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Saturday, 31 March 2018

Fushitsusha “1st” 1989 Private double Lp Japan Psych Rock (100 greatest Japanese albums Rolling Stone)


Fushitsusha “1st”  1989  ultra rare Private double Lp Japan  Psych  monster …!  (100 greatest Japanese albums Rolling Stone)
full vk
full discography
Fushitsusha  “Allegorical Misunderstanding” 1993  
Fushitsusha  “悲愴” 1994
Fushitsusha “Purple Trap - The Wound That Was Given Birth To Must Be Bigger Than The Wound That Gave Birth” 1995
Fushitsusha  “The caution appears” 1995
Keiji Haino “ A Challenge To Fate” 1994
Keiji Haino & Lost Aaraaff  1981
Keiji Haino “Tenshi No Gijinka” 1995
https://vk.com/wall-29318096_13923

full discography on discogs

https://www.discogs.com/artist/65647-Fushitsusha

By Keiji Haino’s super group. Their best recording without a doubt and legendary to say the least. This LP followed his solo debut “Watashi Dake” on Pinakotheca Records. Housed in a black gatefold sleeve, this is the sole recorded document of the short lived four piece Fushitsusha line-up featuring Maki Miura on guitar, Ozawa Yashushi on bass and Murayama Seijiro on drums. Probably the most overtly straight-rockin’ of all Haino’s incarnations, especially with Fushitsusha. Heavily Hadake no Rallizes influenced, it is still staggering to hear Haino blasting away on harmonica on the disc’s opening track, which is in a way a dark, throbbing swamp rock infused piece of psychedelia. The rest of the disc is meditative psych-out bliss all over, freedom roaring and guitar brain melting overload. Haino’s voice endeavors embed, also all over this disc, some other worldly and meditative cloud splitting qualities…..~ 

Experimental Japanese rock band, formed in Tokyo by Keiji Haino in 1978. Many musicians have passed through the group, including bassists Jun Hamano, Yasushi Ozawa, Tori Kudo, and Mitsuru Nasuno, and drummers Takashima, Akui, Hiroyuki Usui, Seijiro Murayama, Jun Kosugi, and Ikuro Takahashi. 
Haino has also played outside Japan on several occasions, using local musicians including Charles Hayward, Trevor Dunn and Mike Pride. 
The group ceased activities during Yasushi Ozawa’s illness and subsequent death in 2008, though they started playing live again in 2011 and released a new studio album in April 2012….~

First of all, dig yourselves in for the ride, ‘cause the last track is really something. This assemblage of live jams is essentially an exercise in rock 'n’ roll purification, and some of the finest of old school psychedelic uproars too. When you think about it the whole vintage Japanese noise rock thing really is as legendary as people say. The approach, as set out by Les Rallizes Dénudés and Fushitsusha, was to concoct what sounds like an ominous, apocalyptic resurrection of the primal base of rock instrumentation, where the amps and the music really were turned up to eleven. This combination of stripped-back simplicity, the absurd levels of extremity and volume, the power to transcend reality while remaining completely chill as sheet ice, shades and all, is surely as rock and roll as it can get. Don’t take my word for it, I’m hardly well-versed in this genre and may as well be spouting utter crap, but instinct tells me this one is quite a special find in this particular field. 

It all begins with that archaic, crawling titan of a guitar riff, heralding the descent into far-out delirium. If you’re unprepared like I was initially, you’ll be worn out in minutes. But don’t give up! The way this track begins is actually perfect, the guitars positively drawl out each note before the drums and the rest of the band lumber up behind it. Surely the heaviest, most traditionally rooted of the set, but my does it groove. 

What lies beyond this, however is quite different. In particular there’s this beautiful sense of fragility conveyed in the quieter moments, revealing a level of dynamic that puts it considerably ahead of the Les Rallizes pack. It doesn’t bash you over the head with hours of repetition, rather it ebbs and flows between bewildered fury and spaced out catharsis. The guitar work in this regard is nothing short of stellar, almost confounding at times; and not so much musically, as how resolutely sincere this method of playing is. When Haino drifts into solo mode here, there are very few things quite as touchingly void-like and raw. Another aspect that I appreciate greatly are the vocals, an alien whelping that sounds so charmingly mad and forlorn among the chaos. 

But for me, it’s how this all builds up towards the last track, where the album’s true brilliance is realised. The kind of conclusion that other live rock albums can only dream of, koko represents a culmination of raw emotion, madness and sheer passion. It starts off manic and stumbling, but suddenly quietens down and gently drifts into this monstrous melancholic epic. I don’t think there are words for how good this piece actually is, all I know is that the final 10 minutes is straight-up some of the best music I have experienced; by god, I want to put the spotlight on this one track, just in the slightest chance that someone might feel what I felt, whatever it was. It tore me to shreds. I think its impact really lies in the complete opposition to the preceding material, a contrast of noise with what is at heart a life-affirming epiphany in the midst of despair. 

With this album one thing is for certain, they don’t bring the blazing hits of Les Rallizes Dénudés. It’s abrasive, it’s long-winded, but it’s a perfect example of psych and noise bound in blissful chaos, while remaining completely listenable. Somewhere along the line it just about won me over….by….clearmoon…~
I thoroughly love this album! It’s ethereal, dense, spectacular, terrific. I’ve derived almost all the vibes I ever wanted to experience. The adagios are gently sphered along with majestically made guitar riffs and mysterious initial echoey-voices. I always wanted to feel being an alien, especially when it comes to music. Fushitsusha just makes it all! I think that Fushitsusha perfectly reflects all those necessary attributions, which is why japanoise stands out as one of the greatest foundations in music history. Can’t finish my review without mention Keiji Haino, an absolute sound-magician, thank you for everything!..by…moozymathers …~

My first encounter with Keiji Haino. This has to be some of the most eerie psychedelic rock I’ve heard. Haino plays in a very dissonant style that brushes a soundscape with dark broad strokes. You can tell he’s been injected with some concoction of the blues in the way he solos during jams. The band does an excellent job of backing Haino and allowing him to shine, especially in the moments where he bursts out vocally or tears into his guitar. There are times when Haino’s vocals and guitar take the form of a specter in my mind, wandering endlessly in a big black nothing. 

The concept of “nothing” seems to play a large part in Haino’s music. The structure of the songs seem to be built on large gaps of silence and gentle strumming contrasted by Haino’s aural assaults. These gaps leave the listener wondering what lurks in the sonic darkness emitting from this band of wraiths. Haino answers with great volume and cathartic aggression. In some way, he effectively creates something from nothing which is part of the lesson to be learned here. Do not underestimate the potential of silence….by….Hemogoblin …~

The first release of Keiji Haino’s Fushitsusha project is rather unusual compared to their other albums. The double live album compilation, however, acts as a perfect introduction to the work of the Japanese magus and his colleagues. 

Unlike other Fushitsusha releases (and majority of Haino releases in general), Live I is firmly rooted in blues rock. Right from the opening Acchi we hear the howling harmonica along with a monster of a blues riff. By the end of the first piece, the listener can identify the major difference between this and another typical blues rock record. The piece the band performs is merely connected by a single riff and that’s about it. The piece FEELS alive and everchanging. The moment in that track that I truly admire is the final climax of the track, where Keiji Haino finalizes his solo and the band (almost lazily) moves onto the final riff resurgence. All the band members lose the grip between each other for several seconds but manage to hold their shit together. There is something very natural about the specific moment that manages to always thrill me like nothing else. The relationship between the band members is magical on this one. 

There are plenty of riffs (for the lack of a better word) here. They manage to keep a relatively “friendly” form with a clear blues-rock grounding and don’t move into Derek Bailey-esque improvisation that much, which tends to be Haino’s preference on most of his other releases. Another thing that stays relatively normal is the soloing. Suki ni Sureba Ii is a wonderful example of where Haino’s harmony is expressed with his pristine guitar tone that sounds like it has a soul of its own. There are counterbalancing noise rock shreds on this album as well, but even these sound nothing like Fushitsusha’s true psychedelic noise rock supernovas (Pathetique/Hisou would be a good example). 

There are vocals here too. Keiji Haino is a heck of a vocalist who concentrates a lot on breaking up syllables in songs and delivering each in a heartfelt manner, occasionally tearing his vocal cords and indulging into howls of his soul. He reaches absolute peak of revelation on the final track, Koko, where the entire band gathers their force to create one of a kind psychedelic epic with a gorgeous performance from every single component. While I prefer the solo version of this exact track from Haino, the build up to the final section makes this specific live performance of the piece special. The closing vocal performance from Keiji is heavenly and gorgeous. 

What sucks for me though is that Fushitsusha never really returned to this specific style of psychedelic blues rock. All the previous and further records are much more abstract and noisy, removing this intense concentration of leveling all the elements into a 100% coherent composition. This becomes more evident as you encounter different live versions of some of the pieces provided on this specific record further on in their career. This album is the true equilibrium of the band’s improvisational skills, making it one of the most unique records I have ever heard. The twin brother of this album (Live II) might look the same but it presents a different side of Fushitsusha. 

I have nothing but praise for this. This album is a statement of massive proportions. ..10/10……by….bksbeat ….~

A cornerstone of psychedelic rock 
As you probably determined from the title, this is a live album by the Japanese band Fushitsusha. One of the more prominent bands of the scene they were involved in, their style is considered psychedelic noise rock, though it’s almost difficult to assign a genre to it at points. The music is highly experimental, with long drawn out tracks typically composed of repetitive percussion and bass with guitar parts that range wildly from melancholy to panicked, and the band is not shy when it comes to putting these styles at center-stage. Each song is very distinct from the other, and just when you feel it may be becoming predictable, they switch things up into new sounds previously unheard throughout the songs. 

Live begins with an almost out of character blues-rock type jam that seems to derive a lot from western psychedelic and hard rock from the late sixties and early seventies, and soon makes a transition to acid rock when the vocals come in. Like every other song on this album, Acchi reaches a working groove that it works within the general confines of for the majority of the song. It’s in these periods of long improvisation where the album works its magic, and in its best moments it’s almost hypnotizing to listen to. There comes a point when you stop paying a lot of attention to it from repetition, and it’s then that adding another part such as a lead guitar fleshes these songs out to their fullest and completes the engaging aspect of them. 

Acchi deconstructs itself very quickly, and this marks the point of no return as far as familiar styles go. The next track begins with lead guitar emphasized by spaced out hits of the hi-hat, and soon dies out as quickly as it came. It returns quickly, and from there picks up speed gradually with more pronounced playing. These songs have a really entrancing way of picking up steam, doing so in a way that’s almost difficult to notice. The vocals on this are much rougher than the ones from the previous track, and contain an energy in them that’s almost unfitting with how slow the rhythm guitar and drums are marching. With certain chord changes, though, everything seems to sync up for brief periods like a window into the sort of song most are comfortable with. 

Next up is Suki Ni Sureba Ii, which makes an odd contrast as a very melancholy song with the two explosive tracks before it. The vocals on this are almost ghost-like, and the guitar here accentuates this by fading in and out whenever needed. Unlike the other songs, this one never really “takes off”, and the most remarkable addition to the sound is a wailing electric guitar part. The bass on this is notable on the second half for being the instrument with the greatest attention, keeping the lead guitar in the distance. With no drums on this long section, it has a very strange effect of not going in any foreseeable direction, and this really brings the sadder aspect of this to its height. The vocals reemerge at the end, and it wavers on a single note before disappearing. 

Todokanai enters with a strange combination of percussive noises which remind me of ping-pong balls hitting a table along with a wild harmonica that’s almost ear-shattering with the force it’s played at compared to the other instruments. The vocals begin at a calmer and relaxed tempo, and elevate in intensity as the percussion packs a stronger punch until they suddenly burst out into a full groove. This is possibly the best crescendo on the album, as it’s nearly perfect in execution, and it reaches its full climax as the vocalist explodes with energy and the rest of the song devolves and slows down until it ends with two alternating guitar notes. 

Fuwafuwa is like a combination of Suki Ni Sureba Ii’s melancholy tone with the huge crescendo of Todokanai. This song is made unique for being reminiscent of 60s pop or doo-wop music, and near the end of the track, all parts drop out suddenly, leaving just the angelic vocals behind with the percussion hanging idly in the background. Approaching the conclusion, they increase rapidly and the song ends on a high note. Nattanjanai comes next, and is almost schizophrenic in nature. Featuring sharp dots of feedback, machine-gun bursts of percussion and guitar, and a lead guitar that seems to be playing another song entirely, this is easily the most panicked and arguably most energetic song on the album. The vocals come in quickly without any heed for the other instruments, and the song moves forward like a car held together with duct tape. As it proceeds it falls apart into progressively greater paranoia, and ends as abruptly as it began. 

Maigo emerges with relaxed rhythm guitar that creates the most friendly atmosphere yet, and works off of where it starts at for its length until about halfway. It is there that things become progressively more and more chaotic. The parts don’t necessarily become loud and abrasive to emphasize with this, but it’s very noticeable in the way that they cease to function with each other. The track ends like it came with gentle guitar and a strange buzzing sound, like the lights are about to shut down. The closer being up next is a neat coincidence, though almost ironic considering its monstrous length. 

The closer, Koko, is without a doubt the crowning achievement of this album and perhaps this band’s best song. The opening guitar part on this song is similar to that of Nattanjai in how it comes in quick bursts, and the drums are similar in this though they don’t sync up exactly. The vocalist is excellent here, and sounds emotionally wrought out here exaggerated by the backing parts. This section ends very quickly, and the song is soon revived with just the vocalist and faint guitar strumming which is surprisingly incredibly beautiful. The man’s voice has a wavering effect to it which is breathtaking. He stops singing for a period and the silence is broken by a guitar strumming. Just as the rhythm part begins finding itself again, he reenters the song and guides it for a bit more. 

The song finally finds itself here, as this part is slower with a good amount of variation between the vocalist coming and going with the different instruments being used. As it comes close to the ending, all parts drop out but the vocalist, and a steady guitar part is played once more. The drums come back in quickly and a relatively quick crescendo leads to some of the harshest singing on the album before dropping out. Finally, it concludes with just the man singing in an angelic tone rising and falling, and ends softly. 

This is an album that pushes the limits of its genre, and hopefully this long review/examination of it has at least given you some insight into why. It’s never shy of extreme experimentation, and yet it still manages to sound incredibly beautiful. The contrast in this album is excellent, and though I will admit that it can take excessive amounts of time to get to where it needs to go (Perhaps 26 minutes is too long?), the atmosphere it draws up is unlike few others. Live is a difficult listen due to its sheer length and the amount of variation it contains, but for anyone who does give it a shot and listens to it all the way through, I can guarantee there’s at least something in it they’ll enjoy….by….fieryterminator …~

the most conventional Fushitsusha’s album (in terms that it has real songs, of course), but not the weakest one. it is an incredible piece of art that shakes the nerves of the rock structure with the tensive calmness of the nonsense of Zen that Haino has. proving that, the bluesy first track, with an infectious riff played by an other guitar (I think Maki Miura was in Fushitsusha in that time)… in another tracks, Haino’s solos has an emotional touch that stands with Neil Young’s and David Guilmour’s guitar styles. if you really want to know one of the greatest last psychedelic bands, listen to Keiji Haino & Fushitsusha…by…theloner …~

Very deliberate and at times excruciatingly downtempo. Seemingly less psychedelic than other Japanese avant-garde contemporaries (and those that followed in similar footsteps). But when they bag that perfect, interesting, molasses riff, that hauntingly echoing picking, it makes the trudge all worth it. Fushitsusha go beyond your standard far-eastern blues/psych and infuse the music with a chilling melancholy which wears strangely pleasantly on the ears, if your ears are properly prepared. The vocals dip to the lower rungs of emotion and are (gladdenly) not-perfect; a human horn-call to point out the messiness of the instrumentation. And even on the most weird/chaotic of tunes (track 2, disc 2 - don’t ask me to translate titles) the oddly ethereal guitar cuts through the stuttering, stodgy rhythm section. Beautiful ugliness. And some is just beautiful…by…RIStout …~


Fushitsusha (不失者) is a Japanese rock band specialising in the experimental and psychedelic rock genres. The band consists of electric guitarist and singer Keiji Haino, and a shifting cast of complementary musicians. The group released the majority of its material in the 1990s. 

History 
Haino formed Fushitsusha in 1978, although their first LP was not released until 1989. The band initially consisted of Haino on guitar and vocals, and Tamio Shiraishi on synthesizer. After the departure of Shiraishi, Ayuo joined briefly in 1979 before Fushitsusha became a trio with the addition of Jun Hamano (bass) and Shuhei Takashima (drums). The lineup soon changed, adding Yasushi Ozawa (bass) and Jun Kosugi (drums) throughout the 1990s. Their 1993 album Allegorical Misunderstanding was released on John Zorn’s record label, Avant, although most of their albums have come out on independent label P.S.F. and on major label Tokuma. 

Fushitsusha recently returned to duo status, with Haino supplementing percussion with tape loops, though the band is believed to have been on hiatus since 2001. 

In February 2008, longtime bassist Yasushi Ozawa died. 

In August 2015, bassist Chiyo Kamekawa was dismissed because he plays in another band MANNERS. 

Music 
The band’s sound is influenced by German krautrock bands of the 1970s and British psychedelic music of the 1960s and 1970s. They are generally considered part of the Japanese psychedelic music scene alongside bands like Ghost and Acid Mothers Temple. Their music occasionally ventures to the more aggressive “Japanoise” end of the sonic spectrum, but usually remains haunting and contemplative. …~


Credits 
Bass [Uncredited] – Yasushi Ozawa 
Drums [Uncredited] – Akui*, Seijiro Murayama 
Guitar [Uncredited] – Maki Miura 
Guitar [Uncredited], Vocals [Uncredited] – Keiji Haino

Live recording. Usually referred to as “Live 1” or “1st”. 
Reissued on double CD in 1997

Tracklist 
A1 あっち 12:32 
A2 暗号 10:21 
B1 すきにやればいい 11:38 
B2 とどかない 10:27 
C ここ 26:06 
D1 ふわ ふわ 8:04 
D2 なったんじゃない 7:46 
D3 迷子 10:03 

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