Saturday, 25 November 2017

Resurrection Band ‎ “Music To Raise The Dead” 1974 US Christian Hard Rock Cassette, Promo



Resurrection Band ‎ “Music To Raise The Dead” 1974 US  Christian Hard Rock
Cassette, Promo 
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Recording Rainbow's End

Resurrection (Rez) Band was one of the early pioneers of Christian rock music. They began in 1972 as a part of a Christian traveling community called Jesus People USA that would set up Christian rock revivals in towns and cities all over the south and midwest United States. They released their first album in 1979 and continued playing Christian rock music through 16 albums and over 25 years. 

Known predominantly for their hard rock sound led by husband and wife duo Glenn and Wendi Kaiser, they also incorporated heartfelt ballads, gritty blues, and even some experimental electronic music. Rez toured all over the world, playing rock & roll and preaching the gospel; breaking down conventional prejudices against hard rock music in the traditional church. They helped to open the doors to countless musicians who can now express themselves and their relationship to God in all manner of musical styles. 

Check out Resurrection Band’s DVD Beyond Music, a retrospective interview with Resurrection Band. In 2009, the most current members of Resurrection Band got together for this interview, telling stories about their experiences in Resurrection Band. This hour-long interview is full of personal anecdotes, never before seen photos, and footage from the Rez XX Years Live concert. …
Sounds like … classic rock from the late ‘70s and early '80s by bands like Jefferson Airplane, Led Zeppelin, AC/DC, U2, Heart, Aerosmith, Journey, and ZZ Top….~

Some early Resurrection Band. Tom Cameron, Jim Denton, Stu Heiss (Back) John Herrin, Glenn & Wendi.

Earliest known pic of Resurrection Band (Just called Resurrection

Resurrection Band is probably better known for their contributions to ministry and Christian culture than for their music. Born out of the Jesus Movement—and in some sense, continuing the spirit of it to this day—the members were instrumental in helping establish Jesus People USA in North Chicago in 1972. They’re also responsible for launching Cornerstone Festival, the annual alternative Christian music event that draws artists and audiences from all over the country. 

But Resurrection Band was every bit the Christian rock pioneer that Petra was, and remained true to their classic rock roots over most of their 30-year span. True, their sound did change with the times, as did their name—to Rez Band and simply Rez in the '80s and '90s—but the band maintained a core sound and a remarkably consistent lineup, with only Roy Montroy replacing original bassist Jim Denton back in 1988. 

Borrowing the title of the Resurrection Band’s first independent release in 1974, as well as the title of their first best-of compilation in 1984, Music to Raise the Dead: 1972-1998 demonstrates how to do a box set right. Though no thicker than a pair of CD jewel cases, the packaging includes three CDs spanning the band’s long career (each in their own sleeve), as well as a DVD with an impressively preserved concert from Chicago in 1992 and a thick 80-page booklet …~


Music to Raise the Dead is the first independent cassette from American Christian rock band Resurrection Band, released in 1974. Although technically the band’s first release, the album Awaiting Your Reply four years later is considered by most to be the band’s official debut.The cassette, featuring the kind of hard rock for which Resurrection Band would eventually become known, was recorded not long after the Jesus People USA community had moved from Minneapolis to Chicago, but before they found a permanent home in Uptown. The record was created in the basement of friend Gary Rotta entirely on headphones, so as not to wake Rotta’s wife, who was asleep when the band recorded. However, the mixing board had been used many years previously to record one of Elvis Presley’s number-one hits. 

The tape was recorded in the same period than All Your Life, both of which were given away at their concerts. All your life was an independent set of acoustic numbers, a reflection of folk-oriented sets that were played at conservative venues, like nursing homes and churches, whose audiences would otherwise be unreceptive to the borderline heavy metal that Resurrection Band otherwise played and which were contained in the rock set Music To Raise the Dead. The cassette was re-released in a limited number of copies by the band’s own label, Grrr Records, in 1992. It is considered a collector’s item and is extremely hard to find. 

The song “Quite Enough” was re-recorded in a live version on the 1984 album Live Bootleg….~















Band members 

Glenn Kaiser - Lead vocals, guitars 
Wendi Kaiser - Lead vocals 
Stu Heiss - Lead guitar, piano 
Jim Denton - Bass guitar, backing vocals 
John Herrin - drums 
Tom Cameron - Harmonica



Tracklist 
A1 Down Baby 6:17 
A2 I Can’t Help Myself 4:17 
A3 Crimson River 6:04 
A4 There Will Be Fire 4:03 
B1 We Can See 4:42 
B2 Better Way 4:01 
B3 Growin’ Stronger 4:22 
B4 The Man I Used To Be 5:25 
B5 Quite Enough 5:58 

Plebb "Yes It Isn’t It" 1979 Swedish Private Prog Hard Rock


Plebb  "Yes It Isn’t It" 1979  ultra rare Swedish Private Prog Hard Rock
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Plebb are in essence a hard rock band with that patented twin guitar attack. They offer a smorgasbord of musical styles presenting the instrumental palette of two guitars, bass, and drums. With “Yes It Isn’t It” you will hear reggae influenced hard rock (‘Reaggie IIb’); Brilliantly intense dual guitar jamming like the Dutch group Cargo ('Push Box’); Hard rock party music ('Rockaria’); Early riffing metal with nice melodic leads ('Tankar om Natten’); Heavy rock balladry / proto Power Pop like early 80’s Scorpions ('Förflutet’); Instrumental dual acoustic guitar ('Psst’); And proggy hard rock ('Fresh Fish’). Some of the lead electric guitar work presented here is truly sublime. Swedish vocals add an exotic touch, for us English speakers anyway. 'Push Box’ and 'Tankar Om Natten" are the highlights for sure. This album has grown on me over time…..by….ashratom ……~



Amazing LP released on PLEBB’s own label limited to 500 copies. A must have for fans of 70’s Hard Rock. 

Plebb from Sweden was founded 1976. The first years the band consisted of Ronnie Nilsson (Drums), Leif Bergqvist (Guitar), Per-Martin Petersson (Guitar) och Tommy Gustavsson (Bass). All members are from the town Mönsterås in the South East part of Sweden. The summer 1977 Leif Bergqvist had to leave the band due to illness (he would later appear in the band ICTUS). Peter Martinsson replaced him on the guitar. At the time the band developed and started to write more own songs. The song ’First Day In Roxy’ was made when they moved to their new rehearsal place, The Roxy cinema in Mönsterås. 

The summer 1978 a cassette was recorded under primitive circumstances and was copied by themselves. It was sold to the big crowed of local fans the band had in Mönsterås. Only 40 cassettes were made. The production gave appetite and at New Year 1978/79 their album “Yes It isn’t it” was recorded under the same primitive circumstances as the cassette six month earlier. At the time the boys were 16-18 years old. The album was made in 500 copies. With two ¼” tape recorders the background was recorded and the song and the guitar fills were made by playing the background and record it and the new parts on the other tape recorder. The recording technique is called Sound- on-sound. No mixer board was used, only microphones directly connected to the tape recorders. 

The band later changed their name to PURPLE HAZE and released a MLP in 1981 entitled ’ Det Är Så Man Undrar…’. Per-Martin was later in the band SKYSCRAPER together with QUIL guitarist Christian Carlsson. He’s also in PETER MARTINSSON GROUP together with Peter ….~


Plebb was founded in 1976 and were from the town Mönsterås in Sweden. Despite their young age, they created a unique and special style, of course, inspired by many of the era’s famous rock bands and artists. It is of course the prominent role of the guitars and the songs unusual build that has become Plebb’s token. The album “Yes it isn’t it” became a milestone in their careers. 

The band name was based on the initials of the first band members names, The “P” for “Pemce”. “LeB” for “Leif Bergqvist” and the last “b” for “Balder”. In the early newspaper clippings we were very keen on the spelling “PLeBb” for some reason. We were aware of the Plebeians from the Roman empire but all the other oppressive expressions on Plebb had however not reached our home town at the time. 
The summer 1977 Leif Bergqvist had to leave the band due to an illness. Peter Martinsson replaced him on the guitar and the band started to develop and began to write own songs infuenced by their musical role models. 

Mönsterås has despite being a small community always had a rich music life and has produced many famous and unknown artists in different genres. Some that have influenced us and to some we have been the inspiration. 

This was the debut album for all the band members. More is coming from all of us but in other constellations than Plebb. Today we see two of the former members in Peter Martinsson Group….~


Per-Martin “Pemce” Pettersson - Guitar, Vocals (Peter Martinsson Group, Skyscraper) 
Peter Martinsson - Guitar, Vocals (Purple Haze, Peter Martinsson Group, Dandix, Segers Hörnband) 
Tommy “Gusta'son” Gustavsson - Bass, Vocals (Purple Haze) 
Ronnie “Balder” Nilsson - Drums 


Tracklist
1. Reaggie IIB 
2. Push Box 
3. Rockaria 
4. Tankar Om Natten 
5. Förflutet 
6. Psst… 
7. Fresh Fish 

Electric Mind Machine “Electric Mind Machine ” 2015 US Psych Garage Rock


Electric Mind Machine “Electric Mind Machine ” 2015 US Psych Garage Rock 
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Sara Loera

Electric Mind Machine is one of the most exciting things to come out of the L.A. garage rock scene in a long time. The collaboration between founding members Kenneth Wessel and Sara Loera has resulted in pure sonic alchemy that is sure to induce a state of rock n roll euphoria in all who listen. Sharing an appreciation of the music from the 60s garage, psychedelic, mod and freak beat scenes, they developed their sound; keeping a vintage feel but infusing the energy and excitement of the local Southern California club scene. Vocalist Sara Loera conjures the sultry charisma and power of a modern day Mariska Veres of the legendary Dutch band the Shocking Blue. Supported by the raw, fuzzed out guitars of Kenneth Wessel they create a unique sound that captures the warm feelings of the past, but still has bite. Electric Mind Machine has recently hit the studio to complete a 10 song full-length album. The first song released, ‘Electric Mind Machine,’ was featured on the Garage Punk Hideout’s compilation Countdown to a Breakdown. This song was first played on the Infamous Frankystein Deejay Show on Radiolux in Spain and the UK. A local L.A. radio station KXLU 88.9 fm was the first to preview the upcoming single Pretty Face. The full-length LP will also feature a unique version of Status Quo’s hit Pictures of Matchstick Men . Past projects include the Beat Killers, The Odd Squad, The Sweet Nothings, Crank Williams and 2012 Coachella Festival performers Kiss Kiss Bang Bang……~


Due to the opener “Pretty Face” (and later also “Rabbit Hole”) I had to play this band from LA (or with this duo, the promo shows only the two and other musicians are silent) to BLUES PILLS think. In fact, with ELECTRIC MIND MACHINE the blues are not that far off, but the initial association comes exclusively from female vocals. 
The label or the washboard then suitably speaks of Garage Rock. However, this garage has been in California for at least 50 years, as Sara Loera and Kenneth Wessel and their fellow campaigners have completely dedicated themselves to the sound of the 60s on their first album. 

Fuzzbox and electro-organ are constant companions on this journey to the beginnings of Psychedelic Rock, whereby ELECTRIC MIND MACHINE never gets too big. The guitars are always drawn to role models like THE PRETTY THINGS, THE DOORS or THE WHO (“Blinded By The Sun”), but they are always kept in check by the ingratiating voice of Sara Loera. She prefers to sit next to friendly hippies on the flower meadow, as if debauchery to maltreat the instruments. A warm and warm atmosphere is clearly in the foreground in songs like “Absinthe Supermoon”, the hypnotic title song or the indie-hit-contender “Strange” despite short instrumental eruptions. Only with the degree “Echo Chamber” may it also be a trip to the Acid Cave. 
Perfect fits the only cover song in the overall picture of the album. You skillfully try STATUS QUO’s first single “Picture Of Matchstick Men” from 1968….by…Lars Schuckar…~


“They come from LA and immediately immerse us into the 60s with a strong psychedelic flare…. It’s rock, it’s psyche and damn good.” 
—Lebonair, La Gross Rock Radio, Paris, France

Electric Mind Machine is one of the most exciting things to come out of the L.A. garage rock scene in a long time. The raw fuzzed out guitars and swirling transistor organs has resulted in pure sonic alchemy that is sure to induce a state of rock n’ roll euphoria in all who listen. Sharing an appreciation of the music from the 60s garage, psychedelic, mod and freak beat scenes, they developed their sound; keeping a vintage feel but infusing the energy and excitement of the local Southern California club scene. The vocals of Nina Rose Carlin conjures sultry charisma. Supported by the raw, fuzzed out guitars of Kenneth Wessel (Kiss Kiss Bang Bang, The Beat Killers) they create a unique sound that captures the warm feelings of the past, but still has bite. With the addition of Ian McLachlan, Mark Weddington (The Sloths) and Byron Reynolds (Possum Dixon) Electric Mind Machine is a powerhouse combo. 

Electric Mind Machine self-titled 10-song was released on Bad Reputation Records in May 2015. The title track “Electric Mind Machine,” was featured on the Garage Punk Hideout’s compilation “Countdown to a Breakdown.” Both “Electric Mind Machine” and “Pretty Face” has received great reviews and airplay throughout Europe and the United States. 

Electric Mind Machine had it’s live debut in March of 2015 for a record release show at the Spinout Club and quickly racked up several high profile shows including a legendary show with the Chocolate Watchband at the Whiskey-A-GoGo and shows with such acts as Prima Donna, The Love Me Nots, The Sloths, Midday Veil, The Creation Factory and The Woolly Bandits. 

“Sublime ‘60s garage pop music at its best. Imagine Debby Harry in her prime fronting Imperial State Electric going crazy with a hammond organ on mind altering drugs. With sublime, fuzzed-up guitars all over the shop it’s instant satisfaction guaranteed. This should be all over the radio.” —Ben Hughes, Uber Rock, July 2015…..~


Sharing an appreciation of the music from the '60s garage, psychedelic, mod and freak beat scenes, the members of ELECTRIC MIND MACHINE have developed an irresistible sound. They keep a vintage feel, but infuse the energy and excitement of the local California club scene. Vocalist Sara Loera conjures the sultry charisma and power of a modern day Mariska Veres of Holland’s legendary Shocking Blue. Supported by the raw, fuzzed out guitars of Kenneth Wessel the band creates a unique sound that captures the warm feelings of the past, with all the required bite….~


Does music have medicinal and therapeutic virtues?If doctors and other specialists cast an ear on this first Electric Mind Machine album, they would be tempted to answer yes! Music that resonates in our heads during motorized escapes on the west coast of Los Angeles, when there is no sound, and nothing else to pollute our minds. Said like that, one imagines a dive in the interstellar vacuum but it would be a low consideration to the harmonious forces of our brain, which themselves operate a selective sorting to keep in memory only the best. This duet composed of singer Sara Loera and guitarist Kenneth Wessel offers an intensive course of catching up and is reappropriating a heritage sixties whose own parents have probably never measured the original impact. Fabulous arrangement made of vintage organ well put forward, From a concrete rhythm and a guitar from a garage rock register to a corrosive psychedelism, the two acolytes make us go back in time while intercepting a lot of elements in passing. The references openly displayed by Electric Mind Machine are difficult to contest, faithful to the free and adventurous spirit of their elders. All the tracks juxtaposed one behind the other appear to be one and the moodiness is really worried to be made. Driven by a demonstrative and collective enthusiasm, they wander between sexy singing, psychedelic touch and the organ Farfisa merges totally with this atmosphere giving a particular dimension to the whole. Without warning, Electric Mind Machine grabs us on their first outing and it seems really impossible to resist. An opus that has a power of attraction, like a kitsch police series whose intrigue fascinates us and that we can not help but watch. (Arno Jaffre)….~


Los Angeles garage rock band Electric Mind Machine share a mutual appreciation of '60s influences from garage rock onto psychedelia. Featuring members of Kiss Kiss Bang Bang and Lords Of Altamont among others, they were formed by main songwriter/producer/guitarist Kenneth Wessel and vocalist Sara Loera, aiming to bring the excitement of the Southern California club scene to your stereo while still capturing the retro vibes of days gone by but definitely not forgotten. 

Opener 'Pretty Face’ is worth the entry price alone, what a song! Sublime '60s garage pop music at its best. Imagine Debby Harry in her prime fronting Imperial State Electric going crazy with a hammond organ on mind altering drugs. With sublime, fuzzed-up guitars all over the shop it’s instant satisfaction guaranteed. This should be all over the radio. 

'Absinthe Supermoon’ follows the same power pop path as the guitars of Wessel squeal over sassy '60s beats. A nifty little wah-wah infused solo hits the spot in this upbeat wonder of a song. The title track rides on a tremolo effect guitar and then Wessel’s now trademark fuzzy tones kick in for the chorus, as Sara Loera’s sultry vocals hit the spot, coming on like Anita Chellamah in her Cherry Bombz days. Some nice backward guitars in the breakdown give a touch of Beatles psychedelia to proceedings. 

They’ve got it all going on here, the jangly 'Strange’ comes on like a female-fronted Redd Kross B-side to my ears and I also hear hints of Arthur Lee’s Love going on here. 

Perfectly lazy vocal harmonies bring a cover of Status Quo’s 'Pictures Of Matchstick Men’ right up to date in a retro way if that makes any sense at all. It starts like a jam before breaking into that unmistakeable riff, generally more upbeat and with plenty of wah-wah going on it’s the perfect example of how to breathe new life into an old hit and here they’ve nailed it. 

'Blinded By The Sun’ sounds like Blondie and 'Shout’ comes on like prime Juliette & The Licks… damn I miss that band, but ringing guitars and in your face vocals rule, so this will do nicely. 

'Electric Mind Machine’ is ten songs that could well alter your state of mind, it’s an aural pick me up. If it was a colour it would be day-glo, if it was a food it would be candy that would contain enough E numbers to keep you up all night. 

Electric Mind Machine make music like bands used to do before even colour TV was a thing and that is something to cherish. Get this fuzzy goodness in your ears right now….. by Ben Hughes…~






It’s fuzzed up garage rock time now, and we’re off to Los Angeles to catch up with founding members Kenneth Wessel and Sara Loera. 
Now, what drew me in was their cover of the Status Quo’s ‘Pictures Of Matchstick Men’, but what kept me there was the driving energy that pulsates through the record. Apparently, they feature members of Kiss Kiss Bang Bang and Lords Of Altamont, which may mean something to some of you, but all I hear is primo garage rock, regardless of pedigree. 
There are half a dozen tracks that went straight on repeat play here, including ‘Pretty Face’, ‘Absinthe Supermoon’, the aforementioned wah wah drenched ‘Pictures Of Matchstick Men’ and more. If the rough and ready fuzzbox sixties is your thing, then you need to hear this….~





Sara Loera

Sara Loera


Tracklist: 
Pretty face 
Absinthe Supermoon 
Electric Mind Machine 
Strange 
Rabbit hole 
Picture Of Matchstick Men 
Blinded By The Sun. 
The Torch 
Shout 
Echo Chamber 

Wolfgang Bock "Cycles “1980 Germany Prog Electronic Berlin School


Wolfgang Bock  "Cycles “1980  Germany Prog Electronic Berlin School
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Stunning vintage Berlin school electronics on this debut 12″ from German synthesist Wolfgang Bock. Produced by Klaus Schulze and released on the legendary Telefunken label, this lovely piece of wax is epic in every sense of the word…~

Berlin school electronics mimicking how ice crystals form 
This is one of the first progressive electronic records I acquired. It was not entirely on purpose, meaning that I bought the album solely based on the rather beautiful cover - thinking it would be something psychedelic and fuzzy. Much to my surprise, I found a type of music that sounded completely different from what I´d tried before, and thinking about it now makes me realize just how lucky it(the music) was, that I didn´t just throw it away, or gift wrapped the bugger - turning it into one of those "funny” presents that nobody likes. It struck a chord with me however, right from the first spin, and maybe that has something to do with its persuasive nature, because unlike much of what you´ll find in these treacherous electronic waters, this album is indeed highly seductive and alluring. 

Wolfgang Bock was a late comer to the Berliner School of electronics, and this his debut Cycles was released back in 1980, though luckily without any of the awful plastic traits of the time. Fans of the genre shouldn´t worry, because it certainly sounds as a sweet outing from around 76-77 - bringing with it that slick, soothing and floating texture to it. Cycles was also produced by Klaus Schulze, and this comes as little surprise when you first pop the album on. There are definite traces of Moondawn and Body Love, although Bock sounds far more melodious to these ears. 

Cycles is actually a perfect description of this record, as the music within spins and revolves around itself in what seems like a small slice of eternity. What I find ingenious about it though, is that it never gets repetitive in any way. Take the title track, where everything is so simple and straightforward, that it almost hides these splish-splashes of a pseudo water based synth. Cycles is a piece that lays down the course of this album, and it does so with a firm and feminine touch, as if the tune had been nurtured and breastfed by HAL 9000´s secret lady lover. Through enormous quantities of synthesizer-laden eiderdown sculptures - the small two-stroke engine of the sequencer slowly bobs its gentle and slightly menacing rhythm, to what actually sounds as some euphoric northern winds guided into giant concrete tubes, that makes me think of a slightly skewed urban pan flute. Yep Bock could easily fool you into believing, that some of his best instruments are indeed wind based, and that his greatest, the colossal concrete pan flute, is blown by an ancient Nordic god of breezes. These are cold and desolate sounds though, but they still retain a remarkable beauty, and if sadness could speak - it would be through these chilling sweeps of wind. 

I often think of the time this album was recorded in - those crazy 80s, hangover filled from the rather free nature of the preceding decade. -That plastic and yuppie like coating much of the mainstream music had taken on, and the move towards an easier listen for the audience. It suddenly became important to have videos and songs that you could dance to. Holding Cycles up against this rather colourless artefacts n´ money - sweet money culture, it suddenly takes on the form of music that both describes the yuppie madness and plastic world down to a t, but furthermore stands in opposition of what that meant. Through the coldness and darkness of this record, there´s beauty and yearning - almost screaming passion to be found, and when Bock from time to time releases his fury on either the synths or treated organs, he hits a similar vibe to that of Monsieur Wakeman on his classic organ break of Close to the Edge. The effect is somewhat different here, but it still acts as a sonic Cyclops standing up slowly and awe-inspiring in a massive crowd of people. 

Now I have listened to a fair deal of electronic music in my life, and along with maybe Tangerine Dream´s Stratosfear, Cycles strikes me as a fantastic entrance to this bubbly universe. In addition to being highly melodious in its own way, either through choir mellotrons and dreamy synth soundscapes, this album also features drums. They´re sparse and to the point, but they work so well with the music they accompany. The second track, which is comprised of several parts - uses the drums in a completely different way, than what you hear on the title track, where things are streamlined and not entirely unlike those you´ll hear on a modern Zombi record, - no here on Robsai we get a wild tribal stomp-like section with deep bellowing toms all mixed up by what sounds like 2 or 3 different parts - all sown frantically together. 

I´d say the only downside to this album, is a small nuisance - a petty mistake, but it still gets me a little frustrated every time I listen to it: There are some abrupt pauses during the middle section of the second track. They change the scope of the record, and those charming sonic cycles are suddenly broken - again and again, where the music fades out and into silence. It doesn´t work for me. I find this rather peculiar and close to a mind fart, because the music that follows is quite extraordinary - as we are treated to a sky-high reaching moog that swoops through the droning notes like some untamed majestic bird of prey headed for the outskirts of a sapphire blue horizon. Like I said, it is the sole negative thing about the record, but it´s still there, if only for those brief 30 seconds. 

I recommend Cycles to fans of Klaus Schulze´s more melodic work, Tangerine Dream, Vangelis and newcomers to the genre. This is a perfect way to start exploring what the progressive electronic world has to offer. It is breathtaking like skydiving without a parachute. 4.5 stars….by Guldbamsen ….~

Wolfgang Bock’s debut album Cycles is a perfect representation of a more accessible Berlin school style electronic album. This album contains the floating analog synths and repetitive percussive loops that would be expected from music of this sort by the likes of obvious forerunners of this style, Klaus Schulze and Tangerine Dream, but Cycles has a certain energetic attractiveness that fans of even more modern electronic music would be able to easily comprehend without finding the music boring and long-winded. 
The first half of this album, containing the title track and a portion of “Robsai Part 1” rely on the aforementioned repetitive percussive loop that drives on as the floating synths create and explore the soundscape given. A wonderful and attention grabbing (long) introduction to this journey. 

“Robsai Part 2” is an electronic organ type of interlude that is similar in sound to the organ- enhanced music of Klaus Schulze’s fantastic album Cyborg. Very brooding yet ethereal, very dark yet uplifting. A fantastically moody, though short track. This leads into “Changes” which trades out the electronic percussion of the first movements of this album for organic and almost tribal sounding percussion as nearly imperialistic or royal sounding synth melodies fly above, but at the halfway point the track takes a turn for low-register, dark, brooding rumbling that morphs into choppy and forceful synth patterns. 

The last movement, “Stop the World”, starts off with gloomy but energetic synth loops exacerbated by steadily driving percussion as dark cascading synth melodies and solos take the forefront that make this track sound like an epic final battle scene of a horrific sci-fi film. The track eventually dies down into somber organ noodling that sounds similar to the electronic music portion of The Mars Volta’s track “Asilos Magdalena” that floats atop airy and spacey ambient droning, until finally ending with the sounds of electronically manipulated church bells that fade off into the distance. 

Even though Cycles by Wolfgang Bock is one of the lesser discussed albums, by a rarely discussed artist, I would feel very comfortable recommending this album to be one of the first if not the first Berlin School electronic album that someone unfamiliar with this genre should hear (ProgArchives collaborator Guldbamsen mentioned in his review that this was one of his first progressive electronic albums). Because of its perpetual energy and overall accessibility compared to other great albums of this genre, I think that Cycles is an important and standout album of this era even if it is mostly ignored…… by Guldbamsen ..~

Wolfgang Bock’s debut album Cycles is a perfect representation of a more accessible Berlin school style electronic album. This album contains the floating analog synths and repetitive percussive loops that would be expected from music of this sort by the likes of obvious forerunners of this style, Klaus Schulze and Tangerine Dream, but Cycles has a certain energetic attractiveness that fans of even more modern electronic music would be able to easily comprehend without finding the music boring and long-winded. 
The first half of this album, containing the title track and a portion of “Robsai Part 1” rely on the aforementioned repetitive percussive loop that drives on as the floating synths create and explore the soundscape given. A wonderful and attention grabbing (long) introduction to this journey. 

“Robsai Part 2” is an electronic organ type of interlude that is similar in sound to the organ- enhanced music of Klaus Schulze’s fantastic album Cyborg. Very brooding yet ethereal, very dark yet uplifting. A fantastically moody, though short track. This leads into “Changes” which trades out the electronic percussion of the first movements of this album for organic and almost tribal sounding percussion as nearly imperialistic or royal sounding synth melodies fly above, but at the halfway point the track takes a turn for low-register, dark, brooding rumbling that morphs into choppy and forceful synth patterns. 

The last movement, “Stop the World”, starts off with gloomy but energetic synth loops exacerbated by steadily driving percussion as dark cascading synth melodies and solos take the forefront that make this track sound like an epic final battle scene of a horrific sci-fi film. The track eventually dies down into somber organ noodling that sounds similar to the electronic music portion of The Mars Volta’s track “Asilos Magdalena” that floats atop airy and spacey ambient droning, until finally ending with the sounds of electronically manipulated church bells that fade off into the distance. 

Even though Cycles by Wolfgang Bock is one of the lesser discussed albums, by a rarely discussed artist, I would feel very comfortable recommending this album to be one of the first if not the first Berlin School electronic album that someone unfamiliar with this genre should hear (ProgArchives collaborator Guldbamsen mentioned in his review that this was one of his first progressive electronic albums). Because of its perpetual energy and overall accessibility compared to other great albums of this genre, I think that Cycles is an important and standout album of this era even if it is mostly ignored…..by colorofmoney91 ….~


The Berlin School of vintage progressive-electronic music is almost always comprised of slow- paced, vague albums prizing atmosphere over focused melodic and approachable compositions, right? Not always, as latecomer German composer Wolfgang Bock’s debut `Cycles’ from 1980 chooses to attack with a power and force to dominate the more drifting, ambiguous works from his contemporaries of the time! Released after the boom-period of the style yet still produced by Klaus Schulze (who’d really moved on from this sort of electronic approach by this point), `Cycles’ is frequently up-tempo and energetic in favour of delicate ambience and subtlety, whilst also adding several surprising symphonic-influenced elements as well - with mixed results! 
The opener title track `Cycles’ is dramatic and imposing, yet not overwhelmingly dark or hostile and with a constant breathless momentum. An ocean of unceasing and upfront broad layers of synths wash over cosmic effects swirling in and out, infernal Mellotron choirs cry out, and looping sequencer patterns take on a frantic fast-paced urgency. A relentless live drumbeat, bleeding synth veils and stormy electronic rumbles move into dreamier mysterious shimmers, with a gentle melancholic theme emerging in the final moments. 

A regal treated organ theme announces the second side and two-part `Robsai’ with grandiosity, a runaway maddening sequencer trickle unravelling around a stirring Mellotron choir, but it’s a shame the piece fades out after barely two minutes and abruptly ends. More symphonic synth grandness prances amongst galloping live drums throughout the second part that perhaps wouldn’t have sounded out of place on a Seventies Rick Wakeman album, but after an intrusive complete stop, a groaning synth drone ebbs and hums into life in `Changes’ alongside a building sequencer pattern filled with potential, only to come crashing down with infuriating stop-start moments before ceasing altogether ? what a letdown! Thankfully the ten-minute `Stop the World’ picks up the slack again with unravelling sequencer runs gurgling with intensity over loud whirring soloing synth cascades. Spectral organ and a returning Mellotron choir turns embracing and uplifting, almost acting as a similarly victorious finale as Pink Floyd’s `A Saucerful of Secrets’, but a drowsy distorted bell-toll closes the disc in a very discomforting manner. 

It’s not the deepest, most thoughtful or subtle of vintage electronic works, but `Cycles’ always sounds terrific and addictive on the surface, a thick slab of cosmic sonic ear candy if you will! While some sections (more or less a majority of the second side) have a confused sense of identity and are made up of little fragmented ideas that had endless potential had they been developed further, the mix of symphonic themes, live and programmed beats and confident electronic excursions give the album an eclectic and exclusive sound, and Mellotron choirs have rarely sounded so full-bodied and impressive! If you’re a fan of the Berlin School-style of vintage progressive-electronic music, you’ll find plenty to interest you here, as well as a few unique (if questionable!) surprises along the way. 

Four stars all the same…and let’s hope for a nice CD reissue in the near future!…. by Aussie-Byrd-Brother …~

The musician Wolfgang Bock comes from the environment of Klaus Schulze, and his 1980 debut “Cycles” is heavily influenced by this. Information about Wolfgang Bock is hard to find on the internet, so the band side is very sparse. Meanwhile, Wolfgang Bock no longer seems to be active as a musician. 

The title track, which occupies the entire first album page in the vinyl edition, is still entirely in the tradition of the Berlin School. Slowly wafting sound bows and mystical Mellotron choirs mark the beginning of the piece. After a while, the typical sequencer rhythm sets in, supplemented by a real drums, and brings the piece more in motion. Apart from a short, rhythm-free sequence, this tempo is then maintained until just before the end of the piece. 

So far, you could viciously call “Cycles” a “Schulze clone”. On the second page Wolfgang Bock proposes but more independent sounds. Incidentally, I am not sure if the pieces on the second side of the sheet are to be considered as separate pieces or as parts of a long piece - this is not quite clearly listed on the record sleeve. 

The first part of “Robsai” consists mainly of powerful organ sounds, while the second part is reminiscent of some things by Vangelis (such as “Albedo 0.39” or “Spiral”): Jubilant synth sounds, accompanied by heavy drumming. From about the middle of the piece, the synthies fade away, and the rest of “Robsai Part II” forms a pure drum solo. 

Where exactly the border between “Changes” and “Stop The World” is, I’m not sure. In any case, here are reminiscent of Vangelis reminiscent synth sounds, some of which have a bit scratchy and almost aggressive, again accompanied by wild drums. 

All in all a worthwhile record, which escapes especially in the second half of the great role model Klaus Schulze. On CD “Cycles” does not seem to be available at the moment…..by…. Jochen Rindfrey…~

One of the few leaders by Wolfgang Bock, the cult, German, and synthsist, the 1st album released in 1980. Produce is Olga Klaus Schulze, it is exactly the heavy and deep synth picture scrolls of the teacher (especially in the early days) - electronic locks developed. Wolfgang Bock plays all the sound sources except the two drummers, a cosmic tone with Roland’s modular system as the core is wonderful, especially the big work “Cycles” using all the A side is masterpiece. Outer space lock almost same quality as the current Zombi….~

Wolfgang Bock is a German musician. His real name is Wolfgang von Pappritz. In earlier days as product manager for Roland Europe he gave courses in playing synthesizers and Studio techniques all over Europe. From 1981 till 1984 he studied sound-engineering. From 1984 till 1988 he studied Physics. Nowadays he is a cameraman, sound engineer and sea-traveller ( He built his own ship! ) Wolfgang bock composed and produced three cds . ( Cycles(1980) , Biscaya Sunset ( 1995) and Mettle water ( 1997 ) Mettle water contains very melodic romantic Electronic Music. Very calm, relaxing music. The whole album Mettle water breaths calmness, relaxation….~

Wolfgang Bock comes from the environment of Klaus Schulze, and his 1980 debut ,“Cycles ”, is heavily influenced by him. He is a German wizard of cosmic electronics in the direction of early experiments of the Berlin school. This album is full of beautiful sequencer-driven melodies made with the roland system 100 instrument and the mellotron and supported by real drums…..~


Line-up / Musicians 
- Wolfgang Bock / All electronics and effects

Songs / Tracks Listing 
Side A 
1. Cycles (18:49) 

Side B: 
1. Robsai Part 1 
2. Robsai Part 2 
3. Changes 
4. Stop The World (17:56) 

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