Saturday, 9 September 2017

Can "Edinburgh International"Festival 1973 (bootleg) Germany Kraut Rock Experimental




Can "Edinburgh International"Festival 1973 (bootleg) Germany Kraut Rock Experimental

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Good soundboard recording of 'Future Days' era Can. this was to be Damo Suzuki's last live performance with the band.
Concert album of the Germans Can, recorded in 1973 at the Edinburgh International Festival-1973 - the annual festival of scenic arts in Edinburgh (Scotland), which is listed in the Guinness Book of Records as the largest in the world.....

Holger Czukay – bass, double bass
Michael Karoli – guitar, violin
Jaki Liebezeit – drums, percussion
Irmin Schmidt – keyboards, synthesizers
Damo Suzuki – vocals, percussion

Tracklist

01. Soup
02. Bel Air

Ablution "Ablution" 1974 Sweden Prog Jazz Rock Fusion


Ablution  "Ablution" 1974 Sweden Prog Jazz Rock Fusion
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 This obscure seven-piece band cut their sole album in Sweden, 1974, John Gustafson (bass) and Pete Robinson (Keybords) were two Englishmen that had worked together earlier in the UK prog rock trio Quatermass (1970). Ablution plays a very average kind of jazz-rock fusion that can't stick into my mind.Their playing is solid enough, particularly the combination of the flute and the percussion is strong and adds a latin flavor to their sound. Typical of this era we also hear elements of funk here and there, but overall nothing memorable. As I know it never came out on cd, so the vinyl copies may be expensive too. So, don't look around for it, except if you are deep into Jazz Rock....by...PROGNATURE BEAST.........

 After Sonic Youth's Washing Machine, comes Ablution (cover art joke, laughter please).
Ahhh, the swedish music. From Ace of Base to Entombed, from ABBA to Dan Swano projects, I love it. This is Ablution first and last. This isn't a miss. Otherwise, a great jazz/fusion full filled with good solos and a variety of instruments. Mainly Peter Robinson (later in Brand X) keyboards, are very pleasent for me. The violent flutist is very remarkable. From the first song, they show what they got, with awesome keys riffage, percurssion, guitar solo, flute, trumpet, all fused into a stylish rhythm. There is some avant gardish presence at this album, and some dissonant chords. This is the kind of music that if you press "play" you won't stop until it reaches the end....by Votoms......


The only self-titled record of Anglo-Swedish musicians was released in 1974. The work is a continuation of the same short-term project Baltik. By composition of musicians just a supergroup. Pete Robinson played Quatermass and Brand X, John Gustafson -Quatermass, Roxy Music, Bryan Ferry, Ian Gillan, Jesus Christ Superstar. Swedish part: Jayson Lindh is known for a number of solo works, and Jan Schaffer, Ola Bunkett and Mellando Gassama were shown in ABBA. Contemporaries called Ablution the Swedish answer to Santana, also there were comparisons with the Weather Report and, especially, Return To Forever. Musical structures line up around guitar exercises with a virtuoso flute. A kind of dispute of guitar and flute. The work is completely instrumental. A significant place is given to Latin American percussion and constantly attacking percussion. Keyboards (electropiano, organ and synthesizer) are not dominant, but just add strokes to the overall favorable picture. In general, the music is fast and virtuosic, with spasmodic passages and not boring alternately soloing the guitar and flute. Remarkable work of outstanding musicians..


It's easy to hear that these guys are real professionals. The instrumental work is tremendous through the whole album. While the compositions might not be anything groundbreaking and mindblowing this album is still a very nice listen because the band sounds fantastic. The record is totally instrumental and overall this is a very consistent package of jazzy prog rock. Some complex avant-prog influences can be found as well and they bring some diversity to the material. 

I like this S/T Ablution album pretty much and I'm gonna rate it with four stars. But four stars is the highest rating I could think of giving because 4,5 would clearly be too much. If you enjoy complex progressive rock with lots of jazz influences you should give this one a listen.....by.....CooperBolan ..


A short-lived group which was a continuation of Baltik. Ablution let more Latin influences into their music than Baltik, and almost became the Swedish version of Santana and Titanic. They also had strong bonds with contemporary instrumental jazz-rock (Return To Forever and Weather Report). 

Schaffer and Lindh eventually became two of the most famous Swedish studio musicians (Schaffer even with Abba) and they also recorded solo albums....


Line-up / Musicians

- John Gustavsson / bass
- Barry De Souza, Ola Brunkert / drums
- Björn J:son Lindh / flute, piano
- Janne Schaffer / guitar
- Pete Robinson / keyboards
- Malando Gassama, Ola Brunkert / percussion
- Barry De Souza / trumpet

Songs / Tracks Listing

1. Bluegaloo (6:25)
2. Woodchurch Sorceress (1:50)
3. Kokt Tvätt (5:51)
4. The Nard Finished Third (7:08)
5. Equator (5:51)
6. Third Meter Stroll (6:40)
7. The Visitor (9:54) 

The Move “The BBC Sessions” 1998 UK Psych Garage Rock


The Move “The BBC Sessions”  1998 UK Psych Garage Rock
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https://vk.com/wall312142499_6863

This is exactly the same collection (in content and accuracy), like the semi-legal Black Country Rock compilation on Gold Standard, for the lack of, perhaps, one of the best songs - cover for Simon & Garfunkel's "The Sounds of Silence." 
The album features 25 items, 10 of them were recorded live during the run of their original material in the BBC studio in the 60's. Among them are the hits "Night of Fear," "Fire Brigade," "Flowers in the Rain," "I Can Hear the Grass Grow," and "Blackberry Way." 
More interesting from the historical point of view are 16 covers, representing an eclectic set of compositions that are included in the repertoire of any large group of the time -the Byrds, Tim Rose, Love, Jerry Lee Lewis, Eddie Cochran, Neil Diamond, Jackie Wilson, Janis Joplin, Johnny Cash, Moby Grape, and the Beach Boys. Their version on the Byrds '"Goin' Back" is especially sharp and interesting. 
The album is recommended to serious fans of the group, this audience could hardly wish for the best collection from the rarities of the early days of The Move......

- Bev Bevan - drums, vocals (1965-1972, 2004-2014)
- Roy Wood - guitar, keyboards, saxophone, flute, bass, vocals (1965-1972)
- Carl Wayne - vocals, bass, guitar (1965-1969; died 2004)
- Trevor Burton - guitar, bass, vocals (1965-1969, 2007-2014)
- Ace Kefford - bass, vocals (1965-1968)
- Rick Price - bass, vocals (1969-1971)
- Jeff Lynne - guitar, piano, vocals (1970-1972)

1. Night of fear from "BBC Sessions"
2. Going back - BBC Sessions
3. Higher and higher - BBC Sessions
4. Open my eyes (favorite song) from "Shazam" (2016 version with bonus tracks) Also, "The ultimate rare tracks" album, 2017. Note: Both albums also have Sound of silence.
5. Piece of my heart This is an up an beat version recorded from Top of the Pops in 1968. I haven't been able to source it elsewhere. Ideas welcome. (The version on "BBC Sessions" is much slower)

Triode “On N'a Pas Fini D'avoir Tout Vu” 1971 France Prog Rock


Triode “On N'a Pas Fini D'avoir Tout Vu” 1971 France Prog  Rock
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Orange LP version. Limited edition of 200. Souffle Continu presents the sixth release in its series of reissues from the catalog of the cult French underground Futura label. Triode was a French psych prog band from the early '70s. Their sole album, 1971's On n'a pas fini d'avoir tout vu, combines the fascinating flute playing of Michel Edelin, the psychedelic guitar sound of Pierre Chérèze (also of YS and a collaborator of Bernard Szajner), and the groovy rhythm section of Didier Hauck and Pierre-Yves Sorin. Triode plays a more jazzy kind of instrumental prog with fascinating flute interludes. The psychedelic sound of the guitar combined with brilliant flute chops gives overall an excellent example of how great and imaginative were the bands in the '70's in progressive rock movement. The album is up tempo, not a single piece is weak, nice musicianship show a band in great form, but with all that they remain totaly unknown to larger public, even in prog circles is kinda forgotten. This instrumental jazzy prog monster is finally available again in its original form. This is the album's first official vinyl reissue, fully licensed by Futura founder Gérard Terronès. Presented in a 350-gram matte sleeve with obi strip. Limited edition of 500.....


Chiefly the vehicle of flautist Michel Edelin, Triode were of that light instrumental pop-jazz underground genre that you hear in lots of films from the era but never seem to find albums of. Triode's main claim to fame, however, is the much-travelled and talented guitarist Pierre Cherez (also of Ys, and later the guitar whiz with Bernard Szajner). Their drummer Didier Hauck was ex-Ergo Sum, and he held together a very tight band. 
There's only one word to describe Triode's sole album, and that is "groovy" - it's definitely of the era (12 April 1971 to be exact), and I'd compare it to the likes of Mel Collins' band Circus and Wolfgang Dauner's Rischka's Soul above all else. It's the nimble drums, quirky jazz elements and that oh-so-cool flute that get the feet tapping and body swaggering to it, whether you want to or not. And then there's Cherez, who seems to adopt a different style with each track. His strumming is correctly compared to Caravan's Pye Hastings on the cover notes, yet he also freak's-out when he wants to. There's also a sizzling instrumental version of Lennon & McCartney's Come Together with the flute taking-over the vocal role....by....ultimathulerecords ..


Triode is a total obscure and forgotten french psych prog band from early 70's who manage to release a sole album in 1971 named On N'a Pas Fini D'avoir Tout Vu at Futura label. The album will be released on CD by Mellow records almost 30 years later. The album is instrumental entirely dominated by excellent flute playing by Michel Edelin, who will please fans of progressive music for sure, the similarity is with of course Jethro Tull or some bands from canterbury from that period, maybe early Caravan or Traffic for ex, but Triode playes a more jazzy kind of instrumental prog with fascinating flute interludes.The psychedelic sound of the guitar combined with brilliant flute chops gives overall an excellent example of how great and imaginative were the bands in the '70's in progressive rock movement. The album is up tempo, not a single piece is weak, nice musicianship, specialy on opening track Magic Flower, Moulos Grimpos, Blahsha or the cover of Beatles - Come together show a band in big form, but with all that they remain totaly unknown to larger public, even in prog circles is kinda forgotten. 

Highly recommended !!!.....music_emporium


 4.75 stars really. One of those hidden gems from the not yet totally discovered French jungle (this one dates back from 71) it was released on the Futura Label (only five or six albums before extinction) . The common error that most review makes is to mention Jethro Tull just because there is a flute. Ofr course there is a bit of that but also much more. Of real interest is a cover of one of my fave Beatles number Come Together but instrumental . Yes sir! Instrumental! Great interplay with all the musicians makes this album a valuable pearl to you would sorry to miss out on.... by Sean Trane ...


 Some well played fusion hailing from France here! The flute player apparently studied under Ian Anderson and its apparent once you hit track 4! Michel Edelin is just as good as the master and adds his own interesting twists. I would say Triode is a mix between Tull, Focus and Yezda Urfa (I mention YU as it is fast paced and energetic). Be sure to check out this rare gem any way you can!...by Carl floyd fan ......


 Triode is a total obscure and forgotten french psych prog band from early 70's who manage to release a sole album in 1971 named On N'a Pas Fini D'avoir Tout Vu at Futura label. The album will be released on CD by Mellow records almost 30 years later. The album is instrumental entirely dominated by excellent flute playing by Michel Edelin, who will please fans of progressive music for sure, the similarity is with of course Jethro Tull or some bands from canterbury from that period, maybe early Caravan or Traffic for ex, but Triode playes a more jazzy kind of instrumental prog with fascinating flute interludes.The psychedelic sound of the guitar combined with brilliant flute chops gives overall an excellent example of how great and imaginative were the bands in the '70's in progressive rock movement. The album is up tempo, not a single piece is weak, nice musicianship, specialy on opening track Magic Flower, Moulos Grimpos, Blahsha or the cover of Beatles - Come together show a band in big form, but with all that they remain totaly unknown to larger public, even in prog circles is kinda forgotten. I will give 4 stars for sure, excellent ex of early french prog, with a lot to offer, nice cover art btw, one of my fav from prog. Recommended... by b_olariu ..


 TRIODE were a French band who released this album back in 1971.This is an instrumental record with no keyboards which intrigued me to say the least. The flute and fuzzed out guitar takes turns leading the way (mostly flute though) while the bass, percussion and drums support. I must admit that this album didn't really remind me of any band in particular, this is just good intrumental music. 
"Magic Flower" is bass, drum and flute led early. I like the drumming after 2 minutes. Just a great sounding opener. "Misomaque" is more uptempo and dynamic as the drums, bass and guitar lead before the flute joins in. Guitar to the fore 2 minutes in to end it. 

"Moulos Grimpos" opens with bass and drums and it's laid back. Flute joins in as it stays mellow. Some fuzzed out guitar after 2 minutes. "Blasha" is uptempo with bass and drums before the flute and guitar join in.The guitar lights it up before 2 1/2 minutes then the flute returns before 4 minutes. 

"Lilie" is a groovy number with some far out flute while the drums and bass support.The guitar replaces the flute after 2 1/2 minutes then the flute returns before 4 minutes. "Ibiza Flight" has a good bass intro as the drums help out.Guitar and flute then join the party. A guitar solo after 2 minutes that lasts a minute then it settles back. It picks up again late. 

"Adeubis" is a short flute led piece. I do like when the guitar comes in though before a minute. "Come Together" is THE BEATLES track that they have covered. Interesting to hear that flute-voice-over early on in this instrumental version. I like the fuzzed out guitar after 2 minutes and later before 4 minutes. 

"Chimney Suite" is by far the longest track at under 9 minutes. Flute,percussion and bass lead as the guitar joins in quickly. Flute leads after 3 1/2 minutes then the guitar returns after 5 1/2 minutes and proceeds to rip it up.The flute is back leading before 7 minutes. 

4 stars and well worth that rating....by Mellotron Storm .


 The sole album by this enigmatic quartet finds them wearing their Jethro Tull influence on their sleeve, with Michel Edelin's flute work and the performances of the rest of the band highly reminiscent of the band's early work as documented on Living In the Past. The major difference here is that Triode are a vocal-free unit, delivering a suite of all-instrumental flute-based prog numbers (though listeners will have trouble not singing along to the cover of the Beatles' Come Together). So, the social commentary and lyrical wit which you might usually associate with Tull is set aside, and the performers add additional layers of complexity to their playing in order to fill the gap. Worth a go unless you really don't like flutes in your prog. ....by Warthur ....


Short-lived quartet from Paris, gathered around flutist Michel Edelin, guitarist Pierre Chereze, bassist Pierre-Yves Sorin and drummer Didier Hauck.Triode were around since 1970 and they recorded their debut at the Studio Europa Sonor in Paris sometime in 1971.The album was titled ''On n'a pas fini d'avoir tout vu'' and was released on the Futura label. 
With no singer in the picture Triode played an attractive instrumental Progressive Rock, which was equally showered by psychedelic and jazzy influences, fronted by a tireless Michel Edelin on flute and the effective, accompanying team of Chereze, Sorin and Hauck.The music is trully interesting, sometimes loose and sometimes pretty tight, with many flute solos in the vein of JETHRO TULL and some furious guitar plays, while the rhythm section is especially great during the fast paces.There are even some mellow parts with a bluesy sound and a more apparent folky color in the flute lines, which sound a bit outdtated.The focus here is on the dense pieces with the solid instrumental interactions, the freedom of Jazz in the accurate and well-executed solos and the complicated, very technical rhythm section.Incredible bass work by Sorin and frenetic drumming by Hauck complete a splendid effort of passionate instrumental Rock exhibition.Plenty of Chereze's guitar moves have a definite JAN AKKERMAN touch and certain references to FOCUS' more jazzy moments, but I guess the man had never heard of the Dutch neighbours then, we are talking about early-70's here after all.Especially nice are also some sweet interplays with a bit of melodious leanings in the process, a different side of an otherwise quite jamming band. 

Triode disbanded in 1972 with Edelin releasing some personal efforts and establishing the Michel Edelin Trio/Quartet, Chereze released numerous singles and albums as a solo artist, while Pierre-Yves Sorin played as a session man next to huge names of Jazz Music and eventually teamed up again with drummer Didier Hauck on Jazz Sextet. 

Freaked-out Jazz/Psych Rock with tons of flute and electric guitar moves, sounds pretty jamming for today's standards, but this was certainly a pretty fascinating album back at the time.Strongly recommended...3.5 stars....by apps79 ...



 Your pet's fave 
One of the most delightful and charming little albums you're ever likely to come across, Triode's sole album is the sort of album that washes your hair before it sings gently in your ear. 

With a flute song from distant gardens and a genuine feel of 1970s nostalgia with twinkling cymbals, wooden congas and a slow coarse guitar that sweeps its way through the music like a janitor on acid, - the music filling up your room is one of slow hazy psychedelia lead jazz rock. Every time I play this one, I get the feeling of sitting on a heather shrouded meadow with all kinds of freaky people hanging around on the grass - eating fruits, grooming beards, jumping through fiery hoops, making love in trees and generally just having a funky good old time with everything. This music is being played continuously from up on high, where small midgety folks have decorated the forest treetop line with dozens of Bose speakers. It gives off a certain frivolous kitchen-party-in-the-rough kind of feel, and instantly makes people feel better about their lives, what they're doing with it, and perhaps moreover forget everything nasty in it. Triode feed off your willingness to become one with your lawn, and while not far off Jethro Tull's bluesy flute rock debut - this one seems altogether more with it - in tune with the times surrounding it. Sure it sounds like it was made in 69 with all the bluesyness of the guitars and bass licks, yet the nicely recorded percussions as well as the delicate and jazzy flute make this thing into something timeless. 

I like to listen to this at parties, where I sneak in with my I-pod and wait for people's incompetence to play music continuously, and then swooof like a great big leopard I swoop over the controls and let this wonderful chill, saucy, funky, warm, electric, sweaty, jazzy, bluesy and earthy like the very colour of its cover art - music roll over the unsuspecting crowd. 

There is indeed something earthy about Triode. An immense musical root network which has buried its feet deep beneath the surface of the soil........... Maybe that's why I always get these hippie images of heathers and people partying on lawns with this thing? Either way, it's the single most alluring part of this album - that warm, earthy feel permeating it. 

I played this to my black bird friend I've named Charlie. He sits in the highest pine tree in my folks' garden. Come noon he'll be tooting his horn about whatever it is that birds talk about (Flying methods and possible readjustments perhaps?), and here the other day I had this album playing from a small pair of MP3 speakers resting cosily in an Agave cactus. The moods of the flute seemed to interest him, and at one point I was under the impression that he threw a spastic fit, during a flute spitting manoeuvre of one of the more rocking sections - completely out of his head jumping halfway down the branch - collecting himself enough to jumble back on top of it with an intensive and life invigorating PEEEEP - the likes I normally only hear when there's brown feathered women about him.

So there you have it. This album is so good, it naturally attracts different species. Just think about what amazing get togethers you could throw, if you would be able to expect giraffes and squirrels attending. .....
 by Guldbamsen ...


On N'a Pas Fini D'Avoir Tout Vu is an instrumental album with a strong flute presence that might have an immediate attraction for Jethro Tull fans, although both the music and the flute playing show more of a jazzy Canterbury vibe (think of early Caravan). Other bands that come to mind during some passages are Gravy Train (first album) or Traffic. In addition to the virtuoso flute playing, there are some great psych guitar leads. There is also a flute-drenched cover of the Beatles track, "Come together". Anyone with an interest in flute-dominated music should have this album....... Gnosis ....


Triode was an excellent and obscure French band of eclectic prog of the early 70s, even totally forgotten, that managed to release a single album in 1971, called "On N'a Pas Fini D'avoir Tout Vu", produced by Futura Records (French label focused on jazz, very active in the 70's). 

In 2001, thirty years later, Mellow Records brought the work to its well-deserved evidence, gaining prominence in the progressive general segments, receiving the best accolades from the specialized critic. 
   
The album is instrumental, mainly conducted by the excellent flutist Michel Edelin, who in the future would be consecrated as one of the legends in this instrument, quoted in the "Dictionary of Jazz" (Laffond), as one of "The Great Creators of Jazz", authentic a jazz-flute specialist, one of four on the Jazz Hot Prize list (alongside Dave Valentin, James Moody and Sonny Fortune). 

Under the progressive scenario, Triode is often compared to Jethro Tull (Ian Anderson's flute, mostly), some bands from the Canterbury scene of the same period, such as Caravan or Traffic, or even Focus and Yezda Urfa. The fact is that Triode represents a jazzy instrumental prog with fascinating flute interludes, which becomes even more eclectic due to the psychedelic sound of Pierre Chereze's guitar, undoubtedly is another great exponent in this album, and is a prime example of how creative were the bands of '70, in the progressive rock movement. 

The album is uniform, all the songs are good, and what strikes the most attention is being an instrumental record without keyboards, the flute and the fuzzed guitar take turns in the lead, while Pierre Yves Sorin's great bass, percussion and battery of Didier Hauck, give the support with a lot of quality. Another pearl of the progressive. Good hearing!......



One of the most delightful and charming little albums you're ever likely to come across, Triode's sole album is the sort of album that washes your hair before it sings gently in your ear. 

With a flute song from distant gardens and a genuine feel of 1970s nostalgia with twinkling cymbals, wooden congas and a slow coarse guitar that sweeps its way through the music like a janitor on acid, - the music filling up your room is one of slow hazy psychedelia lead jazz rock. Every time I play this one, I get the feeling of sitting on a heather shrouded meadow with all kinds of freaky people hanging around on the grass - eating fruits, grooming beards, jumping through fiery hoops, making love in trees and generally just having a funky good old time with everything. This music is being played continuously from up on high, where small midgety folks have decorated the forest treetop line with dozens of Bose speakers. It gives off a certain frivolous kitchen-party-in-the-rough kind of feel, and instantly makes people feel better about their lives, what they're doing with it, and perhaps moreover forget everything nasty in it. Triode feed off your willingness to become one with your lawn, and while not far off Jethro Tull's bluesy flute rock debut - this one seems altogether more with it - in tune with the times surrounding it. Sure it sounds like it was made in 69 with all the bluesyness of the guitars and bass licks, yet the nicely recorded percussions as well as the delicate and jazzy flute make this thing into something timeless. 

I like to listen to this at parties, where I sneak in with my I-pod and wait for people's incompetence to play music continuously, and then swooof like a great big leopard I swoop over the controls and let this wonderful chill, saucy, funky, warm, electric, sweaty, jazzy, bluesy and earthy like the very colour of its cover art - music roll over the unsuspecting crowd. 

There is indeed something earthy about Triode. An immense musical root network which has buried its feet deep beneath the surface of the soil........... Maybe that's why I always get these hippie images of heathers and people partying on lawns with this thing? Either way, it's the single most alluring part of this album - that warm, earthy feel permeating it. 

I played this to my black bird friend I've named Charlie. He sits in the highest pine tree in my folks' garden. Come noon he'll be tooting his horn about whatever it is that birds talk about (Flying methods and possible readjustments perhaps?), and here the other day I had this album playing from a small pair of MP3 speakers resting cosily in an Agave cactus. The moods of the flute seemed to interest him, and at one point I was under the impression that he threw a spastic fit, during a flute spitting manoeuvre of one of the more rocking sections - completely out of his head jumping halfway down the branch - collecting himself enough to jumble back on top of it with an intensive and life invigorating PEEEEP - the likes I normally only hear when there's brown feathered women about him. 

So there you have it. This album is so good, it naturally attracts different species. Just think about what amazing get togethers you could throw, if you would be able to expect giraffes and squirrels attending....


Line-up / Musicians 
- Pierre Chereze / guitars 
- Pierre Yves Sorin / bass 
- Didier Hauck / drums 
- Michel Edelin / flute


 Songs / Tracks Listing 
1. Magic Flower (5:32) 
2. Misomaque (2:58) 
3. Moulos Grimpos (4:06) 
4. Blahsha (4:20) 
5. Lilie (4:50) 
6. Ibiza Flight (4:49) 
7. Adeubis (2:44) 
8. Come Together (4:46) 
9. Chimney Suite (8:54)


Akasha "Akasha" 1977 Norway Prog Space Art Rock


Akasha  "Akasha" 1977 Norway Prog Space Art Rock

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 AKASHA is a Norwegian quintet who recorded one strange and fascinating album back in 1977. They are: Kjell Evensen on drums; Arild Andreasson on bass; Jens-Ivar Andreassen on guitar, mellotron, synths, piano and organ; Tor Johnny Hansen is credited for lyrics on one particular track; and Sverre Svendsen handles the mellotron as well as the English vocals - highly reminiscent of Greg LAKE, by the way. Musically speaking, comparisons aren't easy: try to imagine a blend of early GENESIS and the MOODY BLUES, albeit a much harsher, stranger version of the latter. AKASHA write dark and foreboding prog and lyrics with a strong sci-fi bent. The LP version of their album is now a collectors' item, commanding 3-digit prices on the underground market; even the small Swedish label (APM) that issued its cd version in 1995 has now ceased to be. 

The music on their self-titled album (which dons an epic 11-minute opener) is loaded with synths, mellotron and spacey effects that will no doubt send fans straight to 'tron heaven (the mellotron features prominently throughout the album, relegating the guitars to a secondary role). Jens Andreassen exploits his synths to the fullest, wrenching out a variety of experimental analog sounds and noises (what he does with filters and oscillators is simply amazing). The only problem with the album is its poor sound - it was recorded in a bomb cellar of a hotel, in the town of Finnsnes. Except for this flaw, "Akasha" is brilliant and a true gem of underground Scandinavian prog. 

If you fancy plenty of mellotron and spacey experimental sounds (and don't mind a 'so-so' production), no doubt you'll have your hands - and ears! - full with AKASHA....


 Talk about a totally obscure, underground gem of prog rock, this Norwegian band released this one and only album, then disappeared. They resided in a town called Finnsnes, which is way up north of the Arctic Circle, on the coast. And despite what has to be a very remote and desolate area of the country, it's a miracle a prog rock band existed there, and there was even a local label called BAT Records, willing to release this album. 
As you might guess, the original LP received only local distribution, and commands three digit prices in the collector's market. Anyway, the production isn't that great, it has that homemade feel, and was recorded in bomb cellar at hotel in the band's home town. Despite that, it's an excellent example of spacy prog, loaded with tons of spacy electronic effects off synthesizers, and tons of Mellotron that's ever present! You can't go wrong with that if you're a Mellotron fan! The singing is in English, with a strong sci-fi bent to them. 

The band consisted of vocalist Sverre Svendsen (who also handles Mellotron), Kjeil Evensen on drums, Arild Andreassen on bass, Jens Ivar Andreassen on guitar, Mellotron, and synthesizers, and Tor-Jonny Hansen supplying the words (as well as hymn on "Death Hymn"). They even credit Bjørn Hugo Gjøen for the psychedelic light show. The album consists of eight cuts, such as "The Isle of Kawai", "Bondage", the emotionless "Death Hymn", the electronic "Electronic Nightmare", and "The Trip". These are all excellent songs, despite the sloppy production. 

And while the LP is difficult to find, it was made available on CD on the sadly now-defunct Ad Perpetuam Memoriam (APM) label out of Sweden, giving this album the attention in the prog community it never received before. Anyway, this is an excellent album to have in your collection....by Proghead .


This one took a while to really get a handle on and absorb. It's hard to believe this was released in 1977 because it sounds more like something from the late sixties. I think that's half it's charm while the other half is the mellotron. Haha.Yes mellotron is all over this one,along with plenty of synths and spacey sounds. Vocals are in English and suit this psychedelic music just fine. 
"Isle Of Kawi" is the longest track at 11 minutes. It opens with spacey sounds that are joined by a quickly strummed guitar. The guitar stops a minute in as spacey sounds dominate. Mellotron floods the soundscape 2 minutes in with more spaciness to follow. Themes are repeated. Vocals after 4 1/2 minutes remind me of FLOYD as mellotron flows. A keyboard melody follows 5 minutes in reminding me of FRUITCAKE. It sounds like the same keyboard ! More mellotron 9 minutes in with keys to end it. "Bondage" opens with strummed guitar, vocals and spacey sounds. The tempo picks up with melotron a minute in as well as guitar, drums and lots of spacey synths. Slow paced vocals come in until the uptempo melody returns 4 minutes in. The song changes to a brighter sound 5 1/2 minutes in with vocals, keys and mellotron. Nice. "Regitativ" features some gentle guitar with background sounds. Vocals followed by an uptempo melody follows. The drumming is prominant. Nice guitar solo with mellotron to end it. 

"Electronic Nightmare" is pretty much 2 minutes of electronic sounds. "Death Hymn" opens with drums as synths swirl about. A change 2 minutes in as spoken words come in reminding me of ELOY. The instrumental work here is tasteful with mellotron waves. Some singing before 4 minutes is brief before the spoken words come back. "Light And Darkness" is a cool song that opens quietly with cymbal sounds then reserved vocals. A minute in the vocals are passionate as is the raw guitar. It becomes 60's sounding 2 1/2 minutes in but also reminding me of some of the nineties alternative bands i've listened to. I like it. It's like he shouts out the lyrics. It ends with laughing. "The Trip" features vocals, FRUITCAKE-keys, drums and a storm of mellotron. Great tune. Some outstanding drumming. "Man Of The Void" is pastoral with vocals and mellotron. The tempo changes quickly a few times. The best part of the song is 2 minutes in when he sings slowly with spacey sounds, gentle guitar and light drums. A 60's flavour follows with mellotron. It ends with waves of sound coming and going. 

Barely 4 stars. A must for fans of both psychedelic music and mellotron...by Mellotron Storm ..


Buttered up Butterflies 
Groovy man!! This is some of that sticky icky stuff, although handed over in a quite recognisable setting. No mirages here people! Most times, when I recommend albums that are groovy and psychedelic, they tend to be roaring wild and completely gone fishing, - yet with this Norwegian outing, you get something that relies just as much on symphonic sweeps of breezy music - to the simmering Germanic electronics that infested most of the Krautrock scene all through the 70s. 

Released in 1977, this album sure sounds out of touch with the surrounding music scene. As John points out in his review, you really get the feel of a late sixties album here. Ok, there's far more happening on the progressive front - meaning that you get your fair share of turnovers and quirky meddlesome pieces slicing their way into the midst of things. Every track here hides something ethereal, hard rocking or even b-b-b-bibbedi-bubbly with sneaky old school almost Berliner school electronics dating back to a time of sabre-toothed tigers and early synthesizers running on coal and small children. 

I keep thinking King Crimson for some reason, and perhaps that is not such a bad reference after all. In fact, if you can imagine the legendary In the Court of the Crimson King handed over in a looser and slightly more esoteric dressing, then you're just about halfway there. The innovative usage of mellotron that Fripp conjured up roams freely on this release - it's icy, lofty and damn near omnipresent throughout. Working like a constant flow of autumnal power - a way of supporting what all the other instruments are doing in a delicate and airy manner. Add to that, those drums remind me of Michael Giles - you know that jazzy wooden feel that counters everything around it, while at the same time relegating a natural rhythm train, which is tight as hell. 

This is indeed an album worthy of all the symphonic fans' attention. The textures are huge like mighty ghost-like statures towering high above the other side of the coin here, which flutters around on the ground like a swarm of bewildered bees. Yes, I'm referring to the synths here, although they aren't as in your face as you'd imagine from my opening statement. They dwell at the bottom end of the sea, albeit for the soloing moog that gets carte blanche whenever the music calls for a secondary sweet spot other than the be-winged guitars. -Either rocking the house with fat hard riffage or bursting out in cathartic solos, they do match the music perfectly. 

Reading this review back, one could quickly come to a 4 star conclusion, yet there's one thing holding me back - keeping me from an adoration big as the African continent. Vocals. Rightly described as a Scandinavian mirroring of Greg Lake - they circle around the passionate immersion. A way of launching oneself into the lyrical segments like a flaming arrow. Though much to my disappointment, they reek of Scandinavian accent, and that's just about the most awful coating you could ever wish to present the English language in. Big mistake - and sadly the sole reason for the 3.5 stars. 

Even so, I strongly recommend this album to fans of early King Crimson, Procol Harum, Moody Blues, Spring, Cressida and Eloy. The music here is nothing short of stunningly beautiful. Buttered up butterflies.....by Guldbamsen .


 Extremely obscure Norwegian band with just one known album.Akasha came from the city of Kjollefjord and consisted of Sverre Svendsen on voices and Mellotron, Kjell Evensen on drums, Arild Andreassen on bass and Jens Ivar Andreassen on guitars and various keyboards, while Tor-Jonny Hansen appears to be as writer of some of the band's lyrics.They released their sole LP on Bat Records in 1977, while the album was recorded at a cellar of a local hotel according to the album's notes. 
Akasha were not only historically obscure, but their sound was also quite extraordinary, full of experimental injections and psychedelic overtones, although not always convincing.They played a sophisticated and intricate Progressive Rock with angular, synth-based spacey vibes, orchestral overtones and bizzare psychedelic textures with atonal parts.They appear to have built their ideas heavily on keyboards with the mightly Mellotron being a first priority for the band, while there are also heavy doses of synthesizers with lighter organ and piano lines around.Soundwise they come as a cross between ELOY's spaciness, KING CRIMSON's early Mellotron-based days, GONG's enigmatic stylings and FANTASY's smooth, vocal-led passages.The variety of styles presented makes the album a bit incohesive, but on the other hand there is a charming, dramatic yet melancholic mood in the background of the whole effort.Long instrumental themes with both loose and tight deliveries are among the album's highlights, based on a solid rhythm section and the diverse keyboard exercises, while the vocals are also quite nice in terms of expression, although they lack a certain range or unique color. 

Even more weird is the fact that all of Akasha members dissapeared from the music scene with a sole appearance of Jens Ivar Andreassen on the 82' single ''Sov sov sov'' of the New Wave group Adams Fall. 

This is one of the cases, when an highly obscure album bocemes better known through its various reissues over time.So fans of spacey, Mellotron-drenched Progressive Rock should be the first to acquire this work.Partly genuine and warmly recommended......by apps79 ..


In my opinion this only album by the Norwegian band Akasha is a very underrated package. The sound quality is indeed pretty weak and the singer could be better but the band still sounds damn good. Their style is a mix of early progressive rock and space rock with lots and lots of mellotron. 

"Isle of Kawi", "Bondage", "Death Hymn" and "Light and Darkness" are just great and they're the highlights here. But the rest of the material is solid and enjoyable as well. It's hard to imagine that if you like the 1970's prog rock with mellotron that you wouldn't like this album. 

A very good underground album from Norway. Perhaps this is not for everybody but I personally like this one very much. Four stars out of five. Almost 4,5 stars actually....by...CooperBolan ...


Akasha's LP from 1977 is one of Norwegian rock's more obscure releases, recorded on a 4-track tape recorder in a bomb room at Finnsnes. Despite equipment-related constraints, this became an album that deserved achieved cult status among collectors, also abroad. Musically, a little dark, melodic prog psychedelia, an expression that at that time was quite unique in Norwegian context. If you like progrock and will be somewhat versed in Norwegian rock history, you should get acquainted with this album, and regardless of it's a quite diverse and entertaining album to listen to. Read more about Akasha in Tore Stemland's highly informative article about BAT Records. 

The fact that Akasha's interest also reached beyond Norway's borders is evident now when the Italian Black Widow has chosen to resubmit the album and they have done a good job. The sound is as good as it can be, and the release comes in a great cover......


Line-up / Musicians
- Sverre Svendsen / vocal, Mellotron on "Light and Darkness"
- Kjell Evensen / drums
- Arild Andreasson / bass
- Jens-Ivar Andreassen / guitar, Mellotron, synths, piano, organ
- Tor Johnny Hansen / words on "Death Hymn"

Songs / Tracks Listing
1. Isle Of Kawi (11:05)
2. Bondage (6:20)
3. Regitativ (1:51)
4. Electronic Nightmare (2:16)
5. Death Hymn (5:17)
6. Light And Darkness (6:28)
7. The Trip (3:58)
8. Man of The Void (4:51)

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