Monday, 9 April 2018

Ike Turner & The Kings Of Rhythm “A Black Man’s Soul” 1969 US Soul Funk (Best 100 -70’s Soul Funk Albums Groove Collector)


Ike Turner & The Kings Of Rhythm “A Black Man’s Soul” 1969 US Soul Funk   (Best 100 -70’s Soul Funk Albums Groove Collector)..top classic…! 
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https://open.spotify.com/album/2GDvNYRABstEqTnF5gu8L3

watch Ike Turner biography

https://www.wikizero.com/en/Ike_Turner



I have no words to describe how difficult it was to realize how important was Ike Turner’s Kings Of Rhythm band for the next generations of music artists. Not that I would doubt their potential, it’s just because, for most of the people that felt in love with Tina Turner’s music, it was very hard to accept Ike’s dehumanized behavior as her husband and partner (he was known to beat her wife Tina Turner several times during their marriage and partnership). 
Formed on the end fourties, Ike Turner’s band Kings Of Rhythm got their place on the Rhythm & Blues history as well as Rock n’ Roll for their brilliant releases, from their partnership with sax player Jackie Brenston and the release of “Rocket 88” under the name Jackie Brenston & His Delta Cats (known as one of the very first Rock & Roll releases in 1951) to the fifties R&B hits and more than three decades of influential music, including the underrated album “A Black Man’s Soul” from 1969. Even Jimmy Hendrix played on the band during the sixties, before being acclaimed as a solo artist. 
Of course the “Kings Of Rhythm”’s musical talent cannot be condemned because of Ike’s bad actions; even though, it’s almost impossible to have as a hero a leader that would use psychological threats and physical violence on a regular basis, specially against his wife. 
This kind of behavior Ike Turner had was deeply unfortunate, specially because it would affect the lifes and the careers of all those artists that were part of Ike’s bands (and most specially Tina Turner, of course). Despite this fact that the journey of these talented musicians would be affected by Ike’s form of leadership, the ensemble of their music became a standard not only for Rhythm & Blues and Rock n’ Roll, but also Soul, Funk and even more recent genres of music (Hip Hop and Electronic Music included). 
Undervalued LP “A Black Man’s Soul” by Ike Turner’s Kings Of Rhythm reached the level of a primar influence to all those genres for its rich content, specially for Marvin Holmes’ dance hit cover “Funky Mule”: its energetic, very intense and powerful opening drum solo by Mack Johnson would become a timeless Breakbeat standard. 
As a result, “Funky Mule” breaks would be sampled and used on several kinds of music, from Hip Hop to the avant-garde Breakbeats of 4 Hero, Techno icon Luke Slater, and the Drum n’ Bass artists Paradox, Senses, and JMJ & Flytronix duo, among other. “Funky Mule” was later included on important compilations such as ‘DJ Pogo Presents The Breaks’, 'B-Boy Anthems Volume Three’ and 'Solid Steel Presents Hexstatic - Listen & Learn’….Alain_Patrick ….~


Great & rare lp from ike and his band… killer “Funky mule”, “Ghetto funk”, “Black Beauty”. It’s R&B, oldies funk & deep instrumental soul … on “Pompeii Records” and distributed by “ATCO Records”. this is a mono issue, exist a stereo issue ( green) too. A super LP. Fabulous instumentation. Black Dope !!!..grovie collector…~



When he was out on tour in 1969 with his regular gig, the Ike & Tina Turner Revue, Ike Turner found the time to cut the instrumental album A Black Man’s Soul. Whenever he had some spare time he would drag the band into a local studio and lay down tracks, resulting in these 12 funky soul jams that sound like they were lifted from the soundtrack to a blaxploitation film. The band is tight and laid-back at once, with horns at the forefront most of the time. Turner came up with some fine grooves like “Thinking Black,” “Getting Nasty” (with Billy Preston on piano), “Scotty Souling,” “Nuttin’ Up,” and the monumental “Funky Mule.” However, the record lacks Turner’s usual fire and flair and ultimately is too polite and slick to be very memorable (“Funky Mule” aside). [The 2004 reissue on Funky Delicacies adds an instrumental version of “Chain of Fools” plus three tracks with Tina on vocals. The addition of her vocals provides the fire that the rest of the album lacks; of course she tears it up, but the band sounds tougher too, especially on their moody cover of “Drifting Blues.”]….by Tim Sendra..allmusic….~


“Unarguably at the top of Ike Turner’s long list of fine accomplishments; an under-appreciated, undervalued and undeniably funky soul gift.” – Wax Poetics….~


I’m only writing 'cause I can’t believe no one’s been here yet. This foot stompin’ “soul jazz” album (for lack of a better descriptive) is in the Young Holt Unlimited vein. Get on the Youtubes and search the track “Getting Nasty.” That’s all you should need to convince you. Okay you need more? I hear you. I’d want to know that there was more than one track of merit as well. “Nuttin’ Up” is your next assignment then. More? Okay, “Black Beauty” is driving funk piece which seems straight from a Blaxploitation flick, “Ghetto Funk” is akin to some Mongo Santamaria jam and my favorite track of all on this album is “Freedom Sound”–a slow burn to uplifting crescendo, piano keys driving us home as the chorus weighs in (maybe some Galt MacDermot in there…?). Sweet indeed. Sweet indeed. All basically instrumentals, except the last 3 tracks “No More Doggin’,” “Knock on Wood,” and “Drifting Blues” which return to more familiar Ike and Tina R&B fare. “No More Doggin’” is solid though. If you dig piano driven soul jazz, don’t miss this one….by….Rawrawlikeadungeondragon…~


Phew!!! 
Is this good or what! 
Ike Turner was mean composer/arranger and this album of funky instrumentals is a proof that in 1969. he moved away from “Rocket 88” and those early country-blues sound and could easily follow James Brown in that direction if he wanted to,in fact the whole album sounds very much like music for some Shaft-like movie - horns prominent,rhytm pulsating,guitars fuzzing… you can just see some snappy pimp with golden chain making his way through tough neighbourhood and giving five left and right to his buddies. 
“Getting Nasty” - this is the song that just sounds so right and have traces of best instrumentals by James Brown and Ray Charles from 1960s - Billy Preston’s piano rolls along with guys playing in the background and someone whoops now and than,there are whistles and talks in background,you can hear how much they enjoyed being there. 
Centerpiece is of course “Funky Mule” with prominent horns and guitars - truly this is something that would make Isaac Hayes snap his fingers and take of that sunglasses. 
Because it actually preceeds Shaft for good three years,this album definitely falls in the same category and is easily reccomended to anybody interested in funk.In fact,play it today and it sounds just as cool and timeless as back in 1969. 
Reminds me a bit on music played on “Try (just a little bit harder)” from I Got Dem Ol’ Kozmic Blues Again Mama! but of course her version was based on Lorraine Ellison original,so there you go,any way you look it comes back to same source - original 1960s soul/funk. 
Excellent….by…1969SL …~


A Back Man’s Soul is an instrumental funk and soul album, released with a black and white and colored cover. It contains songs written by Ike Turner, his St. Louis colleague Oliver Sain and some others. The album was recorded at various studios in the U.S. between tour dates. The album was originally released in 1969 from Pompeii Records in America on vinyl and 8-track cartridge. In England, it was first issued in 1975 from DJM Records under the different title „Funky Mule“ and in Germany from Bellaphone Records as „Ike Turner & His Kings of Rhythm“. It was reissued in 2002 in it’s original format from Funky Delicacies Records and in 2003 on compact disc with four bonus tracks, including three with vocals from Tina Turner. It’s also part of the 3 CD box set The Complete Pompeii Recordings from 2016….~


When he was out on tour in 1969 with his regular gig, the Ike & Tina Turner Revue, Ike Turner found the time to cut the instrumental album A Black Man’s Soul. Whenever he had some spare time he would drag the band into a local studio and lay down tracks, resulting in these 12 funky soul jams that sound like they were lifted from the soundtrack to a blaxploitation film. The band is tight and laid-back at once, with horns at the forefront most of the time. Turner came up with some fine grooves like “Thinking Black,” “Getting Nasty” (with Billy Preston on piano), “Scotty Souling,” “Nuttin’ Up,” and the monumental “Funky Mule.” However, the record lacks Turner’s usual fire and flair and ultimately is too polite and slick to be very memorable (“Funky Mule” aside).(by by Tim Sendra)….~


The Kings of Rhythm are an American Rhythm and blues and Soul group formed in the late 1940s in Clarksdale, Mississippi and led by Ike Turner through to his death in 2007. Turner would retain the name of the band throughout his career, although the group has undergone considerable lineup changes over time. The group was an offshoot of a large big band ensemble called “The Tophatters”. By the late 1940s Turner had renamed this group the “Kings of Rhythm”. Their early stage performances consisted largely of covers of popular jukebox hits of the day. A 1951 lineup of the group recorded the song “Rocket 88”, which was an early example of Rock and roll. In the 1960s they became the band for the “Ike & Tina Turner Revue”. For a few years in the early 1970s they were renamed “The Family Vibes”, and released 2 albums under this name, both produced by, but not featuring Ike Turner. The band have continued, for a time under the leadership of pianist Ernest Lane (himself a childhood friend of Turner’s), and continues to tour with vocalist Earl Thomas. The group has been running for at least 64 years….~


Credits 
Bass – Jesse Knight 
Drums – Mack Johnson 
Guitar – Ike Turner 
Percussion – Teasky Tribble 
Piano – Fred Sample, Ike Turner 
Producer – Ike & Tina Turner 
Saxophone – Washee 
Trombone – Jesse Heron 
Vocals – Tina Turner


Tracklist 
A1 Thinking Black
A2 Black Beauty
A3 Ghetto Funk
A4 Blacks’ Alley
A5 Black Angel
A6 Getting Nasty
B1 Funky Mule
B2 Philly Dog
B3 Scotty Souling
B4 Up Hard
B5 Nuttin’ Up
B6 Freedom Sound



Band members 

1951 Rocket 88 recording band (Jackie Brenston and His Delta Cats) 

Ike Turner – piano
Jackie Brenston – saxophone, vocals
Willie Kizart – guitar
Raymond Hill – saxophone
Willie “Bad Boy” Sims – drums 

1950s / 60s Members 

Ike Turner – piano
Jackie Brenston – saxophone, vocals
Johnny O’Neal – lead vocals
Willie “Bad Boy” Sims – drums
Raymond Hill – Saxophone
Bobby Fields
Bob Prindall – drums
Edward Nash
Eugene Washington – drums
Eddie Jones – Tenor Saxophone
Eugene Fox
Clifford Solomon
Clayton Love
Ernest Lane (late 50s – early 60s and 1999–2009)
Willie Kizart – guitar
C. V. Veal (Ike’s cousin)
Jesse Knight, Jr. (Ike’s nephew) – Bass
Bonnie Turner – Piano, lead vocals
Annie Mae Wilson – piano[

Studio lineup for A Black Man’s Soul (1969)
Bass – Jesse Knight
Drums – Mack Johnson
Guitar – Ike Turner
Percussion – Teasky Tribble
Piano – Fred Sample, Ike Turner, Billy Preston on “Getting Nasty”
Saxophone – Washee
Trombone – Jesse Heron
Vocals – Tina Turner 

1970s Members
Edward Burks – trombone
Jackie Clark – guitar
Warren Dawson – bass
McKinley Johnson – trumpet
Mark Landon – guitar[5]
John Leland – bass
Mary Reed – tenor saxophone
Jimmy Smith—tenor saxophone
J.D. Reed – baritone saxophone
Soko Richardson – drums
Ike Turner – Bandleader and arranger, Organ 

Current Lineup
Paul Smith - Keyboards, Organ
Leo Dombecki – Keyboards, saxophone
Bill Ray – Drums
Armando Cepeda – Bass
Ryan Montana – Saxophone
Seth Blumberg – Guitar 









Albums 
1962: Dance With Ike & Tina Turner’s Kings of Rhythm 
1969: Ike Turner & the Kings of Rhythm: A Black Man’s Soul 
1972: Ike Turner & the Family Vibes: Strange Fruit 
1973: Ike Turner Presents the Family Vibes: Confined to Soul 
1973: Bad Dreams 
1984: Hey Hey – The Legendary Ike Turner and the Kings of Rhythm/Red Lightnin’ compilation RL0047 

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