Thursday, 19 July 2018

Jackie Mittoo “Macka Fat” 1971 Jamaica Reggae,Ska


Jackie Mittoo “Macka Fat” 1971 Jamaica Reggae,Ska
full vk
https://vk.com/wall312142499_11240


There are a dozen nice sultry instrumentals on this LP, released in the early ‘70s, though as always with vintage reggae albums, that doesn’t necessarily indicate that all of the material was recorded then. Certainly it has the sound of the best rocksteady music, some of its trancier grooves hinting at the dub era. Bubbly organ riffs are heard throughout, of the sort that, with some tweaks, would be popularized in the U.S. by Timmy Thomas’ 1973 hit “Why Can’t We Live Together.”… by Richie Unterberger….~



Het was ergens in februari 1986, Barrington Levy trad op in Paradiso 
Amsterdam. Ik was 28 jaar oud en met twee goede vrienden trokken 
we naar Amsterdam om hem te zien. Het werd een memorabele avond. 
Een van mijn vrienden, G.J. Kamer had toen nog een eigen radioprogramma 
bij de KRO, ‘Demo’ genaamd. Hij had de opdracht meegekregen om Barrington 
te interviewen, dus na de show werden we in de Vip Bus gevraagd die voor de 
deur van Paradiso stond. Gerard deed zijn interview en toen hebben we nog 
wat met die jongens gerookt en wat foto ‘s genomen. Hier onder zie je er een 
paar van Barrington en Jackie Mittoo. Ze zwaaiden ons nog uit bij het afscheid, 
al met al een avond om nooit meer te vergeten..wat een aardige jongens.. 

It was somewhere in february 1986, Barrington Levy performed in Paradiso 
Amsterdam. I was 28 years of age and with two close friends went to see him. 
It became an evening to remember. One of my friends, G.J. Kamer still had his 
own show at KRO Radio in those days and brought a recorder to interview 
Barrington, so after the gig we were invited in the Vip Bus which was parked 
in front of Paradiso. Gerard did his interview and we stayed a while, smoking 
and taking some pictures. Below you’ll find some of them with Barrington and 
Jackie Mittoo. A memorable night all together, see how they 
waved us a happy goodbye…..~



Jackie Mittoo’s fifth and most popular album from 1972. Seminal reggae instrumentals with the famous Studio One heavy-bass sound….~






Tracklist 
A1 Henry The Great 3:25 
A2 Good Feeling 2:30 
A3 Macka Fat 3:00 
A4 Lazy Bones 3:11 
A5 Fancy Pants 3:35 
A6 Something Else 2:20 
B1 Happy People
B2 Purple Heart 2:36 
B3 Whoa Whoa 3:33 
B4 Division One 3:09 
B5 Ghetto Organ 4:00 
B6 Dad Is Home 3:15 

Wednesday, 18 July 2018

Q65 “We’re Gonna Make It"1970 Dutch Psych Garage Rock


Q65 “We’re Gonna Make It"1970 Dutch Psych Garage Rock
full vk
official website

http://q65.org/index.htm




In 1965 Joop Roelofs, Frank Nuyens and Willem Bieler decided to form a band together with bass player Peter Vink and Jay Baar. In the first months, a lot of time is spent learning to play blues standards. Willie Dixon, Bo Diddley and Robert Johnson are their favorites. Nuyens, Baar and Bieler are good at writing their own songs. The name of the band is conceived. The year of the founding with the letter Q before. The Q65 will start in May. The first performance is in the UTS in Scheveningen. Soon the reputation of the band in The Hague and surroundings is known. It is a rough tire with an unkempt appearance. Bieler's long hair stood out. They were compared to the English band The Pretty Things. The group rehearses in the roller skating rink the Eekhoorn at the Leyweg in The Hague. Peter Koelewijn is tipped and looks at a Q65 appearance. There is an audition at Phonogram in the Wisseloord studio. Under the direction of Peter Koelewijn, two recordings are made of their self-written songs. The recordings are so good that they decide to put them on the record. You're The Victor will be the first single, a rough and unpolished number. The hague English of Bieler stands out immediately. The b-side is the quieter And Your Kind. On March 5, 1966, the record in the Veronica Top 40. The highest ranking is number 11. Because of this success the career of the band is gaining momentum. Wout van Soest becomes the manager of the band and the gages go up. Under the direction of Peter Koelewijn, two recordings are made of their self-written songs. The recordings are so good that they decide to put them on the record. You're The Victor will be the first single, a rough and unpolished number. The hague English of Bieler stands out immediately. The b-side is the quieter And Your Kind. On March 5, 1966, the record in the Veronica Top 40. The highest ranking is number 11. Because of this success the career of the band is gaining momentum. Wout van Soest becomes the manager of the band and the gages go up. Under the direction of Peter Koelewijn, two recordings are made of their self-written songs. The recordings are so good that they decide to put them on the record. You're The Victor will be the first single, a rough and unpolished number. The hague English of Bieler stands out immediately. The b-side is the quieter And Your Kind. On March 5, 1966, the record in the Veronica Top 40. The highest ranking is number 11. Because of this success the career of the band is gaining momentum. Wout van Soest becomes the manager of the band and the gages go up. On March 5, 1966, the record in the Veronica Top 40. The highest ranking is number 11. Because of this success the career of the band is gaining momentum. Wout van Soest becomes the manager of the band and the gages go up. On March 5, 1966, the record in the Veronica Top 40. The highest ranking is number 11. Because of this success the career of the band is gaining momentum. Wout van Soest becomes the manager of the band and the gages go up.The second single will be The Life I Live with a b- side Cry In The Night.The recording is in May 1966. The song is written by Jay Baar on the houseboat at the Soestdijksekade in The Hague. With this song the Q65 is really popular. The first wall paintings are created in The Hague. Q65 is painted on the wall at various locations in the city. The release of the new single is accompanied by a spectacular crossing in a dinghy from London to Scheveningen. At first they would still perform in London. Since no work permit was requested, the Q65 was not allowed to work there. The band first does Radio City. Because of the rough sea the Q65 had to change to the boat during the trip. At Scheveningen, the members of the Q65 stepped back into the rubber dinghy to be overtaken as heroes by their fans. Then the Q65 gives a smashing performance on the Scheveningen Pier. The name Q65 is now widely known. The weekly Revue writes a negative article about the boat trip. The group now appears in various TV programs. The Q65 is among others in Voor de Vuist Weg by Willem Duys. The Life I Live is the biggest hit and stands 14 weeks in the top 40 with the highest ranking the 5th place ...~




Q65 was one of The Nederlands most popular beat bands from the 60's. After their glory years, that ended abruptly when singer Willem Bieler joined the army, the band reformed in the spring of 1970, with drummer Beer Klaasse of the legendary Group 1850 behind the kit. They secured a recording contract with Negram and released the renowned albums Afghanistan and We're Gonna Make It, which are worth a fortune in the original versions! Afghanistan sounded terrible when it was released, because of a bad pressing. That's why for this re-release Pseudonym has decided to digitally freshen up the original recording tapes. Thanks to a crystal clear remastering the songs sound like they never did before. 
In the second part of their career, The ‘Kjoe' has developed immensely on a musical and technical level, and you can hear that very well! Longplayer Afghanistan opens with the instrumental Injection, that blasts from the speakers. I'm Glad, with rolling drum intro, has improved incredibly in this remastered version. One whole album sidewas filled with the recording of a live performance in club Sarasani, on the island of Texel. As a bonus Graveyard Train has been added, a Creedence Clearwater Revival song, that was never before released by Q65. Special guests on this album are Barry Hay and Rinus Gerritsen of Golden Earring. 
We're Gonna Make It is the Q65 compilation album with all A- en B-sides of their Negram singles and some leftovers from the recording sessions for Afghanistan. These recordings have also been digitally refreshed and remastered. As a bonus on this album you will find the single Love Is Such A Good Thing. The come-back of Q65 started in March of 1970 with the single Don't Let Me Fall and Sexy Legs was their hit single in October. ....~














Tracklist 
A1 We're Gonna Make It
A2 Love Is Such A Good Thing
A3 I Just Can't Wait
A4 Saddy
A5 Please Come Back To Me
A6 We Are Happy
B1 I Gotta Move
B2 There Was A Day
B3 Don't Let Me Fail
B4 Crumblin'
B5 Night
B6 Sexy Legs 

Tamikrest "Adagh" 2010 Africa Mali Desert Blues,Tuareg Rock


Tamikrest "Adagh" 2010 Africa Mali Desert Blues,Tuareg Rock
full spotify
https://open.spotify.com/album/0NCZHorNT5GUmCcT2nbCU4

full dezeer

https://www.deezer.com/en/album/6388047

full bandcamp

https://tamikrest.bandcamp.com/album/adagh


Tamikrest, a seven-member group from North Mali, brings almost the same music as their compatriots. You immediately recognize the typical desert guitars, the hypnotic rhythms and the polyphonic Arabic vocals. But they do more than just copy. Tamikrest goes a step further. They use drums and their guitars sound more dirty. As a result, their sound is closer to a Western rock and blues sound than that of their examples. In addition, they deliver a series of songs with the same amount of flexibility and craftsmanship that can stand next to Tinariwen's. They are certainly not copycats but continuers and innovators of a tradition that has already produced a lot of beautiful music. You should already be at the record farmer!...~


Tamikrest is currently one of the hottest acts in "world" music today. Though their music takes root in Ishumar Rock or Touareg Blues, it borrows from various international influences as well as from neighbouring cultures. Tamikrest in Tamasheq language means junction, connection, knot, coalition. The group members come from different horizons (Mali, Niger, Algeria). Wanting to assume fully their Touareg identity, they found in the rebel music Ishumar the means to express it. Part of a new generation of Saharan guitar bands emerging from the nomadic Touareg community, singing about their struggles, suffering and hopes in the Tamasheq language. This African blues rock has inevitable echoes of the loping, rhythmic guitar style of the now-massive Tinariwen...~



Tamikrest are a group of young Touareg musicians from the far north of Mali, where the parched landscape forms part of the Sahara desert. Their name means ‘the knot, junction or coalition’, a reference to the fact that the members hail from different regions, and ‘Adagh’ is another name for the Touareg, who are also referred to by their language, Tamashek. 

They’re being dubbed ‘the spiritual sons of Tinariwen’ – the original exponents of the ‘Ishumar rock’ (Touareg rebel music), and right from the first notes of this debut album, it’s obvious who they’ve modelled their music on. If you’re a Tinariwen fan who just can’t wait for their next disc, Adagh is very much cut from the same cloth, with a few minor differences. 

While Tinariwen have four lead vocalists and writers, Tamikrest’s Ousmane Ag Mossa is the sole featured singer and songwriter. His lyrics follow much the same themes as theirs, though, focussing most often on the Touareg struggle for self determination as an oppressed group in contemporary Malian society. Many Touareg have spent their lives in exile, after fleeing the fallout from one of several rebellions that have sparked off since Mali gained independence in 1959. 

Like Tinariwen, Tamikrest’s default groove is an agreeably relaxed (and relaxing) lope that suggests a perambulating camel, typified by the likes of Amidini and Adounia Mahegagh. On most tracks Ousmane Ag Mossa’s simple, gnarled lead guitar is backed by two other rhythm guitars, providing a drone or subtle waves of reverb. What distinguishes them from their icons are Cheikhe Ag Tigly’s rather mobile bass lines (which are perhaps a little too high in the mix) and the frequent introductory ululations by female backing singers Fatma Walette Cheikhe and Bassa Walette Abdamou. 

There are a few discreet and respectful contributions from members of the American band Dirtmusic, who Tamikrest met at the well-known Festival in the Desert in 2007. The most obvious of these is the atmospheric slide guitar by former Bad Seed Hugo Race on Toumastin, while the band’s Chris Eckman is credited as producer. 

Adagh isn’t an especially ground-breaking record, but it’s good to know there’s a whole new generation of Touareg rockers more or less following Tinarwen’s distinguished tracks through the Saharan sands....by....Jon Lusk..BBC review...~


“As far as I’m concerned, it’s Tinariwen who created the path,” declares Ousmane Ag Mossa, frizzy-locked leader of Tamikrest, in a pre-emptive strike against a thousand inevitable questions. “But the way I see it, if younger bands don’t come through, then Touareg music will eventually die. They created the path and now it’s up to us to walk down it and create the future.” 

Ousmane was born twenty-seven years ago in a village called Tin-Zaouaten, a solitary speck squeezed up against Mali’s northeastern border with Algeria. It’s a remote marginal place. Or to put it another way: there’s distant, there’s remote and beyond both of those there’s Tin-Zaouaten. 

To an outsider, the village would appear to be nothing more than a motley collection of one storey adobe and breeze-block houses, huddling together for protection against the burning sun, the black rocky hills and the lonely immensity of the surrounding desert. But to Ousmane, it’s home. 

Like its ‘neighbour’ Tessalit, two hundred and fifty kilometres to the west, Tin-Zaouaten is blessed with a water table that lurks benignly just below the surface of the gritty soil. Dig a few metres and you can usually find water in abundance. That’s why Tin-Zaouaten, or ‘Tinza’ for short, is famed in the desert for its gardens and garden produce. Ousmane’s father Mossa was born a nomad out in the bush, but by the time Ousmane arrived he had settled in Tinza, making a living from growing onions, beetroot, carrots and dates, and selling them in the local markets. 

In 1985 drought shook desert life to its core. The rains had failed for several seasons and the village was haunted by famine. “I was born in a time of calamity,” says Ousmane. “In the middle of dreadful events for the Touareg people. My parents knew so much hardship. Then when I was five years old the rebellion broke out. It was 1990, the year of war. I was a child, and I used to hide in amongst the rocks with the other women and children, just a few kilometres north of the village over the Algerian border. When I think of that time, it’s as if it’s all still happening in front of me.” 

Thus Ousmane’s childhood was buffeted by the searing winds of recent Touareg history. The droughts of ‘68 to ’74 almost destroyed the animal herds and with them the ancient nomadic way of life of the Touareg. The drought of ’84 to ’85 almost dealt the final blow. Thousands of young men fled into exile in Algeria, Libya, Burkina Faso and beyond. That’s where the modern Touareg guitar style of music was born and then nourished by anger, homesickness, frustration and dreams of a better life. It was this generation of Touareg men, known as the ishumar, who returned to Mali and Niger in 1990 to rebel against the callousness, corruption and arrogance of the governments in the distant capitals of Bamako and Niamey. 

At first Ousmane just listened to traditional Touareg music at home, and the newer guitar music on battered old cassettes. “I well remember hearing my first Tinariwen songs. I was about five. After the death of my mother, my father was obliged to take me to live with my grown-up sister. One morning I was sitting in front of the house and this guy walked by singing a song by Inteyeden called ‘Imidiwan Kel Hoggar’ (‘My Friends the Hoggar People’). It went straight into my brain…ha ha ha.” 

A few years later Ousmane began to play the guitar himself, and write songs. He was attending a school in Tinza called Les Enfants de l’Adrar, set up by a French NGO and a local man turned community leader called Hama Ag Sid Ahmed. At the end of every school year the children would create and perform musical plays about pressing themes like ignorance, drought, education and culture. 

Hama bought the school an acoustic guitar, and Ousmane adopted the instrument. With his constant friend Cheikh Ag Tiglia, he would write songs and perform them at the school shows. He learned the Tamashek guitar style by listening to a particular cassette which Tinariwen’s leader Ibrahim ‘Abaraybone’ had recorded in Algeria back in 1998. 

In 2002, events once again undermined the tenuous calm and stability in Tinza. The village was home to one of the southern desert’s most infamous freedom fighters and warlords, Ibrahim Ag Bahanga. For this reason it became a military no-go zone. Ousmane’s father left to live with his eldest sons in Libya, and both Ousmane and Cheikh went south to Kidal 

Kidal is the capital of the far north east of Mali, a region known as the Adagh des Iforas (‘The Mountains of the clan Iforas’). With its wide sandy streets and dispersed one storey earthen houses, Kidal has the feel of a frontier town. For the Adagh Touareg, it’s where it all happens. 

Ousmane and Cheikh played the guitar and sang in hidden corners of Kidal, around a fire, drinking bittersweet Touareg tea with their friends. Their reputations grew very slowly, steadily, without wild leaps or fanfares. After a while they heard that a local cultural centre called the DDRK or ‘Maison du Luxembourg’, founded by the Duchess of Luxembourg who had fallen in love with the town when she visited it in 2001, was offering music classes. The teacher turned out to be Juhan Ecaré, a musician from Ivory Coast. 

Then this French theatre troupe called La Calma arrived in town and enrolled over fifty young people to perform a massive theatre piece featuring sketches about a host of local issues. It went down a storm in January 2006 at a local festival called ‘The Saharan Nights of Essouk’. Although Ousmane didn’t take part in the project, claiming disinterest in theatre (“I’m a musician…theatre’s not my thing”), Cheikh went along and played with a local percussionist called Aghaly Ag Mohammedine and a bass player called Ibrahim Ahmed, aka ‘Pinnochio’ or ‘Pino’ for short. 

On their return, Pino proposed that they form a proper band and record a demo at a small studio, which had been set up at the Maison du Luxembourg. They also decided that they needed a name, and agreed on ‘Tamikrest’, which means the knot, the junction, the coalition, in Tamashek, the language of Touareg. “Each of us came from a different place, a different zone,” explains Ousmane. “Cheikh and I from Tinza. Aghaly and Mossa Maiga from Kidal. Pino from Gao. But we found each other and we had the same ideas, the same intentions. We were like a coalition.” 

On the 23rd May 2006, the army garrison in Kidal was attacked by a new Touareg rebel movement called the Alliance Démocratique pour le Changement (ADC). “It was a hard time for me,” remembers Ousmane. “I woke up early that morning and discovered that the town had turned into a nightmare. Those who wanted to join the rebels had already done so. But, in general, that wasn’t the choice of me and my friends. Because we’d never been in the army. We were musicians, not people who carry arms.” 

By the end of the year a fragile peace had been restored, although Tinza’s recalcitrant son Ibrahim Ag Bahanga refused to compromise and remained on the run with his own splinter militia. Tamikrest performed at the peace Forum in March 2007, when the Touareg rebels met with the Malian government and thousands of community representatives in Kidal to map out a way forward. 

The group were developing their style and their fan base, which consisted mainly of Kidal’s younger generation. They knew the Tamashek guitar style intimately, but they were also deeply into rap, metal, Maghrebi pop and afro-disco music from Ivory Coast. They had new tastes, new desires, new ambitions and Tamikrest was their band. 

Pino was quite a mover and shaker. In late 2007 he contacted Manny Ansar, the director of the now world-famous Festival in the Desert and clinched a gig for Tamikrest. The band found the money to transport themselves the 600 miles eastward to Timbuktu. In the silky dunes of Essakane they met Dirtmusic, a group of rock’n’roll veterans from the USA and Australia. It was one of those meetings fashioned by fate in the workshops of destiny. 

Chris Eckman of Dirtmusic remembers the meeting thus: “On our first morning in Essakane we woke up hearing music, so we went across the sand to the tent opposite ours and that’s where Tamikrest was playing. Chris Brokaw grabbed his dobro and headed over, then Hugo and I eventually did the same and basically for three days we didn’t leave.” 

Once again music overflew all barriers of language, culture, style, shyness and reticence. The friendship formed at Essakane grew in the following months and lead to an invitation by Dirtmusic to come to the Malian capital Bamako to make an album, and contribute to Dirtmusic’s own oeuvre. After another epic journey of 1,200 miles, by car and bus, Ousmane, Aghaly and crew entered their first professional studio and ‘Adagh’ was born. 

“It felt very natural to play with Dirtmusic,” asserts Ousmane. “I’ve always appreciated all kinds of different music and it was such a pleasure to play with a different kind of band. Music isn’t something you study; it’s something you learn with your ears. I’d been listening and playing along to Bob Marley, to Marc Knopfler and Dire Straits, to Tinariwen for years. We’d been listening to so much international music and that’s why the marriage with Dirtmusic worked.” 

The end of 2009 finds Tamikrest on the cusp of the world and the next chapter in their great adventure. “This opportunity to go to Europe feels like a big responsibility,” says Ousmane. “I feel like someone who’s done this exam and is now waiting for the result. We’ve already achieved quite a bit, but the hardest is still ahead.” 

One thing is certain: Ousmane is clear about the band’s mission. “The situation of the Touareg is very difficult right now,” he declares. “Even before I played the guitar and started recording, I had this ambition to be a lawyer or you might say, an ‘advocate’. I wanted to be capable of expressing the hurt I felt in my heart, and speak out about the situation, even at the United Nations. Because we’re a people who don’t have journalists, we don’t have advocates. But it was only later that I realised that a musician can play that role.” 

“What is the weakest part of any nation or people? It’s ignorance. We are stuck in our ignorance. I see the world changing, racing ahead, and leaving us behind. And the only thing that is holding us back is our ignorance. As artists, it’s our duty to make our problems known to the world, to sing songs about the nomadic life, about our traditions and culture. But above all, revolutionary songs, about what we see, about what the government is doing to our people, which makes no sense to me.” 
There it is…Tamikrest, the knot, the coalition, the future. ....~


In English, the word ‘tamikrest’ means ‘junction’ – in this case the coming together of individual musicians from Algeria, Niger and Mali. Their need to assume a Tuareg identity is identified both in their music and the slogan “a desert holds us, a language unites us, a culture binds us.” 
For Western ears the inevitable comparison will be their fellow desert tribesmen Tinariwen, whose music has made such a heavy impact in its fusion of African culture and an ever so slightly Westernised take on the blues. 
The music Tamikrest make is almost as striking, if not perhaps as explicitly bluesy. Although the first few tracks feel like a call to arms, and are wonderfully uplifting in that way, a greater sense of emotion can be found in Aratane N’Adagh, where Ousmane Ag Mossa’s guttural vocal is pitched against a single guitar and a light percussion. 
Elsewhere the musicianship of the band is solemnly uplifting. Amidini has some nice guitar inflections, its rhythms leading to an almost involuntary case of head nodding. These rhythms are often in triple time and have an attractive lilt, helping the guitarist’s naturally spun yarns to unfold. 
The sound is noticeably less edgy than Tinariwen, and becomes quite luscious in Tamiditin. Meanwhile when the group unite vocally there is a real sense of bridges being built, the graceful intonations acquiring a subtle power. 
As the album progresses so does the sense of quiet contemplation and meditation, with occasional bursts of energy complemented by slower tracks with a lower vocal range. One such utterance, Toumastin, ends the album in an intravert but strangely uplifting fashion, the wandering guitar line providing a soft counterpoint. 
This is, you will have guessed, a natural point in the onward journey for anyone who has heard the music of Tinariwen and wishes to travel further into the region. The two bands shouldn’t be put against each other, but complement each other’s style, and only add to the desire for more music from Northern Africa to be released....by Ben Hogwood .....~


With Adagh , the 'spiritual sons' of Tinariwen convincingly follow in the footsteps of this, already legendary, saharablues / rock band. Like Tinariwen, Tamikrest sings in Tamasheq, the language of the Tuareg, nomads living in the Sahara and traveling through countries such as Nigeria, Algeria, Libya and Mali. Tamikrest exists since 2006, has seven members and has three different nationalities. Yet they all share the same Tuareg identity with their so characteristic Ishumar rock, the rebellious variant of Taureg music. 

The band name stands for 'connection', as they themselves say: 'The desert brings us together, the language twins and the culture connects us!' In 2008 during the Festival Of The Desert, they met the band Dirtmusic, a collaboration of Chris Eckman (The Walkabouts), Hugo Race (True Spirit) and Chris Brokaw (worked with Evan Dando / Sonic Youth) and tent in the tent. to hour-long jam sessions after drinking traditional Tuareg tea. The bands kept in touch and Dirtmusic came back to Mali to record their new album BKO , with the help of Tamikrest! This album will be released in the spring of this year. Chris Eckman was so enthusiastic about the sound and possibilities of Tamikrest that he flew to Mali again to produce their debut album Adagh . 

With opener Outamachek the tone is immediately set: a wonderfully repetitive guitar reef and mesmerizing ensemble vocals make for a catchy and impressive beginning. The following Aicha is perhaps even more beautiful because of the low (s) low vocals, the accompanying sounds / screams and the subtle clapping of the band members. After Amidini and the enthusiastic sounding highlight Tamiditin it is immediately clear that this saharasound is addictive. Then, with sensitive Aratane N'Adagh, clear gas is taken back to explain that the nomadic life also has its flip sides . 

Many songs tell about life in the desert, about denial by others of the hard life of the nomads and their problems. But despite the great sense of desolation and drought, people love their country (s) very much. Tahoult and Alhoriya have the same, but beautiful structure as the first four numbers and bring you back into trance. The title song Adagh sings about why the people of Adagh , who always believed in the same standards and values, started seeing each other as rivals. Toumastin's closing numberhas the same theme. The people are divided by conflicts and even your best friend may one day become your biggest enemy. No, a cheerful message is of course not this, but Tamikrest knows how to pack this convincingly. 

The excellent production of Chris Eckman will definitely have contributed to the accessibility of the album, but with Adagh Tamikrest shows that there is a lot of future in Tamasheq music!....By Robert Schuurman....~



Credits 
Backing Vocals – Bassa Walette Abdamou, Fatma Walette Cheikhe* 
Bass, Backing Vocals – Cheikhe Ag Tigly 
Calabash – Ibrahim Ahmed (tracks: #7) 
Organ – Chris Eckman (tracks: #5) 
Percussion – Chris Eckman (tracks: #2) 
Percussion, Drums, Backing Vocals – Aghaly Ag Mohamadine* 
Rhythm Guitar, Backing Vocals – Mossa Ag Ahmed, Mossa Ag Borayba 
Slide Guitar – Hugo Race (tracks: #11) 
Translated By – Melissa Wainhouse 
Vocals, Lead Guitar, Written-By, Photography By – Ousmane Ag Mossa


Tracklist 
A1 Outamachek 3:23 
A2 Aicha 4:15 
A3 Amidini 3:17 
A4 Tamiditin 3:37 
A5 Aratane N’ Adagh 5:10 
B1 Tidite Tille 3:51 
B2 Tahoult 4:14 
B3 Alhoriya 3:26 
B4 Adagh 3:07 
B5 Adounia Mahegagh 3:30 
B6 Toumastin 4:23

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