Saturday, 31 March 2018

San Ul Lim 산울림 "The First" 1977 + “제2집” 1978 South Korea Psych Rock


San Ul Lim  산울림  "The First" 1977 + “제2집” 1978 South  Korea Psych Rock
full two albums on vk

San Ul Lim is Korean and means “the rumbling of a mountain”. This band began their musical life as a hobby roughly around 1976 because the members were only college students who love and play rock music. The three members are real brothers. A big hit of their first album, however, enabled them to continue their recordings through the late 70s to the early 80s. But two of the brothers left the music business to pursue their careers. Only the eldest, Chang Wan Kim, was left to remain as “San Ul Lim” from the mid 80s….~


Bio
Folkie Jin : “San Ul Rim are the most famous hobby band (“naughty rock band”) in South-Korea. Most Korean rock specialists say that San Ul Rim’s music is not connected with previous Korean rock groups. One day they just appeared on the Korean rock scene. They are brothers, Kim Chang Wan is the group leader (Lead vocals and guitar) and eldest brother, Kim Chang Hun is the second eldest, a bass guitar player, youngest bother is a Kim Chang Ik and he is a drummer. They were born out of a rich family in Seoul. Thanks to that they could buy the necessary rock instruments. At first Kim Chang Wan bought an ‘acoustic guitar and Classical guitar guide book’ when he was a university freshman. Thanks to that the other brothers could learn the guitar. Their parents said that they were going to buy a piano as an entrance gift, if Chang Hun entered the university. But they didn’t like it because it was too feminine. And they asked to their parents to give me a set of rock band musical instruments instead. Therefore they could get a drum set, two amps, and two guitars. After that they often played their own rock songs weekly. I believe they just enjoyed the brother gem for about four years!! 
In 1977 there was held the first University student song contest. They were interested in the contest and joined in the preliminary hearing of it and their song came to the first class in the preliminary hearing but fell off at the main contest because Kim Chang Wan graduated at the time. Although they fell off at the main contest, they discovered their self confidence. 
Before they participated in the contest, their band name was A Mu-Lee (meaning that “Be not different”). The band name called San Ul Rim (means “That Mountain echo”) was made by Kim Chang Wan, impromptu, when their first album was released.”
So after that they recorded their demo tape on a JVC portable recorder and went to the SRB record company. Finally they finished their first recording (in just one day). They just would like to have their own album. Songs were recorded in just one take without dubbing. These recordings were to be divided afterwards into several songs by the producer). 
At first they recorded their demo tape by a JVC portable recorder and went to the SRB record company, because the SRB record company was the nearest place to their home. They had already over one hundred songs written by themselves before they debuted. They wanted heavy guitar sounds like AC/DC but it was impossible to make a sound like them because of insufficient technological know-how. So they only depended on psychedelic ad lib or fuzz guitar. But ironically this made their first album sound unique. After their first album release, many Korean young people were surprised by their music!! 
Their music was very unique and fresh and it distinguished them from previous Korean pop music. 
Anyway their first album became a million seller in the Korean 1970s pop scene over the time. The record sold immediately over five hundreds of thousands copies! But band members were in confusion. They didn’t know their music would be that good. So they said that “After our first album release, we are just left with our musical instruments and lost our music.”
After five months, their second album was released. They tried to define their musical genre on this album. They had added organ sounds by their sister Kim Nan Suk. Especially the most important thing is that not only Korean music fans but also Korean music mania outside Korea had been wildly excited by their music. Their music became more psychedelic and interomptu. Radio show comments : “San Ul Rim’s two earliest early albums have a certain primitive but honest rock sound, in essence like a kind of garage psych but with some refinement in recording. We hear simple chords but with best effect and most effective arrangements. The second album also has folk ballads, like track 4, 5. For Korea this more simple straight forwardness of the group with great effect was new. For the Western listener who grew in appreciating creativity with simplicity (with 2/3 chords) it was a recognition of talent. Without knowing San Ul Lim here created a new approach to rock for Korea. (Otherwise Magma would never had sounded like they were)….You can hear there was an attempt to sound more international prog & hardrock. The voice on firtst track of vol.2 has a punk-like attitude. Of course it has the undeliberate sophistication too in the rock feel. The long track of vol.2 is the best "progressive” as “psychrock” effort San Ul Rim ever did. With great electric fuzz guitar and repetitive but effective drums (and bass), with some high-flute like keyboards.“
Weirdo Rec. description vol.1 : "San Ul Lim (translated as ‘That Mountain Echo’, alternate spellings include 'Sanulim’, 'Sanullim’ and 'San Ul Rim’) was formed by three brothers born of privilege in Seoul, South Korea. With confidence gained from endless practicing and competing in a university student song contest, they approached record label SRB (because it was near their house!) and recorded their first album in just one day. Upon its release in 1977, the LP sold over a half-million copies and paved the way for many further volumes. The songs are full of fuzz guitar, tinny keyboards and simple production, reminding one of the American garage and pop-psychedelic groups from the sixties, but with an Asian flavor. For this new reissue World Psychedelia have included two pages of English liner notes, explaining the significance of the final track, a cover of the traditional Korean folk song 'Arirang’.”…~

“In the late 1970s, Sanullim seemingly arrived out of nowhere to take Korea by storm. By the 1990s, Sanullim’s earlier records had attained textbook – even bible-like – status for the Korean rock musicians who came later. Depending on the speaker, Sanullim were hailed as everything from heavy metal originators, punk founders, and even alternative rock pioneers. The fact is that Sanullim’s music is much broader than any such simple descriptions. The first three albums were released within a 2-year period. Because they were recorded within such short intervals of each other, the 3 albums’ tracks are deeply interconnected.The debut album kicked off with a resounding bang which became an instant nationwide hit. Suddenly in 1977, What, Already? was everywhere. The phrase What, Already? itself took on a life of its own as a catchphrase. Comedians inserted the phrase in their skits, and kids would imitate them. The sound of the tune’s guitar riff, with its fuzz effect, grainy like crumbled biscuits, was unmistakably rock ‘n roll – a delight to listeners who had waited so long since Beautiful Woman by Shin Joong-hyun and the Yupjuns. It was Likely Late Summer, Fireworks, and Please Open the Door also got radio airplay. The uncanny and sexy tempo shift in It was Likely Late Summer, the toned-down groove of Remorse, and the sombre lyricism of That Face, That Look set Sanullim’s songs apart from those of their contemporaries. Also, the sheer rocking loudness of Fireworks and the quirky playfulness of Please Open the Door were enough to pique the interest of even the diehard rock & pop listeners. While musically, Sanullim’s sound was unmistakably rock ’n roll, the matter-of-fact realism of their lyrics and awkward vocals came together to brew up an original edge that made them instantly recognizable even to the general population. A legend had just been born.Sanullim’s second album came in 1978, a year after their debut. As with What, Already? from the first album, the second album opens with another shocker, Laying Silks and Satin on my Heart – the track that would go on to let Sanullim function as a long-run unit. Unlike What, Already? that dives straight into the first verse after a brief intro riff, Laying Silks and Satin on my Heart opens with an extended free-form psychedelic intro, with a fuzz guitar drifting over a droning bass groove. That Sanullim were able to get away with such an experimental (and long – running 6+ minutes) opening track, and that it also ended up becoming a massive hit, attests to just how huge – and unexpected – a success the first album was. Aside from Laying Silks and Satin on my Heart, other notable experimental numbers on the second album include A Flower Blooming in the Haze, Blossomed Someday, and This Joy. The second album has no weak spots. There’s the Sanullim version of What Am I Going to Do? as well as My Beloved Departs, which embodies a distinctly Korean feel reminiscent of a traditional funeral procession.The third album has generally been hailed as Sanullim’s greatest work ever. First of all, there’s the experimentalism of the magnum opus, You Are Already Me, that takes up the entirety of the record’s b-side, as well as Kim Chang-hoon’s My Soul (is a Barren Wasteland) that was only recognized belatedly. Also, the third album did not have an obvious ‘hit single’ comparable to What, Already? from the debut or Laying Silks… from the second album. The third album reveals some sonic departures from the previous two albums. First of all, there’s the absence of organ or piano parts (aside from a smattering of effects inserted into You Are Already Me). There are no session musicians on this record – it was recorded entirely with the bare-bones trio lineup. A nice facet of the Sanullim sound is that the guitar tone shifts from clean to fuzz along with the tune’s tempo changes. This is on prominent display in songs like My Soul (is a Barren Wasteland), and Without a Word. The clean tone is used throughout Becoming a Bird, and presages the sound of Sanullim’s later ‘children’s music’ phase. Of all the tunes on the third album, Becoming… got the heaviest airplay. The track Lonesome Night is a departure in that it’s a full-on blues number. Running upwards of 8 minutes, the track focuses on instrumentation rather than vocals. It’s a peculiar track that doesn’t have many parallels, even in Sanullim’s later work. You Are Already Me motivated many a record collector to purchase the third album. Its running time of 18+ minutes, taking up the entire b-side of the LP (all records were LPs back then), was simply unheard of until then. By the time the third album came out, Sanullim had reached peak popularity; rather than milking this further, they’d chosen to tighten their focus as a band in favor of experimentalism.However, the albums that came later had little to show for in terms of ‘tightness’. While the fourth, fifth, and sixth albums are all decent works, the fourth was more of a compilation of the songs Sanullim had contributed to films and TV series, while the fifth and sixth were recorded while all members save Kim Chang-hwan were in their military services. Of course, all 13 of Sanullim’s regular albums are satisfying in terms of their individuality. And of these, the first three albums are absolute masterworks, indispensable for an understanding of Sanullim’s music and the historical context that gave rise to it.” ….~

“A trio of amazing records from this legendary Korean Group – packaged together in a limited box, with a booklet and bonus 7” single too! First up is San Ul Lim 1 – one of the coolest Korean records you’ll ever hope to hear – a set recorded in the mid 70s, but done with the same sort of psychedelic blend of jazz and funk elements you’d hear in Japanese albums from the early part of the decade! These guys use lots of fuzz on their guitars – a tone that’s freaky, but a style that’s nicely direct – especially when mixed with the strong basslines at the bottom – which almost always set up some sort of groove before the Korean language lyrics come into the mix! Lots of these tunes are the epitome of slow funk at its best – and sound even better with the trippy inflections on guitar, and the unfamiliar language – which really keeps things interesting. Next is San Ul Lim 2 – the middle child in the mighty Seoul combo San Ul Lim’s trio of albums – full of spacey, more experimental passages! If San Ul Lim 1 was the most sunshine rock oriented set, and San Ul Lim 3 flirted with hard rock, album 2 splits the difference with a little bit of groovy prog elements and lots of spacey organ! The tunes have some more languorous, moody bits that are rich with atmosphere and some really sweet work on bass, fuzzy guitars and the swirling organ – but the group’s excellent ear for melody and a catchy groove are still very much intact! Last up is San Ul Lim 3 – super fuzzed out, trippy 70s psych rock from Korea’s San Ul Lim – an album recorded by the Seoul rockers in the power trio format of guitar, bass and drums – but with such a fuzzy, dense tone that it’s hard to fathom how on Earth they got the sound! The opening track starts in wonderfully eye-opening fashion with the buzzing guitar sound and raspy vocals – but the follow up tracks have a softer vocal tone and more of a spacey effect – kind of evocative of “Sister Ray” in the relentless buzz sounds, but with a more lilting overall vibe! Includes notes in English, but the titles are Korean – 5 tracks in all, including a mammoth 18 minute closer! Box set includes a bonus 4 track 7" EP – complete with pic sleeve replica – and a bonus book with notes in English.“ …..Dusty Groove….~


산울림  "아니 벌써” 1977 debut Lp

Gentle garage-psych with a dreamy west coast flair and tons of awesome fuzzed-out guitars… with Korean-language lyrics. Originally released in 1977, South Korean trio San Ul Lim’s debut album sounds like the best psychedelic power pop and garage stuff you could get in the UK and USA ten years before its release. One of the most popular acts on the Korean scene, San Ul Lim had exactly this typical 1966 garage sound, with fuzzy axes and some thin but sympathetic Farfisa organs. These compositions were conceived between 1971 and 1975, and, with their heartwarming vocal melodies and gifted musicianship, are heavily reminiscent of The Zombies, though San Ul Lim play in a much more direct fashion. Their music represents a movement from early beat to heavier and darker garage rock, which finally shifted into psychedelic rock. Fans of proto-garage beat with psychedelic tinges from 1965 to 1967 will go wild for this album. Other reference points include The Flies (UK, pre-T2) and The Petards (Germany). A lovely flashback to the golden age of music….~

Credits 
Bass Guitar – 김창훈 
Drums – 김창익 
Vocals, Guitar – 김창완

Tracklist 
아니 벌써
아마 늦은 여름이었을 거야
골목길
안타까운 마음
그 얼굴 그 모습
불꽃놀이
문 좀 열어줘
소녀
청자(아리랑


산울림  "제2집" 1978 second Lp

South Korean garage/psych rockers San Ul Lim’s second album, originally released in 1978, is more related to American music from the second half of the '60s than anything else. In a year in which disco, punk, and early heavy metal ruled, this flowery and trippy pop sound with fuzzed-out guitars on flashing rhythms might have been outdated already despite the fact that the original US garage sound had a renaissance among collectors not long before the album’s release, and compilations like Pebbles were in high demand among new fans of this genre. One may doubt that these hunters for vinyl treasures even made the slightest effort to take a look toward Eastern Asia, where San Ul Lim came up with exactly that type of music. They had a sense for pop melodies and, beyond that, for soulful ballads with heartwarming melodies. Nice and sleazy organ sounds (Farfisa, not Hammond) add more color to the simply structured, yet effectively striking tracks, and when the fuzz sets in even slower tunes start to turn into simmering maelstroms of utterly checkered harmonies. This is for sure not the only direction San Ul Lim take on their second album. Some folky singer-songwriter elements slip into their song selection and definitely remind the listener of a warm summer weekend in August 1969 when 500,000 gathered for the most important music event ever at Yasgur’s farm. San Ul Lim consisted of skilled musicians who executed their compositions with an obsessive feel and an iron discipline. The band had matured ever since the release of their debut album the previous year and this is apparent in the more excessive and obsessive playing, the increased rawness of the guitar fuzz, and the slightly deeper, more thought-provoking and sometimes even more aggressive melodies that diverge from pure feel good-pop music. What you get here is a delightful mixture of what was awesome in the west in 1966 and '67, and despite being a bit late, San Ul Lim still had the fire of passion in a way The Seeds, The Doors, Strawberry Alarm Clock, The Animals, The Shadows of Knight, and even Nick Drake, Roy Harper, and Bert Jansch, did. Retro garage sound with style and soul – who could resist that?…~

Tracklist 
내 마음에 주단을 깔고
노래 불러요
안개속에 핀 꽃
둘이서
기대어 잠든 아이처럼
어느날 피었네
나 어떡해
이 기쁨
정말 그런 것 같애
떠나는 우리님 


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