Saturday, 23 September 2017

Vanity Fare “Coming Home” 1970 UK Pop Rock Compilation



Vanity Fare “Coming Home” 1970 UK  Pop Rock Compilation
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British group, which was very popular in Europe and the US in the late 60’s. Was founded by school friends in the summer of 1968 in Rochester (Kent). Originally called “The Avengers” and played in local clubs and eateries, until they were noticed by the producer and manager Roger Easterby. The guys took the name “Vanity Fare” and signed a contract with “Page One Records” (a division of “Bell Records”). Their first hit, “I Live For The Sun”, appeared in August 1968 and took 20th place in England. In the summer of 1969, the song “Early In The Morning” was on the 8th place in the British charts, and in December of the same year the band had the highest success, releasing the single “Hitchin ‘A Ride”. This release reached 16 places in the UK and number 5 in the US (Billboard Hot 100). In the US, the song was in the charts for twenty-three weeks, and especially popular with the hippies from the west coast. The disc was sold in the amount of more than a million copies and received the status of gold. Then followed a big tour to the States, where they performed together with “Beach Boys” and “The Mamas & The Papas”……




Vanity Fare (due to the similarity of the novel and magazine title often misspelled Vanity Fair) are a UK pop/rock group formed in 1966, best remembered for its million-selling song, “Hitchin’ a Ride”, which became a worldwide hit in 1970.
School friends Trevor Brice (born 12 February 1945, Rochester, Kent, England) (vocals), Tony Goulden (born Anthony Goulden, 21 November 1942, Rochester) (guitar), Dick Allix (born Richard Allix, 3 May 1945, Gravesend, Kent) (drums) and Tony Jarrett (born Anthony Jarrett, 4 September 1943, in Rochester, Kent) (bass) formed the band in Kent in 1966, originally calling themselves The Avengers. As The Avengers, they recorded a number of demos with record producer Joe Meek, including “Marianne”, though none were ever released. After this they changed their name to The Sages, and had one 45 single release on the RCA Victor label (47-8760) called “In The Beginning” on the “A” side and “I’m Not Going To Cry” on the “B” side.They played local clubs and were spotted by entrepreneur Roger Easterby who became their manager and producer. Having changed the name of the band to Vanity Fare after the novel Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray, they signed to Larry Page’s Page One Records. 

Vanity Fare achieved a UK hit single with their first release, a cover of “I Live For The Sun” (originally recorded by The Sunrays in 1965) in the summer of 1968.

Following two more singles, “Summer Morning” and “Highway Of Dreams,” both of which failed to make the UK Singles Chart, they released their biggest UK hit, “Early in the Morning”. Written by Mike Leander and Eddie Seago, it reached number 8 in that country in August 1969 and number 12 in the US in early 1970.[1] It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc.

For their next release “Hitchin’ a Ride”, they added keyboardist Barry Landemen (born 25 October 1947, Woodbridge, Suffolk, England) to the group. “Hitchin’ A Ride”, written by Peter Callander and Mitch Murray, gave them a second million-selling hit,[2] reaching #1 for two weeks each on Chicago radio stations WCFL (May 1970) and WLS (June 1970), #5 on the Hot 100 (June–July 1970), and #16 in the UK (January 1970). 

The hit was preceded by a tour of the United States, following which both Dick Allix and Tony Goulden left the band and were replaced by guitarist and singer Eddie Wheeler and drummer Mark Ellen. 

Two more singles followed before the end of 1970; Mike Leander and Eddie Seago’s “Come Tomorrow” and Roger Cook and Roger Greenaway’s “Carolina’s Coming Home” both of which failed to dent the charts on either side of the Atlantic. In addition, a belated US release of “Summer Morning” only charted to #98 for two weeks. 

Over the next couple of years more singles were released including Tony Macaulay’s “Better By Far” on DJM Records in 1972, but none of them entered the charts. Following this they decided to concentrate on live performances touring Europe, where they were having hit singles. Following the mid-1970s, and amid many band member changes (including the departure of Jarrett, replaced by Bernie Hagley), the group recorded only sporadically. In 1986, the band attempted to represent the UK in the Eurovision Song Contest, finishing third in the UK heat of A Song for Europe, with the song “Dreamer” featuring Jimmy Cassidy on vocals, Phil Kitto on keyboards alongside longtime members Ellen, Wheeler and Bernie Hagley. In 2007 they toured alongside P. J. Proby. In August 2015 drummer Mark Ellen retired from Vanity Fare after playing with the band for 43 years and was replaced by Howard Tibble. 

They are still together today with a line-up of Hagley, Wheeler, Tibble and Steve Oakman. 

In his spare time, Brice sings second tenor with the City of Bath Male Choir, who reached the final of BBC One’s Last Choir Standing. His son, Sebastian Brice, is part of the alt/rock band Avius….wiki….












Members
Bernie Hagley 
Eddie Wheeler 
Howard Tibble 
Steve Oakman 
Past members Trevor Brice 
Tony Goulden 
Dick Allix 
Tony Jarrett 
Barry Landemen 
Jimmy Cassidy 
Phil Kitto 
Brian Johnson 
Mark Ellen





Tracklist 
A1 Hitchin A Ride
A2 Megowd(Something Tells Me)
A3 (I Remember) Summer Morning
A4 Waiting For Nightfall
A5 Carolinas Comin Home
B1 Early In The Morning
B2 Youve Lost That Lovin Feeling
B3 Four String Winds
B4 On The Other Side Of Life
B5 Comer Tomorrow


Singles
I Live For The Sun (1968) 
Summer Morning (1968) 
Highway Of Dreams (1969) 
Early In The Morning (1969) 
Hitchin’ A Ride (1969) 
Come Tomorrow (1970) 
Carolina’s Coming Home (1970) 
Where Did All The Good Times Go? (1971) 
Our Own Way of Living (1971) 
Better By Far (1972) 
The Big Parade (1972) 
I’m In Love With The World (1972) 
Rock And Roll Is back (1972) 
Take It Shake It Break My Heart (1973) 
Fast Running Out Of World (1974) 
Dreamer (1986) 
Rain (1993)

Albums
The Sun - The Wind - And Other Things (1968) 
Early In The Morning (1969) 
Coming Home (1970) 
Hitchin’ A Ride (1974) 
Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow (Kompilation, 1994) 
The Best of Vanity Fare (2004) 

Vox Dei “La Nave Infernal” 1973 Argentina Hard Blues Rock


Vox Dei “La Nave Infernal” 1973 Argentina Hard Blues Rock 
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In July of 1973 Vox Dei publishes The Infernal Ship, which has the characteristic of being the first live album performed by a group in Argentine rock, and that only had the antecedent of the “Acusticazo” (of several authors). The shots for this album were recorded by the legendary technician Robertone who managed to leave the polenta of the group on stage. 
Recorded during a national tour realized between ends of 1972 and principles of 1973, that included places like Cordova, Tucumán and Buenos Aires. Also, this is the last disc of the group edited for Disc Jockey, since soon they get a contract with CBS. 
At that time, Vox Dei was in a point of great popularity, reason why they come to realize presentations in places like the Argentine Theater and the Theater Coliseo of Buenos Aires. For this, they decide to record part of the presentations realized in a live disc (something not habitual for that time in an Argentine group), mainly including new material. The album contains a version of “Genesis” and “Without Separating More,” which are the only songs included in this LP, which the band had previously released on studio albums…



This album has the characteristic of being the first live album performed by a group in Argentine rock, and that only had the antecedent of the “Acusticazo” of several authors that we have already presented in the blog. The shots for this album were recorded by the legendary technician Robertone who managed to leave the polenta of the group on stage. 
They are mostly new compositions; the sound of the disc is very typical of the band, although of course, it adds the fact of being recorded live. That rock at times very raw, well in his personal style. Although it does not achieve the incredible glory of the conceptual work “The Bible”, or “Jeremiah Feet Lead”, it is a very good album….




The technical facilities for recording a record in Argentina in the early 1970s were not those of the great American or English studios, and especially the first bands of Rock had to deal with engineers and producers to interpret what they wanted to achieve. Of course it was not like now that the bands are going to master to Los Angeles with a tour armed by the label, with sushi and ‘all inclusive’ shopping tour … 
So imagine what it was to record live !. That’s why Vox Dei’s 'La Nave Infernal’, which in 1973 was the first 'Live’ in the history of Argentine Rock, is not especially a jewel in audio matters. But that same crudeness makes it irresistible … But listen to the polenta of 'Round and Round Around the Sun’, the 'Genesis’ of 'The Bible’ or any other, considering also that six of the eight songs are 'original’ since they had not been previously edited…


- Ricardo Soulé / guitarras, armónica, voz 
- Willy Quiroga / bajo, voz 
- Rubén Basoalto / batería



01. 9.000 Veces Más 
02. Vueltas Y Vueltas Alrededor Del Sol 
03. Un Renegado… Ese Soy Yo 
04. Si Separarnos Más 
05. Esta Es Quizás La Última Vez 
06. Génesis 
07. Amor Y Seis 
08. La Nave Infernal






Albums: 
1970 - Caliente (Mandioca MLP334) 
1971 - La Biblia (Dbl) (Disc Jockey 14004/5) 
1972 - Jeremias Pies De Plomo (Disc Jockey 15175) 
1972 - Cuero Caliente (Disc Jockey 25176) 
1973 - La Nave Infernal (Disc Jockey 25177) 
1973 - Es Una Nube, No Hay Duda (CBS 119289) 
1974 - Vox Dei Para Vox Dei (CBS119409) 

Singles: 
1969 - Sin Ropa: Azúcar Amarga/Quiero Ser (Mandioca MS009) 
1970 - Presente/Dr. Jekill (Mandioca MS015) 
1970 - Canción para una mujer (que no está)/Total que (Mandioca MS019) 
1972 - Donde has estado todo este tiempo/Tan sólo un hombre (Disc Jockey TS1383) 
1973 - Jeremías pies de plomo/Ritmo y blues con armónicas (Disc Jockey TS1454) 

Duffy "Just In Case You’re Interested…“1972 UK Prog Hard Rock


Duffy  "Just In Case You’re Interested…“1972 UK Prog Hard Rock 
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Obscure UK Hard Prog band that released this first album back in 1972 only in South Africa. Second press in 74 in Germany and France (different sleeve). A later press appeared in 1978 on Brazil with an unique sleeve. 

This is the original 1972 sleeve pressed in a limited run of 400 copies with remastered sound. 
Duffy took influence from other UK Hard Prog giants such as early Deep Purple and Uriah Heep, but crossed it with pastoral Rock ala Jethro Tull. 
The band also released a second album in 1973 ("Scruffy Duffy”) finishing shortly after their career. Both albums are very hard to find, so it’s time for a revamp of this great UK Prog band that should not be forgotten in the UK 70’s Rock history!………


Vinyl reissue of 1972 UK band’s album only originally released in Germany and France. Psych Rock with clear, progressive influences, similar to early Uriah Heep, Deep Purple and Humble Pie- with some minor Jethro Tull influences, too. Has a cover of The Animals “Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood” …




- Stuart (The Queen) Reffold (Stuart Benzee) - lead vocals, harp, percussion 
- Barry (Fruity) Coote - guitars 
- Joe (Leslie) Nanson - organ, vocals 
- Patrick (Paddy) Sarjeant - bass, vocals 
- Will (Wombat) Wright - drums, percussion 




Tracklist 
A1 Matchmaker
A2 Long Lost Friend
A3 Judgement Day
A4 Amie
A5 It’s My Life
B1 Rock Solid
B2 Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood
B3 Tell Me
B4 Riverside
B5 Place To Lie 

Gulliver Smith (Company Caine) “The Bands Alright But The Singer Is…” 1973 Australia Prog Jazz Rock Blues Rock


Gulliver Smith (Company Caine) “The Bands Alright But The Singer Is…” 1973 Australia Prog Jazz Rock Blues Rock
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Kevin Gullifer Hopkins-Smith (born Kevin Gullifer Smith ca. 1950 – November 2014), who performed as Little Gulliver and Gulliver Smith (also styled as Gullifer Smith), was an Australian singer and songwriter from the early 1960s to mid-2000s. He was the front man and founding mainstay vocalist of Company Caine. In 1976 he and Ross Wilson co-wrote “A Touch of Paradise” for Wilson’s group, Mondo Rock, which appeared on their third album, Nuovo Mondo (July 1982). It was covered by John Farnham on his album, Whispering Jack (October 1986), and was issued as its third single in February 1987, which reached the top 30 on the Kent Music Report Singles Chart. 

Gulliver Smith died on 12 November 2014 from kidney failure, and was survived by his wife Stephanie Hopkins-Smith (nee Hopkins) and their three sons. According to Australian musicologist, Ian McFarlane, “Smith drew on vintage rock'n'roll, Professor Longhair-styled New Orleans R&B, psychedelia and soul for inspiration. He was known for his outrageous stage act, which incorporated an inventive free-form approach and much evangelist-styled ad-libbing. Later on, he added a satirical Zappaesque component to his on-stage banter and lyrics.”

Kevin Gullifer Smith (later Kevin Gullifer Hopkins-Smith) was born in the 1950s and was a child performer in the early 1960s in Melbourne, covering tracks by artists from the previous decade.[1][2] Occasionally he was a guest singer for local bands, the Thunderbirds and the Lincolns.[1] Smith remembered his early performances “I remembering listening to gospel records where people would start preaching in the middle of the song. A lot of soul music would have the guys interrupt the singing to talk about their broken heart, so that gave me the idea. I used to imitate Johnny Ray when I was nine or ten. He used to cry on stage.”

In 1965 he fronted Little Gulliver and the Children, a R&B and soul band, on lead vocals with Ian McCausland on guitar and Lawrie Byrnes on drums. Smith explained “my manager changed my name from the original spelling of Gullifer, which is Welsh, to Gulliver.” They issued two singles, “Short Fat Fannie” (cover version of Larry William’s 1957 single) in September, and “No Money Down” (1955 original by Chuck Berry) in March 1966.[1] A self-titled extended play appeared in September 1966.[4] Smith would interrupt live performances of songs to deliver a monologue, “some little vignette that was quite unrelated.”[

Late in 1966 the group disbanded and Smith relocated to Sydney: the group was not getting enough work and Smith explained “I used to do the TV show Its all Happeningquite a bit in Sydney and one time I just decided to stay here.” From the EP their track, “I Was Bewitched”, later appeared on a various artists compilation album, Pretty Ugly (1998).

In Sydney in 1967 Smith joined Dr Kandy’s Third Eye, a psychedelic soul, R&B band, with Mal Capewell on saxophone, Arthur Eizenberg on bass guitar, Zane Hudson on saxophone, Dave Kain on guitar (ex-Untamed), Alison McCallum on co-lead vocals, Daryl McKenzie on drums, Kevin Patterson on trumpet and Bob Walsh on organ. Smith realised “I had gone past the soul and blues area by that time and I wanted to be more creative and write more.” They did not release any recordings, although Smith co-wrote tracks for the group, including “The Day Superman Got Busted”. Kain later described the band to The Canberra Times’ Michael Foster as “well-known and successful at the time of the psychedelic movement” and of his “being made very aware by jazz musicians, experimentation with drugs.”

In 1968 Smith was fired from Dr Kandy’s Third Eye and formed a jazz-blues ensemble, Noyes, with Bobby Gebert on piano, John Helman on bass guitar, Mick Liber on guitar (ex-Python Lee Jackson) and Dave Ovendon on drums. When Helman and Liber left, Smith and Ovenden enlisted Kain and Terry Wilkins on bass guitar to create a free-form, soul band, Time and the Forest Flower. In early 1969, after McKenzie and a horn section joined, they were renamed as A Love Supreme, but Smith left in mid-year to return to Melbourne.[1] Australian musicologist, Ian McFarlane, felt their “radical fusion of jazz, rock and blues never really gelled.”

In March 1970 Smith formed Company Caine with Ray Arnott on drums (ex-Chelsea Set, Browns, Cam-Pact), Cliff Edwards on bass guitar (ex-Cam-Pact), Jeremy Noone (aka Jeremy Kellock) on saxophone and keyboards (ex-Leo and Friends) and Russell Smith (no relation: born Russell Kinross-Smith) on guitar and vocals (ex-Cam-Pact).

McFarlane described them as “one of the most adventurous, avant-garde outfits of the day.” In November 1971 they issued their first album, A Product of a Broken Reality, which included the group’s version of “The Day Superman Got Busted”. Smith felt that recording sessions were “great, because we had a week in the studio where we just played our repertoire and could do whatever we wanted to.” McFarlane opined that it was “more expansive, more ‘out there’ than just about every band… [The album] remains a milestone of the early 1970s progressive rock era.” They disbanded in October 1972. 

Smith initially explored forming a group with former Daddy Cool members, Ross Hannaford and Ross Wilson however this did not eventuate. Smith then worked on his debut solo album, The Band’s Alright but the Singer Is… (June 1973), with former band mates Arthur Eizenberg, Ernie McInerny, Russell Smith, Jeremy Noone (all ex-Company Caine), Bobby Gebert (Dr Kandy’s Third Eye); and new associates Dave Conners on saxophone and Mick Tulk on guitar (both ex-Lizard).

McFarlane determined that the album was “basically a Company Caine album in everything but name. It was a very entertaining album with its uptempo mix of blues, country, psychedelia and Professor Longhair-styled New Orleans R&B elements.” To promote it, Smith formed the Dead End Kids in May 1973 with Conners, Noone and Tulk joined by Greg Hill on bass guitar (ex-Lizard), Greg Sheehan on drums (ex-Blackfeather) and Bruce Woodcock on piano (ex-Sons of the Vegetal Mother). In 1975 Gulliver Smith and Russell Smith reformed Company Caine with a new line up and issued the group’s second album, Doctor Chop, with Wilson producing three of its tracks. Once again the group disbanded.

Smith formed Gulliver’s Travels in mid-1976 with Capewell, Wayne Duncan on bass guitar (ex-Daddy Cool), Gerry Joyce on guitar, John Mills on keyboards (ex-Spectrum, Ariel) and Robert Souter on drums (ex-Lizard). In the following year Greg Lawrie (ex-Carson) replaced Joyce on guitar and Ian Mawson (ex-Company Caine, Levi Smith’s Clefs) replaced Mills on keyboards. However, during in 1977 Smith relocated to the United Kingdom where he founded the Gulliver Smith Band.

In about 1976 Smith and Wilson co-wrote “A Touch of Paradise” for Wilson’s proposed group, Mondo Rock. Wilson later recalled, “it was the first song I wrote when I was putting together a new band that I would call Mondo Rock, and it stands out as it is far more sensitive than other songs I was writing at the time.” The group struggled to record it, “We tried around three times to record it and we demoed it,” their version is on the group’s third album, Nuovo Mondo (July 1982). 

“A Touch of Paradise” was covered by John Farnham on his album, Whispering Jack (October 1986), and was issued as its third single in February 1987, which reached the top 30 on the Kent Music Report Singles Chart. Wilson described Farnham’s version, “It wasn’t a huge hit, but it was one of those songs that because the album was so massive, they just kept putting songs on the radio, and that was one of them. So 10 years after it was written, John redefined what it was all about.” 

In 1989 Smith returned to Sydney and formed a new version of Gulliver’s Travels with Steve Blau on keyboards, Allan Britton on bass guitar (ex-Dynamic Hepnotics) Andrew Reid on guitar, and Robert Souter on drums (ex-Dynamic Hepnotics). In 1996 Smith, as Gullifer, teamed with Stephanie Hopkins (his domestic partner) to release an album, Deux Poètes, on Dragon Records.McFarlane summarised that “Smith drew on vintage rock'n'roll, Professor Longhair-styled New Orleans R&B, psychedelia and soul for inspiration. He was known for his outrageous stage act, which incorporated an inventive free-form approach and much evangelist-styled ad-libbing. Later on, he added a satirical Zappaesque component to his on-stage banter and lyrics.” 

Gulliver Smith died on 12 November 2014 of kidney failure, “after a long illness”, and was survived by his wife Stephanie Hopkins-Smith (nee Hopkins) and their three sons…..wiki…



Gulliver Smith - Vocals 

Russell Smith - Lead Guitar 
Mick Tulk - Slide Guitar,Rythm Guitar 
Arthur Eizenburg - Bass 
John McLnerny - Drums and Percussion 
Jeremy Kellock - Tenor Saxophone,All Violin arrangements 
Bobby Gebbertt - Piano 
Dave Conners - Tenor Saxophnone and Alto Saxophone



1. Theme For A Phantom Airport 
2. Jet-Set Blues 
3. Almost Freedom 
4. Such A Shame 
5. A Melody For Edgar Allan Poe 
6. Paradise Woman 


1. Mascara Blue 
2. Youe Old Friend 
3. A Lazy Shoe 
4. Hey George

Discography 
Albums 
The Band’s Alright but the Singer Is… (June 1973) 
Deux Poètes (by Gullifer) (1996) 
Singles 
“Such a Shame” (July 1973) 
“Lazy Shoe” (October 1973) 
“Don’t Keep Doin’ It Duke” (July 1980) 

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