Saturday, 6 January 2018

Heather Black “Heather Black” 1978 Texas Private Southern Psych Hard Blues Rock 2 LP`s


Heather Black “Heather Black” 1978  Texas Private Southern Psych Hard Blues Rock 2 LP`s
full
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1wTzEDFyha0


“Greatful Death meets Allman Brothers and Little Feat” long Killer tracks with wild guitar.


Credits 
Bass, Vocals – Jimmy Jones (6) 
Drums, Vocals – Doug Lavery 
Engineer – Bert Frilot, Ollie Perry 
Lead Guitar, Vocals – Tommy Christian 
Lead Vocals, Rhythm Guitar – Gaylan Latimer 
Organ – Wayne Brooks (2)


Tracklist 
A1 Most Peculiar 2:58 
A2 Get Out Of My Life Woman 4:20 
A3 No Sad Songs 2:34 
A4 We All Got To Help Each Other 3:30 
A5 Lead It On 5:19 
B Rock & Roll 15:30 
C1 Lucille 2:50 
C2 California Dreamin 7:38 
C3 Come On And Get It 3:40 
D Seeing Is Believing 9:20 

High Street "Down To The Brown" 1981 US Private Prog Rock


High Street  "Down To The Brown" 1981 US Private  Prog Rock
full
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9SX8wpNLy08


a Jersey band. High Street played rough-edged AOR with a heavy touch of psych –despite the fact that they looked like a typical Jersey Shore bar band…


Tom Cianflone - keys, vocals 
Robert De Santis - lead vocals, percussion 
Greg Strollo - horns, vocals 
Larry Francis - guitars, vocals 
Anthony Wayne - bass, vocals 
Tony Tomaino - crusm, vocals






1. Street Angel 
2. Starting Line 
3. Southern Lullaby 
4. Silverball 
5. You keep on Rockin’ 
6. Music Man 
7. Thinking Back 
8. Born a Lady 
9. Journey 
10. Just can’t be love 
11. Trackin me down 

Colosseum “Time On Our Side” 2014 UK Prog Jazz Rock


Colosseum “Time On Our Side” 2014 UK Prog Jazz Rock
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To play a new Colosseum album is to step into the unknown. Anything could happen. All bets are off. While less questing bands are content to issue fading photocopies of their best-selling work, latest album Time On Our Side is the sound of old friends embarking on new adventures. “We never try to recreate the past,” says drummer Jon Hiseman, who co-founded the pioneering British group in 1968. “So the music has changed again, and anyone hoping for Son of Valentyne is in for a shock. Having said that, I think Colosseum sounds like no other band. This unlikely collection of writers and performers seems to have a ‘Colosseum’ effect on the music…” Released on Ruf Records in 2014, Time On Our Side walks a creative tightrope, stretching the genre-blurring band’s palette while always showing their inimitable thumbprint. The jiving jump-blues of City Of Love. The shape-shifting jazz of Dick’s Licks. The stacked harmonies of You Just Don’t Get It. The melancholy ache of New Day. It feels like Colosseum, even if it doesn’t always sound like them. Hiseman cites the original mission-statement as “rocky, jazzy rhythms, vocals with intelligent words, improvised solos” - but in truth, there’s not a pigeonhole in the world that can contain them. Eleven years have passed since Tomorrow’s Blues: a lifetime in rock 'n’ roll. Time On Our Side may have been a pleasure to record, at Hiseman’s own Temple Music Studio in Surrey, yet its completion marks the end of a period of some uncertainty. “We started it in 2010 by meeting in the studio and playing through demos that had been written by the bandmembers,” the drummer remembers. “But after 2010, the future of Colosseum was always going to be decided by whether Barbara would be able to tour again…” Of course, multi-instrumentalist Barbara Thompson is a vital part of the Colosseum story. She and Hiseman met in 1964, then married in 1967, and during the band’s first run, she played - albeit uncredited - on the first three albums. Colosseum split in 1971, and Thompson led her own outfit, yet she remained a close ally, and when the reunited band lost original saxophonist Dick Heckstall-Smith in 2004, she stepped up. “Dick was a great admirer of Barbara,” recalls Hiseman, “and she was the obvious choice. He was a rough, tough masculine player who took no prisoners. Barbara tells a softer, more feminine story and we get more girls in the audience. No complaints!” Undoubtedly, Thompson’s sax lines are the fairydust on the new material, from Safe As Houses to The Way You Waved Goodbye. Yet there were times, says Hiseman, when the band feared her involvement might not be possible: “Her Parkinson’s progresses, and the medication becomes less effective, so she stops playing, then a new medication arrives and she picks up where she left off. This has happened three times now - and recording this album was stopped in 2012 because it looked as if she would never play again. When a new Swedish miracle drug arrived twelve months ago, we decided to go for it, maybe one last time: finish the album and tour again.” The completion alone of Time On Our Side, then, is a towering achievement. That this new album is so dazzlingly successful is testament to the enduring genius of one of Britain’s most inventive lineups. Almost a half-century after Colosseum’s formation, this is unmistakably the sound of a band with gas still in the tank and endless lightbulbs popping over their heads. “I know that when we get together we all feel like we are coming home,” says Hiseman. “This album was easy to make and it just feels right…”….~


OK… I have bought and listened to every Colosseum album since 1969’s magnificent “Valentyne Suite”. 
And then the wonderful “Daughter of Time”, the stunning “Live”… and then the LONG G A P until the glorious Reunion Concert - all wonderful “tears-to-the-eyes” stuff… and the recent (but gentler) “Bread and Circuses” and “Tomorrow’s Blues”. 
This is a delicious album, and it reflects their maturity - less flash, less speed, but never-the-less this is Colosseum. 
So what have we here? The post Dick H-S world with the truly superb Barbara Thompson replacing his majesty. She is less raw and more lyrical than DHS - but she fits in perfectly (given that she has been playing with them for years!) 
The rest of the old codgers (which they are, if you think about it! Can’t be any of them under 60?) are still making beautiful music. Perhaps they are a little gentler, perhaps those drum fills are a little less energetic, perhaps we are all getting old. I know I am! 
Chris Farlowe is in good voice (and he started in 1957 - he must be getting on for 75) - and has a little help from his friends now and again… 
Dave Clempson hurls some great riffs out of his liquid guitar (one of the unsung guitar heroes… on a par with Mr. Gilmour) 
Dave Greenslade tootles about on the organ - nothing too exciting 
Mr. Hiseman ticks along, and I missed the excitement of his early work - just listen to the speed and accuracy of his drumming on the original “Live” album.
Mark Clarke carries on with his lovely underpinning bass lines 
I have listened to the album several times, and it purrs along - a bit of blues here, a bit of jazz there - nothing leaps out and grabs you - but the quality of the recording is excellent. 
Definitely one for the train, or a Sunday afternoon’s snooze in front of the fire, or a quiet dinner party. ….by….Mark Shackelford …amazon…~


Initially I thought this album was little “tame” compared to the old colosseum stuff but after a couple of listens it grew on me and is rarely off the deck for more than a few days. In my youth I enjoyed the excitement of the jazz/rock genre but I have mellowed over the years and it would appear that Jon and his mates have also taken a more laid back approach to their compositions and delivery. Now much more subtle and sophisticated. The musicianship remains impeccable and vibrant. I hope there will be another album in the future but health and the ageing process takes its toll, even for these legends….by… P. D. Roberts..amazon…..~


A welcome return for the progressive jazz rock outfit Colosseum who have overcome their collective health problems to record an album that pushes the stylistic envelope, and almost leaves them in search of an identity. 
Happily a combination of strong material and inspired playing ensures a coherent set worthy of their enduring musical cannon. 
Given the virtual collapse of the jazz rock and fusion market in the interim period between the band’s original dissolution and their comeback in 1994, the album title has an ironic ring about it. On their last studio album ‘Tomorrow’s Blues’ they traded their former progressive style for a more mature blues feel, but this album has a surprisingly broader sweep. 
‘Time On Our Side’ initially feels less accessible than it’s predecessor, but repeated plays reveals a greater musical depth, with deep grooves, shifting themes and expansive solos. Above all, veteran vocalist Chris Farlowe hits his stride from ‘Dick’s Licks’ onwards, while Pete Brown esoteric lyrics gradually become less impenetrable to blend in with the shifting musical landscape. 
The opening Hiseman/Thompson composition ‘Safe As Houses’ sets a high standard. It’s a keyboard led groove with poignant lyrics and some fine horn work from Barbara Thompson. 
In sharp contrast, ‘Blues To Music is a radical departure for the band, being a bluesy duet between Farlowe and the song’s writer, the Americana sounding Ana Gracey (Hiseman and Thompson’s daughter). Bolstered by potent bv’s and some discernible spark between both vocalists, the track blows away any doubters and gives the band another potential musical avenue. 
The cutely titled ‘The Way We Waved Goodbye’ fails to build on its initial bristling intent despite consecutive sax and guitar breaks and ultimately runs out of steam. ‘Dicks Licks’ is more interesting, being a restless laid back jazzy shuffle with characteristic tempo changes that ushers in lounge music and echoes of Steely Dan, before eventually settling into a groove that fades out too soon.. 
‘City Of Love’ is the album highlight. It evokes Brubeck‘s ‘Take 5’ on the introductory theme and leads to Chris Farlowe’s best vocal on the album. There’s a mix of double horn and guitar lines, backed by some startlingly good Crosby Stills & Nash style harmonies, all offset by Clemson’s sinewy guitar, on a song that flows beautifully. 
It’s almost as if the whole album has worked towards this one glorious moment when the band finally finds its unique oeuvre. And having done so, the combo leans into the bluesy song with some swagger, led by Hiseman’s crisp drumming which shapes the music and drives the band on relentlessly. 
The track is cleverly juxtaposed by Mark Clarke’s vocal piece ‘Nowhere To Be Found’. An exercise in cool restraint, the arrangement places the emphasis on the voice and sonic resonance, with a tinge of echo reverb. Each vocal inflection and carefully considered note brings an extra emotive nuance to a song glued together by Greenslade’s drifting organ line. 
There’s an essential ebb and flow to the sequencing, as evidenced by the uplifting feel of the slide-led Clemson/Brown composition ‘You Just Don’t Get It’. Its a slowly evolving, smoking blues on which Clem’s slide soars above Farlowe’s excellent phrasing and some Kokomo style bv’s. It’s destined to be a live favourite, and comes closest to embodying Colosseum’s current bluesy style. Barbara’s deep-toned solo is the icing on the cake on a superb track. 
Dave Greenslade’s sonorous ballad ‘New Day’ could have been written for Jack Bruce, albeit there’s an organ solo and the chorus sounds like The Band. Colosseum do actually include an ode to Jack, as they stretch out on the live version of Bruce’s ‘Morning Story’. The song may not have aged that well, but it’s given fresh life by a magnificent solo from Barbara Thompson. 
The two tracks are sandwiched by the original title track of the album ‘Anno Domini’. The gritty effort is padded with jazzy riffs, a fusiony mid-section and a horn led motif that will surely connect with older fans in search of jazz in their veins 
‘Time On Our Side’ is a slow burner, which brings rich reward with repeated plays. The title says it all really. We live in a world of instant, disposable downloads, while this is music that demands patience, endeavour and open mind. The bottom line is that those committed to putting in the listening time will find some great music……by Pete Feenstra …..~


Colosseum” is a British rock band that is regarded as one of the responsible bands for the development of progressive rock. The band was formed in 1968 by drummer Jon Hiseman, tenor saxophonist Dick Heckstall-Smith and bass guitarist Tony Reeves. All of them had previously played in John Mayall’s “Bluesbreakers”. In addition, Dave Greenslade (organist) and Jim Roche (guitar) are attracted. Jim Roche had played on only one track when he was replaced by James Litherland (guitar and vocals). “Colosseum” had their debut in Newcastle in 1969. The performance was recorded by the BBC Radio One DJ John Peel, for his radio program 'Top Gear’, so that the band immediately became well known. Their second album “Valentyne Suite” is considered their best album. Hereafter, in 1970 James Litherland is replaced by Dave “Clem” Clempson for the production of the album “The Grass Is Greener”. Tony Reeves is replaced by Mark Clarke and John Hiseman recruits singer Chris Farlowe (“Atomic Rooster”), so that Clempson can concentrate on playing guitar. In 1970 they release “Daughter Of Time”. In March 1971, the band gives a series of gigs, which are released on a live double album in that year. In 1975 Hiseman founded “Colosseum II”, a more jazz oriented clone, with Gary Moore as guitarist and Don Airey on keyboards. In 1994 a reunion tour took place, followed by the release of a CD and new studio material. Saxophonist Barbara Thompson (who is married to Jon Hiseman) becomes the replacement of Dick Heckstall-Smith who died in 2004. In April of this year, the band announces that they will be touring Europe again in 2014/2015. Their first performance will take place in Italy and their last in London. 

“Time on Our Side - MMXIV” (with the work name “Anna Domini”) is after more than forty-five years, the new (I suspect the seventh) studio album of “Colosseum”. The band started with the recordings in May 2011. The album contains ten songs, to which Barbara Thompson, Jon Hiseman, Clem Clempson and Dave Greenslade collaborated. Pete Brown is a British songwriter, who also wrote the lyrics of several songs. 

1 “Safe As Houses” opens the album with a kind of protest song, then in 2 “Blues To Music” special guest Ana Gracey, the vocals together with Chris Farlowe. Singer-songwriter Ana Gracey is the daughter of Jon Hiseman and Barbara Thompson. It is mainly the duets of both and the accents of guitarist Clem Clempson, who make something special from this track. In 3 “The Way You Waved Goodbye” it is mainly Dave Greenslade and the sax grooves of Barbara Thompson that stand out. 4 “Dick’s Licks” is a quiet public tribute to the late 2004 saxophonist Dick Heckstall-Smith. Then there is 5 “City Of Love”, which reminds me of Jazz Bilzen 1977, where “Colosseum II” still performed at the center on Friday 12 August. From their double live album from 1971, I knew their fantastic hit “Walking In The Park” and the super strong sax improvisations of Dick Heckstall-Smith. In the smooth jazzy 5 “City Of Love” vocalist Farlowe can go full-on and Mark Clarke’s strong bass line holds the cheek. This is undoubtedly my favorite song on the album. The subtle 6 “Nowhere To Be Found” together with the beautiful 8 “New Day” is one of the zen moments of the album. A typical “Colosseum” track with ditto sound thanks to Hiseman and Greenslade, it is spun out 9 “Anno Domini"that the valve 10 precedes "Morning Story”. This bonus track is a live version of Jack Bruce’s “Morning Glory” , a tribute to a man who meant so much for British jazz and blues! 

With “Time On Our Side” from “Colosseum” memories are literally brought to the surface and many fans will not have to be convinced with superlatives. 11 Years of waiting (partly due to Barbara Thompson’s illness) was worth it! Hopefully we can see them at work during the planned Europe tour, also on a Belgian stage …by…Eric Schuurmans….~


As well as giving label space to a considerable quotient of promising and energetic youthful bluesers, Ruf Records, less-frequently but admirably, gives encouragement to more mature pioneers who remain key to the development of the complex polygon that is modern blues. 

With Jon Hiseman, the late Dick Heckstall-Smith and Hammond pilot Dave Greenslade aboard, the first Colosseum tip-toed around ‘the blues’ at the jazzier end of its spectrum, the experimental and improvisational nature of recordings and gigs earning them the respect of prog fans into the bargain. The 2014 incarnation of the band sees Hiseman, Greenslade and fellow original member Clem Clempson aboard. They are supplemented by Hiseman’s wife, saxophonist Barbara Thompson, an occasional uncredited contributor to early Colosseum releases, bassman Mark Clarke and Chris Farlowe, both of whose history with Colosseum goes back to 1970. 

And it’s that same willingness to elbow their way out of genre straitjackets that defines Time On Our Side, where Colosseum are content to pick and mix licks and tricks from the rock n roll smorgasbord and beyond as their strong, well-structured songs demand. 

Clempson’s bluesy guitar coils around arrangements, with his contribution of tasteful and ethereal bottleneck snaking through the vocals on ‘You Don’t Get It’. His memorable, almost geometric guitar figure underpins a rousing rock climax to ‘Anno Domini’, the working title for the album, it seems, where Farlowe soars soulfully over almost Baroque keyboard and saxophone interplay. The singer’s album highlight is ‘City Of Love’, where Colosseum jazz swing perches solidly on Mark Clarke’s massive walking bass riff. 

Hiseman and Thompson’s daughter, singer and writer Ana Gracey guests, singing her own ‘Blues To Music’ with panache and soul. 
The band feels privileged to have Barbara still aboard as her constant battle with illness is a frequent limiter to recording and touring. Yet, she has rarely sounded freer and more energised than on Time On Our Side, scorching the reeds on ‘Safe As Houses’ and adding beautiful emotional brass embellishments from start to finish. 
Hiseman’s original vision for Colosseum was, ‘…rocky, jazzy rhythms, vocals with intelligent words, improvised solos”. 

Check...check...check...check. Check it out..... by David James Innes .....~


Funny title, Time on our side , for the band Colosseum on the scene since 1968 and that for eleven years, Tomorrow blues was in fact released in 2003, did not publish a new studio album. 

There are the two founding members Jon Hiseman on drums and Dave Greenslade on the Hammond organ and keyboards, and Clem Clempson guitar, Mark Clark bass and Chris Farlowe vocals, who have been part of the band since the 1970s with the release of the third album Daughter of time . Only Dick Heckstall-Smith saxophone is missing, which unfortunately left us in 2004, replaced by Barbara Thompsonwhich is also Jon Hiseman's wife. 

The Colosseums with their original fusion of rock-prog-jazz, where Dave Greenslade's keyboards and Dick Heckstall-Smith's saxophone played the main role, gave us at least two very large albums both released in 1969: Those who are about to die health you , their debut album, and the next Valentyne Suite . 

They broke up in 1971 leaving a good testimony of their live concerts with the double Colosseum live , reformed in 1974, dissolved again in 1978 and distributed in 1994 when they also resumed the recordings with three studio albums and several live and collected . 

There is their unmistakable trademark in this new work, nine tracks and a final bonus track live, but it is a surprisingly modern sound with veins also blues and soul, which resumes in many moments their classic and original style of a time keeping, as Jon Hiseman reminds us , the group's motto: "rock and jazz rhythm, music with intelligent lyrics and improvised solos". 

Great start with Safe as houses , rock-soul with an obsessive bass and Hammond riff, where Chris Farlowe's warm voice and Barbara Thompson's saxophone solos are grafted, the second song is Blues to music where Chris duet with Ana Gracey on a musical carpet made of blues and soul, while Dick's licks is the most jazzy song of the whole album, and City of love sways between blues and jazz and a succession of guitar, saxophone and organ. 

Also noteworthy is Anno Domini , the song that brings us closer to the first Colosseum , a synthesis of rock, jazz and prog, and New day with its melancholic and sweet pop atmosphere, a sure hit, a break between so many rhythms, music dense and sparkling with many solos. 

The finale is a tribute to Jack Bruce , who disappeared a few weeks ago, with a successful live version of one of his great songs, Morning story, an epic ride where Barbara's bravura on the saxophone also emerges. 

An honest, warm, pleasant record, well played by musicians with a long history and a great professionalism and a lot of passion that still have fun, after so many years, to make new albums and new regular tours, which will please the fans of the group but that it could also bring new fans to discover this historical group that has time, and good music, on its side....by Giuseppe Verrini....~ 


Credits 
Bass, Vocals – Mark Clarke (2) 
Drums, Producer – Jon Hiseman 
Guitar, Vocals, Keyboards, Producer – Clem Clempson 
Keyboards, Producer – Dave Greenslade 
Saxophone – Barbara Thompson 
Vocals – Ana Gracey (tracks: 2), Chris Farlowe

Line-up: 
Jon Hiseman * - drums (1968-1971, 1994-present) / bandleader 
Dave Greenslade * - Hammond organ, keyboards (1968-1971, 1994-present) 
Dave "Clem" Clempson - guitar, keyboards, vocals (1969 -1971, 1994-present) 
Mark Clarke - bass, vocals (1970-1971, 1994-present) 
Chris Farlowe - vocals (1970-1971, 1994-present) 
Barbara Thompson - saxophones (2004-present) 
Special guest: Ana Gracey: vocals (2) 

Former members: 
Dick Heckstall-Smith * - saxophones (1968-1971, 1994-2004 / died 2004) 
Tony Reeves * - bass (1968-1970) 
Jim Roche * - guitar (1968) 
James Litherland * - guitar, vocals (1968-1969) 
Louis Cennamo - bass (1970) 
* First 1968 members 



Tracklist 
1 Safe As Houses 4:25 
2 Blues To Music 
Vocals – Ana Gracey 
4:55 
3 The Way You Waved Goodbye 5:11 
4 Dick’s Licks 4:29 
5 Nowhere To Be Found 4:40 
6 City Of Love 4:25 
7 You Just Don’t Get It 6:29 
8 New Day 3:53 
9 Anno Domini 6:04 
10 Morning Glory (Bonus Track) 7:22 

Messengers "Children Of Tomorrow"1977 Germany Jazz Rock Fusion second album


Messengers  "Children Of Tomorrow"1977 Germany Jazz Rock Fusion second album
full vk
https://vk.com/wall312142499_8619

full ok

https://ok.ru/group52564326285528/topic/66117764767960


Large ensemble with brass and woodwind instruments. A very heavy Christian “message” album, thus the name I suspect. Music is a mix of light jazz, complex horn rock, pop rock with female/male vocals and even some early disco with wordless female voice. Reminds me a little of late 70s Earth & Fire mixed with the Guntram Pauli + Christian Kabitz + Klaus Haimerl - “Rock Requiem: Concert For Orchestra Choir And Band…by…ashratom …~

Messengers is a large band from Berlin, led by trumpeter Bernhard Jobski. A sort of great ensemble of brass and woodwind instruments. Music is a mixture of light jazz, complex prog with a small add-on of pop rock with female and male vocals. Remotely reminiscent of Earth & Fire and Guntram Pauli of the late 70’s. The band recorded several singles and two very good, full-length albums. Particularly good is the second, Children of Tomorrow (Children of Tomorrow): a very complex, Christian album-a message, a tribute to Stravinsky and the Colony Suite. Most of the songs are written by Bernhard Jobski. Please note, this is the same person who wrote the symphonic masterpiece Einstein In Eden. 
In general, the music of this extraordinary group represents a constant ingenuity, consisting of a variety of musical ideas, incredible and beautiful flights of fusion-prog fantasy, excellent taste of musicians and simply beautiful melodies changing every 1-2 minutes. With each new listening the album opens with new faces. Unfortunately, both records have not been reissued on CD-ROMs yet. The band recorded on the labels Red Point and Warner Bros. Records. Disintegrated in 1977, most likely about the reason for the onset of the punk era and a new wave. Such music went out of fashion … At different times the Messengers musicians played in such bands as Georg Danzer Band, Firestone Band, Jazz Makers Berlin, Paul Kuhn und die SFB-Big Band, Lilli Berlin, Overground, Umbrella Jazzmen. Strongly invited to familiarize….~



Credits 
Bass – Earl Stanley Bostic* 
Cello – A. Lichtschlag, Gottfried Schmidt-Enders, Reinhild Oelmüller, Siegfried Gahlbeck 
Double Bass – Steven Zlomke, Wolfgang Burkmüller 
Drums – Olaf Gustafsson 
Flute, Flute [Alto] – Wolfgang Dünschede* 
Guitar, Violin [Electric] – Michael Gechter 
Horn – Engelbert Schmid, Georg Genschow, Hector McDonald 
Keyboards – Thomas Glanz 
Oboe – Björn Vestre 
Percussion – Joshua Heinemann, Stephan Holm* 
Producer – Gerhard Kämpfe 
Trombone – Ralf Armbruster 
Trumpet, Flugelhorn – Bernhard Jobski, Jürgen Scheele, Peter Tüllmann 
Violin – Abraham Jaffée, Antoine Saad, Erntraud Sasano, Eugen Maletzki, H.- O. Decke, Heinz Buschhagen, Jürgen Paarmann, Karl Plenge, Leonid Tscherniak, Matthias Roither, Rainer Koelble 
Violin [Tenor] – A. Koelble, Chaim Soloturski, Klaus-Ulrich Gebauer, Manfred Ziemann 
Vocals – Antonia Maass, Erling Jensen 
Vocals [Additional] – Dorothy Jamison 
Woodwind – Frank Lüdeke


Tracklist 
A1 Here Today - Gone Tomorrow 5:22 
A2 Sacrewinsky 12:46 
A3 Call It What You Like 5:28 
B1 Colony Suite 12:38 
B2 Funky Chick 6:29 
B3 Thank You For Love 4:05 



watch…
Messengers “First Message” killler…! 1975 Germany Jazz-Rock, Fusion ..recommended…! first album


https://johnkatsmc5.blogspot.gr/2017/12/messengers-first-message-1975-germany.html?spref=fb

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