proportions. 
It's this effortless back and forth between primal garage beat, and moody, slow-burning epics - both rendered in only the most vintage of tones - that keeps the listener (me, anyway) on their toes, with plenty of grey areas between these two extremes also investigated herein. 
Highlights then? How about a gritty, authentic take on the Human Expression's "Readin' Your Will" which kicks off the album's impressive middle stretch with snotty attitude in spades and a strange, shimmering guitar part low in the mix that sounds like the sort of thing that early psychedelic pioneers who couldn't track down a sitar would knock up with a bit of studio ingenuity. What about the intricate guitar and organ interplay of "Action Woman"? Or the stampeding spy flick beat on the ridiculously catchy "Searching"? 
You get the picture. 
Visceral, and thrillingly authentic garage psych with enough contemporary awareness to pull in the casual punters too. Nice. .................by Nathan Ford................

Tracklist
The Man From The CIA
Frying Pan Death Witch Blues
Marianne
The Dark Part Of My Mind
Hey Joe
Readin' Your Will
Fly On The Wall
Satisfaction
Action Woman
Thought Machine
Searching
San Antonio Hunting Song

Wanderléa ‎ “Vamos Que Eu Já Vou” 1977 Brazil Pop Funk Fusion





Wanderléa ‎ “Vamos Que Eu Já Vou” 1977 Brazil Pop Funk Fusion
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discography…………
It is not clear to what extent it may or may not be interesting for an artist to be stereotyped by walking only in one direction throughout his career. 
Wanderléa, with this album, exorcised once and for all the image of “Ternurinha”, in a versatile and vigorous album. 

The album is the work of the period in which she was married to the multifaceted Egberto Giismonti and by the amount of synthesizers and experiments, there is no doubt that this work was signed by him, 

This was the ninth album of the singer’s career, and it was the size of the experiment, seen in tracks like “Calypso”, the singer actually singing a song with all the characteristics of this musical genre, strolling through the virtuosity of the track “Before the City Durma ”(which features a belly [guitar solo by Altay Veloso, abusing the distortions]), the romantic" Things of Life “, Dance Mineira (which is a clear demonstration of the African congado) and the title track that is simply Contagious and shows the vocal potential of the singer in a broken and surprising harmony; Among other tracks. 

Wanderléa proves in this work that it deserves to be among the great female voices in the history of our music, only for this album; This is very clear …………. 

A very beautiful and very rich record in the arrangements, due to the presence of the master Egberto Gismonti taking care of this part and also playing several instruments. It was the rest of the team that is practically the same as the album Carmo do Gismonti already posted here on the blog ie: Robertinho and Luiz Alvez do Som Imaginário in the kitchen with the help of the super bassist Waldeci Ney who played the second lineup of Black Rio Band with his Electric bass full of slaps and effects contrasting with the acoustic bass of Luiz and more Ubiratan in the percussion and Altay Veloso that besides great guitarist is a super composer and helped with 3 songs that are perhaps the best of the LP. 

The disc has a mix of various rhythms, funk, progressive rock, calypso, samba, baião among other things, highly recommending. 

Forget about the pop and behaved little girl from the time of the Jovem Guarda and enjoy this beautiful album………….. 

Mùsicos: 

Egberto Gismonti - Teclados, pianos, violão e arranjos 
Robertinho Silva - Bateria, Percussão 
Luis Alves - Baixo 
Valdecir - Guitarra 
Altay Veloso - Guitarra 
Ubiratan - Percussão 

Tracklist 
01 - A terceira força 
(Erasmo Carlos - Roberto Carlos) 
02 - Poema para Léa 
(Paulo Diniz - Juhareiz Correya) 
03 - Antes que a cidade durma 
(Altay Veloso) 
04 - Calypso 
(Egberto Gismonti - Geraldo Carneiro) 
05 - Coisas da vida 
(Rosinha de Valença) 
06 - Café 
(Egberto Gismonti) 
07 - Vamos que eu já vou 
(Altay Veloso) 
08 - Carmo 
(Egberto Gismonti - Geraldo Carneiro) 
09 - A felicidade bate a sua porta 
(Gonzaguinha) 
10 - Educação sentimental 
(Egberto Gismonti - Geraldo Carneiro) 
11 - Relva verde 
(Altay Veloso) 
12 - Dança mineira 
(Aécio Flávio - Tibério Gaspar) 

“A TERCEIRA FORÇA” 

Piano e Sintetizadores – Egberto 
Baixo Elétrico – Waldecir 
Bateria – Robertinho 
Percussão – Ubiratan 
Guitarra – Altay 
Coro – Golderança 
Arranjo e Orquestração – Egberto 
Regência – Gaya 


“POEMA PARA LÉA” 

Piano – Egberto 
Baixo Elétrico – Waldecir 
Bateria – Robertinho 
Guitarra – Altay 
Coro – Golderança 
Arranjo e Regência – Egberto 


“ANTES QUE A CIDADE DURMA” 

Violão Solo c/ Bi-Phase 
jue Distortion, Piano 
Elétrico e 
Sintetizadores – Egberto 
Guitarra – Altay 
Baixo Elétrico c/ Funk 
Machine – Waldecir 
Baixo Elétrico – Luiz Alves 
Bateria – Robertinho 
Percussão – Ubiratan 
Arranjo e Orquestração – Egberto 
Regência – Gaya 


“CALYPSO” 

Kalimba, Tonton e 
Sintetizadores – Egberto 
Bateria – Robertinho 
Agogô – Luiz Alves 
Xequerê – Ubiratan 
Arranjo – Egberto 


“COISAS DA VIDA” 

Violão, Piano e 
Sintetizador – Egberto 
Guitarra – Altay 
Baixo Elétrico – Waldecir 
Bateria – Robertinho 
Percussão – Ubiratan 
Arranjo e Orquestração – Egberto 
Regência – Gaya 


“CAFÉ” 

Violão e Piano – Egberto 
Baixo Acústico – Luiz Alves 
Bateria – Robertinho 
Cuíca – Marçal 
Arranjo e Orquestração – Egberto 
Regência – Gaya 


“VAMOS QUE EU JÁ VOU” 

Violão Solo c/ Bi-Phase 
e Distortion 
e Sintetizadores – Egberto 
Guitarra – Altay 
Baixo Elétrico c/ Funk 
Machine – Waldecir 
Baixo Elétrico – Luiz Alves 
Bateria – Robertinho 
Percussão – Ubiratan 
Coro – Golderança 
Arranjo e Orquestração – Egberto 
Regência – Gaya 


“CARMO” 

Violão, Piano e 
Percussão – Egberto 
Baixo Acústico – Luiz Alves 
Bateria – Robertinho 
Arranjo e Orquestração – Egberto 
Regência – Gaya 


“A FELICIDADE BATE A SUA PORTA” 

Violão Solo c/ Bi-Phase 
e Distortion 
e Sintetizadores – Egberto 
Guitarra – Altay 
Baixo Elétrico – Waldecir 
Bateria – Robertinho 
Arranjo – Egberto 


“EDUCAÇÃO SENTIMENTAL” 

Viola 12 cordas, 
Viola 10 cordas, 
solo, e 
Sintetizador – Egberto 

Baixo Elétrico – Waldecir 
Bateria – Robertinho 
Percussão – Ubiratan 
Arranjo – Egberto 
Guitarra – Altay 


“RELVA VERDE” 

Violão, Escaleta e 
Piano Elétrico – Egberto 
Guitarra – Altay 
Baixo Elétrico – Waldecir 
Baixo Acústico – Luiz Alves 
Bateria – Robertinho 
Percussão – Ubiratan 
Flauta Solo – Meirelles 
Arranjo e Orquestração – Egberto 
Regência – Gaya 


“DANÇA MINEIRA” 

Violão, Tonton 
e Sintetizador – Egberto 
Baixo Acústico – Luiz Alves 
Baixo Elétrico – Waldecir 
Guitarra – Altay 
Bateria, Berimbau 
e Agogô – Robertinho 
Bacia e Pandeiro – Ubiratan 
Coro – Golderança 
Arranjo – Egberto  

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